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BrethrerHs Family Almanac. 



IStudebaker 




The Lumber used is sea- 
soned under cover by the 
slow process of time, con- 
sequently the full strength 
is preserved. Many a 
"Studebaker" has served 
its owner for a quarter of a 
century, and more. If no 

agent in your town, write us direct, mentioning this Almanac, and we will 
send you free a copy of " The Old Homestead " exquisitely produced. Duplicate copies, 50 cents each. 

STUDEBAKER BROS. MFG. CO., SOUTH BEND, IND., 

Builders of Carriages, Wagons and Harness of every description. 



Is the Lightest Running and most 
Durable Wagon Made. 

Made by practical and skilled 
mechanics. Thoroughly tested in 
every climate, the world over. 

Is yours a STUDEBAKER? 
If not, why not get one and 

TEAM. 
REPAIRS. 
TIME. 
MONEY. 



SAVE 




OUR PRICES WILL PLEASE YOU. 

We Handle Wire for all Purposes, Iron Gates and Fence, Wire, Steel 

and Wood Fence Stays, Ratchets, Staples, Gas 

Pipe, Nails, Tools, Etc. 

When writing, state just what you want and in what quantities. May 
we not have the privilege of naming you prices on what you may need? 
Catalogue and prices sent upon appHcation. 

THE HOLLINQER FENCE CO., 

Greenville, Ohio. 




Expectant 
Mothers... 



Who suffer from morning sickness, nervousness, 
sleeplessness, backaches, varicose veins in limbs, 
cramps or other distresses, should use Dr. Wrights- 
man's Sovereign Balm of Life. It allays nervous, 
ness and future forebodings, and produces sweet, re- 
freshing sleep, and so assists nature that parturition 
is short and easy. Many mothers get through in half 
an hour. 

It is also a most excellent female remedy, and can 
be used at any period of a woman's life. 

The Sovereign Balm of Life is prepared by us in 
the liquid or dry form. The liquid is for sale by 
druggists, the dry form we send by mail direct to 
those who want to use it. The price is $1.00 per bot- 
tle or $1.00 per package. 

Write for booklet giving testimonials and other 
particulars in full. 
Address all letters to 



Box 400. 



D. B. SENGER & CO., 

Franklin Grove, 111, 



BRETHREN'S 

Plain Ciotliing 

If you want 

RELIABLE GOODS, made up 
in a first-class manner and 
at reasonable prices, we can 
satisfy you. 

When you buy frem us 

you GET wtiat you want. 
Wlten you buy from your 
local dealer, as a rule, you 
TAKE what you can get. 

We always 
guarantee Satisfaction 

and refer to our many patrons, 
some of whom will be found in 
nearly any community where the 
Brethren reside. Samples of cloth 
from which we make our clothing, 
•measuring blank, tape line and 
rules for ordering will be sent on application. 
Our rules for self-measurement are so simple, any- 
one can understand them. 

We want to hear from you. 

PHILLIPS0N40THING COMPANY 

WARSAW, INDIANA. 




Brethren's Family Almanac. 

— —J 



Homes in North Dakota! 



FREE LANDS 

Under the Homestead Law. 



IMPROVED FARMS on 

Crop Payment Plan. 

A FEW CROPS Will Pay Fcm a Farm! 



CHANCES FOR EASTERN RENTERS, 

In the Red River Valley, Devils Lake Region, and Turtle 
Mountain Country, along the Line of the 

Great ® Northern ^ Railway. 




During the last four years the undersigned has located hundreds of Breth- 
ren and others in North Dakota, in all no less than eighteen colonies, and there 
is room there for others. Brethren who go there now can find church organ- 
izations, school facilities, social opportunities and chances to make homes, at 
less cost than in any other part of the country. 

Write to me for publications containing the experiences of settlers. Let- 
ters asking questions promptly answered. 

a-E3srEia.A.ii i3vc3yEia-ia.A.rrionsr .A-OEasri", 
220 S. Clark St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



3 



THE SEA OF GALILEE. 



There is no body of water, sea or lake, around 
which so much New Testament history clusters, as 
that of the Sea of Galilee. Here it was that Peter, 
James, John, Zebedee and other of the disciples were 
called from their occupation as fishermen, to be 
fishers for men and followers of the Blessed Master. 
Along its beautiful shores thousands were miraculous- 
ly fed from the loaves and fishes, while they received, 
with gladsome hearts, the joyful message of the bet- 
ter life, as the golden words fell from his blessed lips. 
Here it was that he met, in the early morning hour, 
the weary and hapless disciples who had been toiling 



Around its sweet crystal water and along its shore 
was the scene of much of his Galilean ministry. Be- 
cause of this, and the fact that Capernaum was 
called the " home of Jesus," the sea and surroundings 
have become dear and sacred to ever)^ Christian 
heart. 

It has not only become famous in history, but its 
glory has been perpetuated in poetry and song. 
How many of us have been thrilled with the sweet 
song: " Memories of Galilee." 

Each cooing dove and sighing bough. 
That makes the eve so blest to me, 

Was something far diviner now, 
It bears me back to Galilee. 




DRAWING THE NET IN THE SEA OF GALILEE. 



all through the hours of night, without catching any- 
thing. Here it is that he lovingly told them to cast 
their net on the right side of the ship, when it was 
found so full that it was nigh unto breaking. Here, 
too, it was that, while they were storm-tossed, their 
frail bark being dashed and rolled from side to side, 
the world's Redeemer was awakened from his sleep, 
that he might rescue,— save them from the perils of 
storm and sea. He views the raging and lashing bil- 
lows, reaches forth his hand and says, " Peace, be 
Still. . . And there was a great calm." 



O Galilee! Sweet Galilee! Where Jesus loved so 

much to be; 
O Galilee! Blue Galilee! Come sing thy song again 

to me. 

That our readers may have a glimpse of this beau- 
tiful sea, its shores, and how they do the fishing, we 
give a photo of a fishing scene that was taken when 
we were there, during our late visit to the East. On 
our arrival at the sea, and while passing up along the 
shore, toward the City of Tiberias, we came to this 
party of fishermen who had cast their net far ou«t in- 



Year] 



F^]VI1LY ^LIM^ISTA^C. 



[1898. 



ECLIPSES FOR THE YEAR 1898. 
In the year 1898 there will be six Eclipses— three of the Sun and three of the Moon. 



EASTERN STATES. 
Moon enters Penumbra at 5 o'clock, 01 min. 
Moon enters Shadow "6 " 50 " 
Middle of the Eclipse " 7 " 37 " 
Moon leaves Shadow "8 " 25 " 
Moon leaves Penumbra " 10 " 03 " 



WESTERN STATES. 
3 o'clock. 41 min. 

5 " 30 " 

6 " 17 " 

7 " 05 " 

8 *' 43 •' 



MANITOBA. 
3 o'clock, 26 min. Even 

5 " 15 " Even 

6 " 02 " Even 
6 " 50 " Even 
8 " 28 " Even 



The First is a Partial Eclipse of the Moon, January 7th, and visible in Eastern part of 
North America, South America, Europe, Asia and Africa. 

CENTRAL STATES. 
4 o'clock, 21 min. 
6 " 10 " 

6 " 57 " 

7 " 45 " 
9 " 23 " 

The Second is a Total Eclipse of the Sun, January 22d, at 1 o'clock, 59 minutes, in the 
morning. Invisible here. Visible to Eastern Europe, Asia, Africa and the Indian Ocean. 

The Third is a Partial Eclipse of tpie Moon, July 3d, at 3 o'clock, 39 minutes, in the after- 
noon; therefore Invisible here. Visible generally in Europe, Asia and Africa. 

The Fourth is an Annular Eclipse of the Sun, July 18th, at 1 o'clock, 28 minutes, in the 
afternoon. Invisible here. Visible in Southern part of South America, New Zealand and the South 
Pacific Ocean. 

The Fifth is a Partial Eclipse of the Sun, December 13th, at 6 o'clock, 20 minutes, in the 
morning. Invisible here. 

The Sixth is a Total Eclipse of the Moon, December 27th, and Visible generally through- 
out North and South America, Europe, Asia and Africa. The Moon rises Eclipsed. 

EASTERN STATES. 
Moon enters Penumbra at 3 o'clock, 35 min. 

Moon enters Shadow " 4 " 50 " 

Total Eclipse begins " 6 " 00 " 

Middle of the Eclipse '"6 " 44 " 

Total Eclipse ends " 7 " 29 " 

Moon leaves Shadow " 8 " 38 " 

Moon leaves Penumbra " 9 " 53 " 

The Sun (©) is Called the Governing Planet this Year. 
CHARACTERS OF THE CONSTELLATIONS. 



central 


STATES. 


WESTERN STATES. 




MANITOBA. 


2 o'clock 


55 min. 


2 o'clock 


15 min. 


2n 


'clock 


00 min. Even 


4 


10 " 


3 


30 •• 


3 




15 " Even 


5 " 


20 " 


4 


40 " 


4 




25 " Even 


6 " 


04 " 


5 


24 " 


5 


" 


09 " Even 


6 " 


49 *' 


6 " 


09 " 


5 




54 " Even 


7 


58 " 


7 


18 " 


7 


" 


02 " Even 


9 " 


13 " 


8 " 


33 " 


8 




18 " Even 



^ Aries, the Ram. 
1^ Taurus, the Bull. 
y^ Gemini, the Twins. 
H^ Cancer, the Crab. 



(^ Leo, the Lion. 
^ Virgo, the Virgin. 
^ Libra, the Balance. 
cjjg Scorpio, the Scorpion. 



jg$ Sagittarius, the Bowm 
^ Capricornus, the Goat. 
^ Aquarius, the Butler. 
J£ Pisces, the Fishes. 

EXPLAINED. 

Q Moon's ascending Node, or Dragon's 

Head. 
S Moon's descending Node, or Dragon's 

• Tail. 
^ Moon's Ascension. 
^ Moon's Descension. 
2) Moon in apogee, farthest from earth. 
5) Moon in perigee, nearest to the earth 

PLANETS AND ASPECTS. 

(5 Conjunction, or planets in the same longitude. 
>|< Sextile, when they are 60 degrees apart. 
D Quartile, when they are 90 degrees distant. 
A Trine, when they are 120 degrees distant. 
(^Opposition, when they are 180 degrees distant 



ASTRONOMICAL CHARACTERS 

!!€|New Moon. 

I First Quarter, or Moon in general. 
^^Full Moon. 

Last Quarter, or Moon in general. 



J^ Saturn, $ Venus, 

If Jupiter, ^ Mercury, 

^ Mars, Earth, 

Sun, i^c Herschel. 

3) Moon, ^ Neptune. 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 



Dominical Letter 
Epact 



Lunar Cycle or Golilen Nuitier 18 

Solar Cycle 3 



Roman Indiction 11 

Julian Period 6611 



Brethre?i s Family Almanac. 



5 



to the sea, and were, when we came to them, in the 
act of drawing it to the shore. We looked upon it as 
almost a God-send to us, because it was the one 
thing above all others, that we wished to see at this 
place. On seeing such a scene no one can help being 
brought closer in touch with the real incidents of the 
Christ-life. To walk over the same ground, and al- 
most in the very footsteps, and see reproduced the 
scenes connected with the Master's eventful life, gives 
a nearness to it that cannot otherwise be had. 

Among the fishermen you will see part of our com- 
pany. It was more than a pleasure to take hold of 
the net, and with these simple fishermen, partly 
naked as they were in the days of Christ, help to draw 
it ashore full of fishes. While the people, in kind, 
have changed, in customs and habits they are much 
the same, especially in their manner of living, fishing, 
etc., so that even to-day we have largely repeated the 
life lived eighteen hundred years ago. The drawing 
of the net from the sea, full of fishes, was a scene by 
us greatly enjoyed, and will never be forgotten. 

The Sea of Galilee is about thirteen miles long, six 
miles wide, and ranges in depth from 150 to 800 feet. 
In the time of Christ its shores were dotted with vil- 
lages, towns and cities, but to-day only the city of 
Tiberias remains. Of the others only a very few of 
the ruins are to be seen. Then, its waters were 
plowed by hundreds of boats and small ships. Now, 
only a few fish-boats are found. The hills surround- 
ing are of moderate height, and the scenery is fine in 
springtime, but dull and uninteresting during the dry 
season. The Jordan empties into it at the north end, 
passes through it, and goes out at the south end. 
During the wet season it is also fed by the many lit- 
tle streams that flow down from the hills. The 
country is now sparsely inhabited by a people that 
have no ambition and are contented in living a rude 
and simple life, uninterrupted by wishes for change 
or improvement. With a Christian people and a 
good government, the country could be made not 
only productive, but an Eden-like home for a large 
number of people, as it, perhaps, will be when those 
to whom it is promised shall possess their land. 

H. B. B. 

ELD. JAMES QUINTER. 



At the close of a quiet, peaceful Lord's Day in 
early June, I stood on a tomb-crowned hilltop in soli- 
tude among the dead. The last sleeping place was 
redolent with the perfume of rose, honeysuckle and 
jasmine. The sun kissed the mountain-tops, and 
blossom and leaf danced in the soft zephyr which 
swept gently over the " city of the dead." In the val- 
ley below the blue river flowed noiselessly onward to 
lose its water, unselfishly, in the great ocean. On the 
banks of the stream, with church spires towering far 



above the green of maple and oak, stood, surpassing- 
ly beautiful for situation, the embowered city of the 
living. Lingering by the side of a grave, smothered 
in a wealth of blooming roses and sweet-scented 
honeysuckles, there came to me a vision of the life 
that once animated the form, now so quietly and 
peacefully resting in the shadow of the tomb. And, 
behold, I saw a noble life, great in achievement for 
God and the church; a life given for humanity's sake 
to the humble and lowly; a life crowned with ripened 
years and the love and esteem of all who knew it 
best; a life of constant endeavor for the advancement 
of all that was good, and true, and beautiful; a life 
with sympathy and love as broad as the human race; 
a life of such marked piety, of such holy influence, of 
such purity of thought and purpose, that it was at 
once an example and a blessing to all who came in 
contact with it. Putting aside with reverent hand 
the ivy and the honeysuckle, with bowed head I read 
on the marble block, 

ELDER JAMES QUINTER 

DIED 

May 19, 1888, 
Aged Seventy-two Years. 

" For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even 

so them also which sleep in Jesus will God 

bring with him."— 1 Thess. 4: 14. 



THE HOT WATER BOTTLE. 



" The luxuries of to-day become the necessities of to-morrow." 

It has not been long since physicians began the 
use of that which now is a common-place necessity 
in every household, — ^the hot water bottle, at first 
used only in special cases of shock or hemorrhage 
after some serious or prolonged surgical operation, to 
add heat to the body or assist in restoring heat equi- 
librium; to-day the hot water bottle has many uses in 
the home, and especially is it valued by those whose 
duties call them away from home and constantly 
changing of beds during the changeable months of 
the autumn and winter. Their uses become at once 
apparent in any condition in which the external ap- 
plication of heat is indicated. They are to be rec- 
ommended to such persons as habitually retire for 
the night with cold feet. One of these bottles, filled 
with hot water and placed in the bed, soon restores 
warmth to the parts. For elderly persons, in whom 
the vital powers are lowering, they will be found to 
be a luxury if used in this manner. The hot water 
bottle has many uses which become apparent upon 
reflection. 



Year] 



FA_M;1LY ^LIVrA^lSTA^O. 



(f 



[1898. 



GENTBNNIflL RLMflNflG FOR 1898. 

THE SUN IS CALLED THE KULING PLANET THIS YEAR 

The Year in General.— The Solar year is 
dry throughout, a little damp, and tolerably warm. 

Spring.— Will be temperate, in the beginning 
tolerably humid, especially in April it will be very 
changeable; May will be pleasant and dry, but near 
its close it will be chilly with frost, hence the sheep 
should be kept off the grain, and as much as pos- 
sible from the meadows. 

Summer.— June will not be too secure from 
frost, besides it will be very dry. The beginning of 
August will be windy, afterwards clear and calm. 
The days will be hot, but the nights cool. The 
Summer in general will be pleasant, yet it will end 
with tempestuous weather. 

Fall and Winter.— Will be agreeable, dry and 
fine; frost and freezing will be early, yet the cold 
will be moderate; rough, unpleasant weather in the 
beginning, which will soon change for the better. 
February will begin with pleasant weather, and 
end very cold, which will continue in March. 

Spring Crops.— Must be sown as early as pos- 

Ember Days: March 2d, June 1st, September 21st, December 21st 

The year 5659 of the Jewish Era commences at Sunset September 16th, 1898. 
The year 1316 of the Mohammedan Era begins on the 22d day of May 1898. 

MOVABLE FESTIVALS. 

Septuagesima Sunday, February 6th. 
Sexagesima Sunday, February 13th. 
Quinquagesima Sunday, February 20th. 
Shrove Tuesday, February 22d. 
Ash Wednesday, February 23d. 
Palm Sunday, April 3d. 
Easter Sunday, April 10th. 

THE FOUR SEASONS OR CARDINAL POINTS. 

EASTERN STATES. CENTRAL STATES. WESTERN STATES. 

Spring begins Marcli 20tli, at 9 o'clock, 8 o'clock, 20 min., 7 o'clock, 40 nain., 

Bummer begins June 21st, " 5 " 4 " 20 " 3 " 40 " 

Autumn begins Sept. 22d, " 7 " 6 " 20 " 5 " 40 " 

Winter begins Dec. 21st, «• 2 " 1 " 20 " 12 " 40 " 



sible. Barley and oats will grow very slowly, yet 
good in grain. But few peas and beans, unless 
planted in well manured, moist ground. Flax and 
hemp will be thin and short. Very little hay. Sheep 
should be kept from the pasture early in the Spring. 
Aftermath will be good. Cabbage and turnips 
will be poor on account of drought. 

Fall Crops.— The yield of wheat and crop will 
be small, but the quality, very good. Suffer no 
sheep on the grain in the Spring. 

Fall Seeding.— The Fall sowing should be put 
in deep, so that in the following hard winter it will 
notfreeze out; not necessary to sow very early. 

Fruit. — Pears will yield better than apples. 
Cherries, nuts, quinces and acorns, abundant. Corn, 
buckwheat, rice, and tobacco will grow well. Pota- 
toes, cabbage and turnips, middling. 

Grape Culture.— If in the preceding year 
grapes did not yield well they will do well this 
year, for Mars, the Sun, and Venus following, 
make every seven years a good wine year. 



Ascension Day, May 19th. 

Whitsuntide, May 29th. 

Trinity Sunday, June 5th. 

Corpus Christi, June 9th. 

Sundays after Trinity are 24. 

First Sunday in Advent, November 27th. 



MANITOBA. 
7 o'clock, 25 min., A. M. 
3 " 25 " A.M. 
5 " 25 " P. M. 
12 " 25 " P. M, 



flnatomu of Man's Bodu, as said to be governed bu the Twelve Constellations. 



77i6 Head and Face. 
^ Aries. 

Arms. 
j^ Gemini. 

Heart. 
<m. Leo. 

Reins. 
)^ Libra. 



lugns. 
^ Sagittarius. 

Legs. 
^ Aquarius. 




Neck. 
^ Taurus. 

Breast. 
v^ Cancer. 

Boivels. 
^l Virgo. 

Secrets. 
c|g Scorpio. . 

Knees. 
^ Capricorn. 

The Feet. 
2^ Pisces. 



lit:^'^All the calculations m this Almanac are made to Solar or Apparent Time. To this add the equatien in the Houi 
Table wlien the Sun is "slow-' and subtract it when "fast," for mean or clock time. L. J. Heatwole, 

Dale Enterprise, Rockingham Co., Virginia, 



^ 



Brethren s Family Alma?iac. 



ONE OF OUR STRONG MEN. 



In a beautiful valley, upon an elevated spot, and 
near the Rocky Ridge church, Frederick Co., Md., is 
a substantially-enclosed old cemetery, largely repre- 
sented by those who lived in former days. A few 
steps from the entrance we turned our face, toward 
the headstone that marks the resting place of one 
who once actively moved among us, and greatly en- 
deared himself to all who knew him, because of his 
untiring zeal in the work of the Master and his 
church. As we slowly approached the sacred spot a 
sensation of feeling which we will not attempt to de- 
scribe, arose within us. Through the silent tears 
that filled our eyes we slowly read the following epi- 
taph, deeply engraved upon the stone: 

Here Lie the Remains of 

ieIjId. id. IP. s.A."yXjO:R, 

Founder of Monocacy Church, 

Born June 23, 1811, 
Died June 6, 1885, 

Aged 

73 years, 11 months and 13 days. 



Faithful in life, triumphant in death, 
Gone home to the God he loved to adore. 

Eld. Saylor was born in Frederick County, Md., 
June 23, 181 1, connected himself with the church of 
the Brethren at Beaver Dam, Md., Aug. 20, 1837, was 
elected to the ministry, Sept. 30, 1840, and ordained 
elder May 7, 1850. 

The history of the life-work of this strong man of 
God, who proved himself, in intellectual power and 
zeal, far above the ordinary standing of men, would 
prove very interesting to the reader, but space would 
not admit, therefore we can only refer to a few facts 
connected with his life. 

Bro. Saylor lived and labored in the church in an 
age when to be a Dunker preacher meant sacrifice 
and labor. He related to me that, when he was 
elected to the ministry, one of his greatest crosses 
was, to wear the beard. The church urged the pro- 
priety of him letting the beard grow. He was a little 
slow in accepting that part and troubled himself con- 
siderably about it. 

At that time Bro. Saylor conducted the milling 
business. He concluded one day to take the matter 
to the Lord in prayer. He secured the place for this 
prayer far back among the machinery of the mill. 
He earnestly prayed to God to give him power to 
overcome. Just then, in the midst of all those noisy 
cog-wheels, he heard, quite audibly, a voice saying, 
"Daniel, the virtue lies in the doing of it." He de- 
clared he never after that had any trouble in wearing 
the beard. 



He traveled extensively over a large scope of 
country, helping to organize and build up churches. 
He, with old Bro. Umstead, a man filled with the 
Holy Ghost and with power, would start up into the 
Valley of Virginia and remain as long as three months 
from home. At that time traveling was done by pri- 
vate conveyance. Bidding farewell to home and all 
its duties, and committing all into the hands of his 
family, as a farewell address he would say, " Now, as 
the time belongs to the Lord, I cannot say when I will 
return." Thus he would go, always expecting to 
meet his own traveling expenses. 

Bro. Saylor was one of the church's strong repre- 
sentatives during the war, in defense of her peace 
principles, and was frequently called up before the 
war department, to give an explanation of those en- 
dearing principles. By his extraordinary power he 
was the means of the release of some of our Brethren 
from a life of war. Peace be to his ashes! 

D. F. Stouffer. 



HISTORY OF THE WOLF CREEK CHURCH, 
MONTGOMERY CO., OHIO. 

The Wolf Creek church is situated in the north- 
western part of Montgomery County, and the north- 
eastern part of Preble County. It is about ten miles 
wide and twelve miles long, and contains about one 
hundred square miles. Among the earliest settlers 
were the Brethren, who came while Ohio was yet a 
territory. The Bersts, Bakers, Cripes, Diehls, Nise- 
wongers, Shocka, Ulricks and Wogomans were prom- 
inent among the earliest members in this part of the 
Miami Valley. 

All was under one organization, — the Miami 
church, — until Oct. 18, 181 1, when a committee of 
four elders from the East was called to settle the 
difficulties in which the officials were largely in- 
volved, and which threatened the life of the church 
on the Miami. The names of these elders were. 
John Garber, Martin Garber, Jacob Staley and Fred- 
eric Klein. The church committed everything into 
their hands, and promised to abide by their decision. 
The trouble was investigated, a decision made, full 
satisfaction rendered, and the Miami church divided 
into four churches, the Wolf Creek church being the 
northwestern division. At that time it included all 
north of the Dayton and Western Road, and west of 
the Old Stillwater Road, — an unlimited territory, but 
having the limited number of about twenty-five 
members only. It was under the care of Eld. Daniel 
Cripe, a resident elder, assisted in the ministry by 
Bro. D. Ulrich. 

The meetings were held in the houses and barrs of 
the members until the year 1837, when the first house 
of worship was built in the center of the district. It 



r Is 



1st Month.] 



dflNUflRY. 



[Days 31. 



Daijs & Weeks 



1 Sat. 



HO 



20 



Remarkable 
Days. 



%^. 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



WOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 
S D. 



Ne7v Year \ 8| 7 13|12 50jjp|^13 



ftspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu 



Son I s■u■3^T 
Slow Rises & Sets. 
M |h. M. I H. M. 



$ in S- ^ in Peri.^| 4|7 23!4 37 



1] Sunday after New Year. 



Matt. 2. 



Day's length 9 hours 14 min. 



2 Sunday 

3 Mond'y 

4 Tues. 

5 Wed. 

6 Thurs. 

7 Friday 

8 Sat. 



21 

22 
23 
24 
25 

26 

27 



Abel Seth 

Enoch 

Methuselah 

Simon 

Epiphany 

Isidor 

Erhard 



8 


7 58 


1 58 


fP*26 


9 


8 46 


3 1 


m 9 


10 


9 36 


4 27 


^22 


11 


10 26 


5 32 


m 5 


12 


11 17 


6 30 


*»19 


12 


morn. 


([ rises 


« 3 


1 


12 7 


6 10 


«18 



© in Perihelion 
Sirius souths 11 40 
(J in Apogee 
d W C- % so. 1 27 
d ? inferior 
^^7.Ceclips.vis. ^ 
^pOrionso. 10 31 



4 


7 23 


5 


7 23 


5 


7 22 


6 


7 22 


6 


7 21 


7 


7 20 


7 


7 20 



37 
37 

38 
38 
39 
40 
40 



2] 1st Sunday after Epiphany. 



Luke 2. 



Day's length 9 hours 20 min. 



9 Sunday 


28, 


10 Mond'y 


29 


11 Tues. 


30 


12 Wed. 


31 


13 Thurs. 


J 


14 Friday 


2 


15 Sat. 


3 



Julian 
PauVs Imp. 
Eugene 

Menno Simon's 

Renunciation 1536 

Menno Simon 

died 1561 

Felix 
Maurice 



12 

1 
2 
3 
3 
4 
5 



55 
41 
26 
10 
54 
39 
25 



7 32 

8 40 

9 34 

10 25 

11 14 
morn. 

12 30 



^ 3 
^18 
^ 3 

^5% 2 
^^ It) 
« 



Arcturus rises 9 24 
d ?$ 

^ Great. Hel. L^t.N. 
Rigel souths 9 81 S 

15.7*80. 7 54 



7 


7 19 


8 


7 19 


8 


7 18 


9 


7 18 


9 


7 17 


9 


7 17 


10 


7 16 



41 
41 
42 
42 
43 
43 
44 



3] 2d Sunday after Epiphany. 


John 2. 


Day's length 9 hours 28 min . 


16 Sunday 


4 


Marcellus 


7 


6 17 


1 36 


«13 


If rises 5 10 


10 


7 15 


4 45 


17 Mond'y 


5 


Anthony 


8 


7 12 


2 54 


«26 


5 stationary 


10 


7 14 


4 46 


18 Tues. 


6 


FranMin h. 


9 


8 12 


3 40 


m 9 


d lit C- d T? C 


11 


7 13-4 47 


19 Wed. 


7 


Sarah 


10 


9 16 


4 35 


#^22 


Pollux souths 10 30 


11 


7 12 


4 48 


20 Thurs. 


8 


F. Sebastian 


11 


10 21 


5 28 


^ 4 


CinPer.Qent.^ ^ 


11 


7 12 


4 48 


21 Friday 


9 


Agnes 


12 


11 24 


6 22 


^16 


J|||? rises 6 20 


12 


7 11 


4 49 


22 Sat. 


10 


Vincent 


1 


12 23 


C sets 


^28 


'l^p'22. ecl.invis. 


12 


7 10 


4 50 



4] 3d Sunday after Epiphany. 



Matt. 8. 



Day's length 9 hours 40 min. 



23 Sunday 

24 Mond'y 


11 
12 


25 Tues. 


13 


26 Wed. 


14 


27 Thurs. 


15 


28 Friday 

29 Sat. 


16 
17 



Emerenth 

Timothy 

PauVs Conv 

Polycarpus 

F. Chrysost. 

Charles 

Valerius 



2 


1 17 


6 40 


^10 


3 


2 7 


7 35 


^22 


4 


2 54 


8 40 


S£ 4 


4 


3 39 


9 38 


2£l6 


5 


4 23 


10 39 


3^28 


6 


5 8 


11 40 


f?*10 


7 


5 53 


morn. 


ff*22 



Orion souths 9 23 
1( stationary 
Regulus rises 6 46 S 
Spica rises 11 17 
Aldebaran so. 7 40 
7-'' sets 6 54 
29. Sirius so. 9 53 



12 


7 9 


1,S 


7 8 


13 


7 7 


13 


7 6 


13 


7 5 


13 


7 4 


13 


7 3 



51 
52 
53 

54 
55 
56 
57 



51 4th Sunday after Epiphany. 



Matt. 8. 



Day's length 9 hours 54 min. 



30 Sunday 

31 Monday 



Adelgunda 



Virgil 



40 
30 



12 45 
1 50 






Rigel souths 8 24 
% souths 1 38 



147 

147 



58 
59 



MOON'S RMASELS. 



EASTERN STATES. 

Full Moon, 7th, To'clock 26 min. Even. 
Last Quarter, 15th, 10 " 46 " Morn. 
New Moon, 22d, a " 27 " Morn. 
First Quarter, 29th, 11 " 37 " Morn. 



CENTRAL STATES. 

6 o'clock 46 min. Even. 
10 " 06 " Morn. 

1 " 47 " Morn. 
10 " 57 " Morii, 



WESTERN STATES. 
6 o'clock 06 min. Even. 
9 " 26 " Morn. 
1 " 07 " Morn. 
IQ " 17 " Morn, 



Q 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



9 



was known and called the " Dutch " meeting by the 
neighbors, as all the services were conducted in the 
German language until that time, and the greater 
part in that language for ten years longer. The Ger- 
man language has not been used much since 1879. 

The meetinghouse, built in 1837, was enlarged with 
kitchen attachment in 1856. In 1870 this was super- 
seded by building the big meetinghouse across the 
road. In 1872 the Eversole meetinghouse was built 
in the southern part of the congregation. In 1886 
the Wolf Creek and the Salem districts built one in 
Arlington, on the line between the two churches. 
Meetings are held regularly at each place. 

The following is a list of the ministers of the Wolf 
Creek church to present date. Those marked with a 
star were elders, and these with a dagger had also 
served as deacons before elected to the ministry: 
*Daniel Cripe, 181 1-28; Jacob Shively, 1814-20; D. 
Ulrich, 181 1-25; *Emanuel Flory, 1820-30; *Michael 
Landis, 1822-33; *Samuel Pfoutz, 1830-43; *tChristly 
Arnold, 1834-55; *tAbraham Erbaugh, 1840-72; 
*tJoel Wogoman, 1844-78; *tSamuel Murray, 1847-51; 
*tSamuel Garber, 1852-81; jSamuel Bock, 1855-65; 
George Sala, ; Stephen Miller, ; Ezra Gil- 
bert, ; John Wrightsman, ; *tJacob Garber, 

1870, ; tJohn Kimmel, 1872-81; jHenry Garber, 

1879-81; *Conrad Brumbaugh, 1879-81; Simon Mike- 
sell, 1880-82; *tJohn Calvin Bright, 1881, ; fSamuel 

Horning, 1882, ; jGeo. Erbaugh, 1882, . Of 

the above, brethren Cripe, Flory, Murray, Bock and 
Sala moved to Indiana and spent years of service in 
the Master's cause. Bro. Jacob Garber had labored 
for years in the Bear Creek church as a deacon, and 
seven years as a minister, before moving into the 
Wolf Creek church. 

The following also served in the office of deacon. 
Those marked with a star are still at work: Martin 
Weybright, John Cripe, Jacob Cripe, Joseph Flory, 
David Sayler, Christly Kinsey, Jacob Musselman^ 
John Arnold, Henry Heiter, Joseph Arnold, John 
Ruse, David Hull, Jacob Kinsey, Abraham Grabill, 
Isaac Erbaugh, David Kimmel, John Kimmel, Dan- 
iel Kreider, Hiram Whiting, A. P. Erbaugh, *Jacob 
Kimmel, *Emanuel Brumbaugh, *William Gilbert, 
*Noah Eby, *Henry Stoner. Bro. John Arnold had 
been elected to the ministry in 1832, but as he could 
not read, he asked to be excused, and said he was 
willing to serve as a deacon. This was granted in 
1834, when his brother. Squire C. Arnold, was elected. 
From 1831, for several years. Eld. David Bowman, 
Sen., of the Bear Creek church, had the oversight of 
Wolf Creek. 

Councils. — A general council was held in this 
church in the fall of 1840, Sept. 4 and 5, by permis- 
sion of the Annual Meeting of the preceding spring. 
In 1862 the Annual Meeting was held at the same 



place of the former meeting, on the old Hay farm, 
with Bro. Kline as Moderator, and brethren Saylor 
and Quinter as Clerks. In December, 1880, there 
was a large council held in the Big meetinghouse, 
called by the Miami Valley elders who were not sat- 
isfied with the disposition made of their petition by 
the Annual Meeting the preceding spring. A large 
number of elders from various parts of the Brother- 
hood were present. The wise, conservative, judi- 
cious counsels of brethren Sayler, Quinter, R. H. 
Miller and Enoch Eby, and others, completely dis- 
comfited those who were anxious for separating, for 
the time being. 

Divisions. — This church has suffered considera- 
bly from divisions. In 1831-33 Eld. Michael Landis, 
with some ministers of adjoining branches of the 
church, caused a division. The principal points of 
difference were: They wanted lamb for the Lord's 
Supper, the single mode of feet-washing only, and a 
greater distinction in non-conformity in dress. They 
prospered for some years, then became divided 
among themselves, and have been for some years on 
a hopeless decline. They never erected houses for 
worship. They were put in avoidance and released 
therefrom by their own request. 

The later falling away was the so-called Old Order 
Brethren, from which nearly all the churches of the 
Miami Valley suffered. The author of the Petition 
of '80 and the Resolutions of '81 was a prominent and 
influential elder of this District, and with him went 
one elder, two ministers in the second degree and 
three deacons, with a total of one hundred and forty 
members. Our loss was greater than that of any 
other church in the Brotherhood. Their first Annual 
Meeting was held in this district in 1882. 

The first extended series of meetings was held in 
this church Feb. 19-26, 1882, by Eld. James Quinter. 
Sound doctrine that could not be gainsaid was 
preached in demonstration of the Spirit and power, 
uniting the members together with the bond of per- 
fectness, so necessrary after, witnessing the troubles 
the year before, and anticipating, at the time, the 
Progressive development. It was a most successful 
meeting. In 1886 we organized our first Sunday 
school. In the same year the church unanimously 
concluded to go back to the original mode of feet- 
washing, with the Supper on the table, according to 
the example and teaching of the Master and the in- 
spired pattern in that " upper chamber." 

Brethren and sisters of the Wolf Creek church, we 
have naught whereof to boast, but for what the grace 
of God has done for us, and the spirit of peace dwell- 
ing in our midst. Let us thank God and take cour- 
age, and "run with patience the race set before us." 

John Calvin Bright, 



2d Month.] 



FEBRUf\RY, 



Days & Weeks 



Remarkable 
Days. 



^i 


MOON 


MOON 


Moon's 


ra ^ 


Souths. 


Rises & Sets 


Signs. 


II 


11. M. 


H. M. 


S D. 



ftspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu 



[Days 28. 

Slow Rises & Sets. 
M JH. M. 1 H. M. 



1 Tues. 

2 Wed. 

3 Thurs. 

4 Friday 

5 Sat. 



20 
21 

22 
28 
24 



Ignatius 

Candlemas 

Blasius 

Veronica 

Agatha 



9 


8 20 


2 54 


^ 


10 


9 10 


3 53 


7?»14 


11 


10 1 


4 53 


*J^2^ 


11 


10 50 


5 50 


«11 


12 


11 37 


6 41 


..^26 



([inApogee.d^^ ^ 
Orion souths 8 44 
Arcturusris 9 48 '^ 
$ in Aphel. $ in S 
71 souths 3 38 



14 6 


59 


14 6 


58 


14 6 


57 


14 6 


56 


1416 


55 



6] Septuagesima Sunday. 



Matt. 20. 



Day's length 10 ho ;is 10 min. 



6 Sunday 


7 Mond'y 


8 Tues. 


9 Wed. 


10 Thurs. 


11 Friday 


12 Sat. 



25 Dorothea 
26'Richard 

27 Solomon 

28 Apollonia 
29!Scliolastica 

30 Euphrosina 

31 Gilbert 



12 


morn. 


([rises 


<i*lll 


1 


12 23 


6 15 


^^26 


2 


1 8 


7 30 


^11 


3 


1 52 


8 45 


^26 


3 


2 37 


9 59 


^11 


4 


3 24 


11 10 


^26' 


5 


4 14 


morn. 


«io 



6. Sirius s, ' 
^Rigel so. 7 43 
Aidebaran so. 7 i 
11 rises 9 20 ' 

Spica rises 10 11 



L7 


14 


6 54 


3 


14 


6 53 


s 


15 


6 52 




15 


6 51 




156 50 




15 6 48 




15 6 47 



6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

13 



7] Sexagesima Sunday. 



Luke 8. 



Day's length 10 hours 26 min. 



13 Sunday 

14 Mond'y 

15 Tues. 

16 Wed. 

17 Thurs. 

18 Friday 

19 Sat. 



F 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



F. Castor 

Valentine 

Faustin 

Julianus 

Constantia 

Concordia 



7, Susanna 



6 


5 7 


7 


6 4 


8 


7 5 


9 


8 7 


10 


9 9 


11 


10 8 


12 


11 3 



12 28c|ig23 /g^l3. 7-'' so. 5 55 

1 35^ 6|\tLc5}i{([. ?inAph. 

2 35lg|f$19d ? superior 

3 30;^ 2_Reguiusso. 12 4 ^ 

4 10i^l4([ in Perigee 

5 8j^26dc?C 

5 52 A 8d § C- enters. aS^ 



1516 46 5 

146 44'5 

146 

146 

14'6 

146 

14'6 



42 
41 

39 

38 



14 
16 
17 
18 
19 
21 
22 



8] QUINQUAGESIMA SUNDAY. 



Luke 18. 



Day's length 10 hours 44 min. 



20 Sunday 


8 


21 Mond'y 


9 


22 Tues. 


10 


23 Wed. 


11 


24 Thurs. 


12 


25 Friday 


13 


26 Sat. 


14 



Eucharius 

Eleonora 

SliroveTues. 

Ai<h Wedn. 

SL Matthew 

Victorinus 

Jeremiah 



1 


12 1 


2 


12 42 


2 


1 29 


3 


2 14 


4 


2 59 


4 


3 46 


5 


4 33 



20. d ? C 

7^* sets 12 48 
% souths 2 23 
Spica rises 9 25 
Capel^a souths 6 32 



([ sets ^20 

6 32^;^ 2 

7 25S^13 

8 24'3^25 

9 20^ 7 

10 25^19 

11 36^ 7 2 Great. Heh Lat. S. 13 



|14 

il4 
14 



14 
13 



37 
36 
34 



335 
325 
315 
295 



23 
24 
26 

27 
28 
29 
31 



9] First Sunday in Lent. 



Matt. 4. 



Day's length 10 hours 54 min. 



27 Sunday 

28 Mond> 



15Leander 
16 Romanus 



5 22lmorn. 

6 I2I12 40 



^ 8 



ikVega rises 11 8 
#•28. ^Stationary 



6 28 

6 27 



32 
33 



EASTEKN STATES. 



IVIOOIM'S PHASES. 

CENTRAL STATES. 



WESTERN STATES. 



Full Moon, 6th, 1 o'clock 2^\ min. Even. 

Last Quarter, 18th, 7 " 37 " Even. 

New Moon, 20th, 2 " 42 " Even. 

First Quarter, ^,8th, 6 " 15 " Morn. 

Venus is in superior conjunction with the Sun on the 15th and-changes'from morning star to 

evening star. 



12 


o'clock 46 min. Even. 


12 


o'clock 06 min. Even 


6 


" 57 •' Even. 


6 


17 " Even 


2 


" 02 " Even. 


1 


22 " Even 


5 


" 35 - Morn. 


4 


55 " Morn 



vT 



Brethre^is Fa?nily Almanac. 



1 1 



A PECULIAR FASHION. 



In China one sees many peculiar customs among 
the people, but none are more distressing than that 
of arresting the growth of the feet in childhood, so 
that when the girl baby has grown to womanhood 




she may shine in the highest ranks of fashion and 
aristocracy, because of the smallness of her feet. In 
early childhood, when the bones and cartilage are 
soft, the feet are bandaged and compressed in such a 



way that growth is impossible. For several years 
the process is said to be extremely painful, and the 
little victim to the demands of custom and fashion 
can only cry and moan in agony until the feet be- 
come wasted and bloodless, and insensible to pain. 
The accompanying photograph of a Chinese lady's 
foot shows that all the toes, ex- 
cept the great one, are turned un- 
der and are to be seen only on the 
sole of the foot. Notice, too, how 
the heel and the sole of the foot 
have been pressed together until 
the member is disfigured and dis- 
torted out of all semblance of the 
natural foot. At Hong Kong I 
purchased several pairs of shoes, 
such as are worn by the ladies of 
that country. The inner measure 
is exactly three inches in length, 
and at the heel, the widest part 
of the shoe, an inch and a quar- 
ter in width. The shoe tapers to 
a point like the most fashionable 
tooth-pick shoes, now so general- 
ly worn in our own country. 

The Chinese women, whose feet 
are deformed, as before described, 
find it a very difficult matter to 
walk, and many of them must be 
carried from place to place by 
servants. Their "golden lilies," 
as they call their feet, are so de- 
formed and weak that they can- 
not bear the weight imposed up- 
on them. We saw several of 
them trying to walk, and their 
steps were as short and as un- 
steady as those of a child taking 
its first lessons in walking. It 
will be understood that this fash- 
ion prevails only among the rich 
Mandarins, a wealthy, office-hold- 
ing caste, and that the common 
people appear to have too much 
good sense to follow this hurtful 
and ridiculous fashion set by the 
upper class. 

In our own civilized and Chris- 
tianized country we wonder how 
people can be so silly as to fol- 
low such senseless and injurious 
fashions as prevail in heathen 
lands. There is no accounting 
for taste in fashion. The Chinese compress their feet 
and Christians compress their waists by tight lacing. 
Of the two evils eminent physicians do not hesitate 
to say that the latter is by far the most injurious to 



.# 



3d Month. 


] 






Mf\RGf1 


, 




;Days 31. 


Days & Weeks 


CO 


Remarkable 


^5 


MOON 
Souths. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 


Moon's 
Signs. 


Aspects of Planets, and 


Sun sxjisr 
Slow Rises & Sets. 




S^ 


Days. 


H 


H. M. 


H. M. 


S. D. 


Other Miscellany 


M 


|H. M. 1 H. M. 


1 Tues. 


17 


St. David 


8 


7 2 


i 45 


5^22 


([in Apogee. d^C ^ 


13 


6 25 


5 35 


2 Wed. 


18 


Emherday 


9 


7 62 


2 44 


« 6 


D b rs 


12 


6 24 


5 36 


3 Tlmrs. 


19 


Samuel 


9 


8 42 


3 32 


«20 


14. souths 1 49 


12 


6 23 


5 37 


4 Friday 


20 


Adrian 


10 


9 29 


4 20 


■ifC 4 


Sirius souths 7 38 


12 


6 21 


5 39 


5 Sat. 


21 


Frederick 


11 


10 16 


4 56 


<gfl9 


Spica rises 8 48 


12 


6 20 


5 40 



10] 2d Sunday in Lent. 



Matt. 15. 



Day's length 11 hours 20 min. 



6 Sunday 


22 i 


7 Mond'y 


23 


8 Tues. 


24 


9 Wed. 


25 


10 Thurs. 


26 


11 Friday 


27 


12 Sat. 


28 



22iFridolin 
Perpetua 
Philemon 
Prudence 
Apollonius 
Ernestus 
Gregory 



12 


11 2 


5 20 


^ 4 


12 


11 47 


5 58 


^19 


1 


morn. 


([ sets 


^ 5 


1 


12 33 


7 36 


^20 


2 


1 20 


8 40 


« 4 


3 


2 10 


9 36 


«18 


4 


3 310 44 


m 2 



^ Great. Hel. Lat S. 
Castor souths 8 13 
^^8. I^I station, ffi 
Wc5KC 

□ WO 

Regulus souths 10 34 
Vega rises 10 25 



11 


6 19 


11 


6 18 


11 


6 16 


11 


6 15 


10 


6 13 


10 


6 12 


10 


6 11 



41 
42 
5 44 
45 

47 
48 
49 



11] 3d Sunday in Lent. 



Luke 11. 



Day's length 11 hours 38 min. 



13 Sunday 

14 Mond'y 

15 Tues. 

16 Wed. 

17 Thurs. 

18 Friday 

19 Sat. 



M 



Macedon 
Zachariah 
3 Christopher 
4Cyprianus 
5\SL Patrick 

6 Anshelmus 

7 Josephus 



4 


3 59 


11 48 


^16 


5 


4 59 


morn. 


^29 


6 


6 1 


12 25 


^11 


7 


7 1 


12 56 


^23 


8 


8 


1 45 


^ 5 


9 


8 55 


2 30 


^1^ 


10 


9 46 


3 45 


^29 



d ijt ([• 7* sets 1134 
([ in Per.igee.dT^C ^ 

15.0rions.l2 28 

d^0 
Aldeb. sets 11 37 
Spica rises 8 



9 


6 10, 


9 


6 8 


9 


6 7 


9 


6 6 


8 


6 4 


8 


6 3 


8 


6 2 



50 
52 
53 
54 
5 56 
5 57 
5 58 



12] 4th Sunday in Lent. 




John 6. 




Day's length 11 hours 58 min. 


20 Sunday 


8!Matrona 


11 


10 34 


4 35>SS^10 


0ent^.i^|>plf,h*,Sr^- 


8 


6 


6 


21 Mond'y 


9 Benedictus 


12 


11 21 


6 20 


S2<22 


b stationary © 


7 


5 59 


6 1 


22 Tues. 


10 


Paulina 


1 


12 6 


C sets 


fP* 4 


^i|22. d ? c 


7 


5 58 


6 2 


23 Wed. 


11 


Eberhard 


1 


12 51 


7 22 


f?*16 




7 


5 57 


6 3 


^u.j 24 Thurs. 


12 


Gabriel 


9 


1 37 


8 20 


ff*28 


% souths 12 17 


7 


5 55 


6 5 


25 Friday 


13 


Ann. V. M. 


3 


2 25 


9 12 


^10 


(?1^0. §inS 


6 


5 54 


6 6 


26 Sat. 


14 


Emmanuel 


4 


3 13 


10 28 


^23 


d ? ? 


6 


5 53 


6 7 



13] 5th Sunday in Lent. 






Johns 




Day's length 12 hours 14 min. 


27 Sunday 


15 


Gustavus 


5 


4 3 


11 40 


^ 6 


Sirius sets 11 12 


6 


5 52 


6 8 


28 Mond'y 


16 


Gideon 


6 


4 54 


morn. 


^19 


C in Apogee, d W C 


5 


5 51 


6 9 


29 Tues. 


17 


Eustatius 


6 


5 44 


12 32 


« 2 


Pollux so. 7 6 r\ 


5 


5 49 


6 11 


30 Wed. 


18 


Guido 


7 


6 33 


1 40 


v«15 


^m30. ^inPerihel. 


5 


5 48 


6 12 


31 Thurs. 


19 


Detlaus 


8 


7 21 


2 25 


«29 


^Rigelsetsl0 58 


4 


5 45 


6 15 



EASTERN STATES. 



ivioofM's f>mase:s. 

CENTRAL STATES. 



WESTERN STATES 



Full Moon, 8th, 
Last Quarter, 15th, 
Mew Moon, 22d, 
First Quarter, 30th, 



4 o'clock 21 min. Even. 
9 " 30 " Morn. 

5 " 23 " Even. 
9 " 07 " Even. 



3 o'clock 41 min. Even. 


3 o'clock 01 min. Even. 


8 " 50 " Morn. 


8 " 10 " Morn. 


4 " 43 " Even. 


4 " 03 " Even. 


8 " 27 " Even. 


7 " 47 " Even. 



.TuPTTER is in opposition with the Sun on the 25th, and shines all night. 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



13 



the health of the devotee of fashion. The feet are 
deformed by the Chinese, but the more important or- 
gans of the body are not interfered with. The Chris- 
tian, by tight lacing, compresses, deforms and dis- 
places the vital organs, and ill health, suffering, and 
a broken constitution, result. These evils fall not 
only on those who indulge in the hurtful fashion, but 
upon unborn generations. A comparison of the fol- 
lies, excesses, and injuries entailed, by following the 
goddess of fashion is fully as favorable to the heathen 
as to the Christian. D. l. m. 



SAMUEL W. HOOVER. 



BY HIS SON, O. PERRY HOOVER. 

Samuel W. Hoover was born April 16, 1837, near 
Liberty, Montgomery Co., Ohio. There thirty years 
of his life were spent on the farm. The pioneer log 
schoolhouse was his college, yet this meager ad- 
vantage enabled him to build a modest super- 
structure of practical education. Jan. 26, i860, he 
was married to Catharine Basore, who survives him. 
This sketch must be too short to relate more than a 
few bare facts. Let the flowers that bloomed in his 
life be preserved in the memory of his friends; let 
their varied colors recall the forgotten deeds of kind- 
ness of which the pen is silent; let their fragrance 
remind all that the influences of a well-spent life live 
on in the lives of others. 

In August, 1882, he entered the ministry of the 
Brethren church. Though now well advanced in 
years, he took into the pulpit the energy of youth, 
and an indomitable spirit to press on into larger use- 
fulness. His voice gave no uncertain sound. 
"Growth," "progress," "development," — these were 
the key-words of his discourses. He saw clearly the 
needs of the church in missionary, benevolent and 
educational lines, and set to work at once to create 
sentiment in favor of advancement. His most active 
ministry was spent in the West Dayton Brethren 
church. 

In church council he was prompt and fearless in 
asserting the right of individual opinion. He made 
no boast of his independence, yet he was, in the full- 
est sense, independent. His wisdom and keen sense 
of justice fitted him especially to be an arbitrator. 
He advocated strongly the principle of arbitration 
and the law of Matt. 18: 15-17. Many were the times 
that he was called to adjust some unpleasant case in 
family or church, and rarely did he fail to reach an 
amicable settlement. Thus he was a true lawyer. 

The day previous to his death was spent in work 
of this kind. He returned home at night with a hap- 
py heart because he had brought peace to an un- 
happy family. Exhausted in strength though he 



was, he yet willingly prepared for the morrow's serv- 
ices, which proved to be too much for his mortal 
powers. 

He was best known to the Brotherhood through 
his connection with the Book and Tract Work, and 
since its consolidation, as a member of the General 
Mission Board. General Conference located the 
Work at Dayton, Ohio, but without any means to be- 
gin operations. Sentiment was not yet ripe for this 
movement. Solicitors were appointed, but acted too 
slowly or failed altogether. Money was the first 
thing needed. Accordingly, after many discourage- 
ments and failures, a few dollars were secured from 
the "Gentiles." This fact is not generally known. 
The real beginning will some day be written in the 
light of its success; then the church will wonder why 
she hesitated to support it liberally from the start. 

There was no plan of operation, no sentiment of 
support, no endowment, no literature, — these had to 
be created. How well that was done, its progress 
testifies! The sphere of the Tract Work might yet be 
considerably contracted, had he not, as foreman, with 
the other committeemen, given it his fullest support. 
Viewing it in the light of its origin and success, it 
proves that, in any department of religious work, suc- 
cess may always be counted on, when men work with 
God. 

He had a wide circle of friends, who will remem- 
ber him for his genial, social nature. It was not 
learning, or wit, or brilliancy that won friends, but a 
humor peculiar to himself. Children were his first 
friends, in whom he took delight. If he was ever too 
jovial, it was because a nature like his must find ex- 
pression in humorous moods, as well as in the solem- 
nity of the pulpit. He frequently indulged in that 
humor which makes life sunnier and religion more 
human. Youth, he thought, should dwell immortal 
in the aged frame. 

As a preacher he delighted in the work of the pul- 
pit, though he was no sermonizer. Most men would 
have considered themselves too old to begin the 
work of the ministry, but he began with the vigor of 
youth. His fixed habits, because of age, were against 
acquiring ease and grace of manner. What he 
lacked in these he supplied in practicability, for if he 
was not practical, he was nothing. His methods 
were his own. Most of his subjects were taken from 
the Gospels or Paul's writings, — Paul's being his 
favorite. ■ During the earlier years of his ministry he 
conducted revivals, and met with fair success. He 
did no revival work after becoming a member of the 
General Missionary Board. 

At the time of his death, he was managing grand- 
father's farm, president of two business houses, mis- 
sionary committeeman, and pastor of the West 
Dayton church. The one word which expresses best 
the sum of his characteristics is action. He did 




4tli Month.] 



f\PRIL. 



[Days 30. 



Days & Weeks 



CO 



Remarkable 
Days. 



H 



MOON I MOON 
Souths, poises & Set 
H. M. H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu 



Suo 
Slow 
M. 



Rises & Sets. 
H. M. I H. M. 



1 Friday 

2 Sat. 



20 
21 



Theodore 
Theodosia 



9 
10 



8 7 
8 53 



58 
17 



^13 

^28 



1^ souths 11 38 
Sirius sets 10 54 



5 45 
5 44 



6 15 
6 16 



H] Palm Sunday. 



Matt. 21. 



Day's length 12 hours 34 min. 



3 Sunday 

4 Mond'y 


22 
23 


5 Tues. 


24 


6 Wed. 


25 


7 Thurs. 


26 


8 Friday 

9 Sat. 


27 
28 



Ferdinand 

Ambrosius 

Maximus 

Zaccheus 

Maundy T. 

Good Frid. 

Prochorus 



11 


9 38 


3 49 


^13 


11 


10 23 


4 17 


^28 


12 


11 10 


4 54 


^% 13 


12 


morn. 


prises 


^5% 28 


1 


12 1 


7 50 


<«12 


2 


12 53 


9 4 


«36 


2 


1 50 


10 27 


#^10 



Orion sets 11 24 ffi 
Regulus souths 9 4 

6.dGr,H.Lat.S. 

'Ant. rises 10 33 
7* sets 10 2 
([ in Perigee, d l^t ([ 



42|6 
416 
40j6 
39,6 
37,6 
366 
35 6 



18 
19 
20 
21 
23 
24 
25 



15] Easter Sunday. 



Mark 16. 



Day's length 12 hours 52 min. 



10 Sunday 

11 Mond'y 


29 
30 


12 Tues. 


31 


13 Wed. 


A 


14 Thurs. 


2 


15 Friday 

16 Sat. 


3 
4 



Easter Sun 

Easter Mon. 

Eustachius 

Justinus 

Tiburtius 

Olympia 

Calixtus 



3 


2 51 


11 30 


m"^^ 


4 


3 54 


morn. 


m 1 


5 


4 56 


12 20 


^19 


6 


5 5-5 


12 55 


^ 1 


7 


6 51 


1 27 


^13 


8 


7 43 


1 56 


^.25 


9 


8 31 


2 23 


S 1 



dT?C. ?Gr.Elong.E 
T? rises 11 30 ^ 

Vega rises 8 56 
/^13.Spi.so. 1150 
ItpAldeb sets 9 55 
Rigel sets 10 1 
$ rises 2 30 



1 


5 33 


1 


5 32 


1 


5 31 
5 30 


1 


5 28 


1 


5 27 


1 


5 25 



6 27 
6 28 



29 
30 
32 
33 
35 



16] 1st Sunday after Easter. 



John 20. 



Day's lensrth 13 hours 10 min. 



17 Sunday 


5 


18 Mond'y 


6 


19 Tues. 


7 


20 Wed. 


8 


21 Thurs. 


9 


22 Friday 


10 


23 Sat. 


11 



Rudolph 

^neas 

Anicetus 

Sulpitius 

Adularius 

Cajus 

St. Georqe 



10 


9 17 


2 50 


a^i8 


11 


10 2 


3 46 


ff* 


12 


11 6 


4 12 


ff«12 


1 


12 18 


]) sets 


f?*24 


2 


12 54 


8 40 


^ 1 


2 


1 16 


9 48 


^20 


3 


1 56 


10 45 


^ 8 



d c? ([. 

d ? 2 

% souths 10 19 



1.20.5sta.ors'^ 



d$C 
Orion sets 



10 6 





5 24 




5 23 




5 22 




5 21 




5 20 




5 19 


2 


5 18 



6 36 
6 37 
6 38 
6 39 
6 40 
6 41 
6 42 



17] 2d Sunday after Easter. 



John 10. 



Day's lenofth 13 hours 24 min. 



24 Sunday 

25 Mond'y 

26 Tues. 

27 Wed. 

28 Thurs. 

29 Friday 

30 Sat. 



12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



Albert 

MarJcEvan 

Cletus 

Anastasius 

Vitalis 

Sybilla 

Eutropius 



3 


2 46 


11 10 


^16 


4 


3 36 


11 52 


^29 


5 


4 26 


morn. 


^€12, 


6 


5 14 


12 29 


«26| 


7 


6 


1 4 


^101 


8 


6 45 


1 48 


^M 


8 


7 29 


2 25 


^ 8 



d tJJ C ? ill S 

(J in Apogee ^ 

Sirius sets 9 24 

Antares rises 9 36 
i|N28. 7"^ sets 8 44 
Pl/ souths 9 37 

S in Perihelion 



1716 
166 
156 



13 

11 

10 

9 



43 
44 
45 
47 
49 
50 
51 



EASTERN STATES. 



IVIOOISI'S F>MASCS. 

CENTRAL STATES. 



Full Moon, 6th, 4 o'clock 2 1 min. Even. 
Last Quarter, 18th, 9 " 30 » Morn. 
New Moon, 20th, 5 " 23 " Even. 
First Quarter, 28th, 9 " 07 " Even. 



WESTERN STATES. 



3 o'clock 41 min. Even. 


3 o'clock 01 min. 


Even. 


8 " 50 » Morn. 


8 " 10 " 


Morn. 


4 " 43 " Even. 


4 " 03 " 


Even. 


8 " 27 " Even. 


7 " 47 " 


Even. 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



15 



nothing slowly. The powers of an athlete were giv- 
en t© him, but they were wasted in overwork until 
the pink of health was gone forever. He was not 
overtaken by old age or infirmity; he was not ripe 
for the grave. He was growing into larger useful- 
ness. He saw the cause growing to which he had 
given his best thought,— the benevolent institutions, — 
and was glad. 

He had often expressed a desire to die in active 
service, but never did he suppose that his would be 
a tragic end, for God had erected a pulpit for his 
death-bed. On that last Sunday, March 10, 1895, he 
preached in the morning. The afternoon was spent 
in hard study, for the evening service, in communion 
with God. What his prayers were none will ever 
know, but God answered them strangely and tragic- 
ally. He entered upon that memorable service some- 
what weary, but with a. glowing spirit. "Whatsoever 
a man soweth, that shall he also reap," was the text. 
As he neared the end of the discourse his words be- 
came prophetic. "One by one we are passing over," 
were spoken and, in an instant, his great soul stepped 
into the eternal world. 

What a change of audience! Angels instead of 
mortals! His sermon was to be completed in the 
"temple not made with hands," or, rather, a new one 
of joy and praise begun. He left no farewell, for 
"God took him and he was not." 

His burial awaited the arrival of the writer from 
the University of Leipzig, Germany. Two weeks 
later his body was laid in the silent tomb. 



TOILET HINTS. 



Every woman owes it to herself and her family to 
look as well as she can, and one of the prime factors 
of beauty is a good complexion. We cannot always 
retain the rosebud coloring that belonged to sweet 
sixteen but there are many matrons of thirty-five, who 
look fully ten years oMer, because they have not 
taken the proper care of themselves. A morning 
bath^in water cool enough to be invigorating, but not 
cold enough to chill the body, is not only necessary 
for cleanliness, but is a great beautifier as well. This 
is quickly accomplished by wringing a towel out of the 
water and going over the body as rapidly as possible. 
Then rub with a dry towel, until the flesh is all in a 
glow. Avoid cosmetics. They may improve your 
appearance for a time, but they clog the pores of the 
skin, and will certainly prove injurious if persisted 
in.. Many a woman has ruined a good complexion 
in this way. Eat plain, wholesome food, avoiding 
preserves, rich pastry or cake, and fat meat. Exer- 
cise freely in the open air. A brisk walk one hour 
every day is necessary for those whose duties keep 
them closely confined the remainder of the time. 



Wash the face every morning, and at night just be- 
fore retiring, with good soap and hot water. Ivory 
soap is better for this purpose than the highly colored 
and perfumed toilet soaps, because of its purity, and 
its price places it within the reach of everyone. 
When thoroughly cleansed, rinse with clear water 
and dry with a soft towel. After washing at night, 
apply a mixture composed of equal parts of glycerine 
and rose water, rubbing it well into the skin. If the 
face is tanned from exposure to the sun and wind, a 
little lemon juice added to this lotion will whiten it, 
and is perfectly harmless. Cultivate a cheerful dis- 
position. Nothing is so destructive of good looks as 
constantly worrying over petty cares and trials, and 
while nervous women cannot entirely control this 
habit, many of them indulge in gloomy fancies more 
than the circumstances would warrant. — Work and 
World. ^^^^^^^ 

SOME WATER USES WELL TO REMEMBER. 

The Phrenological Journal gives the following 
useful hints on the applications of water in severe 
attacks of illness. The adult members of a family 
should keep th-em in mind for an emergency. 

A strip of flannel or a soft napkin, folded length- 
wise and dipped in hot water and wrung out, and 
then applied around the neck of a child that has the 
croup, will usually bring relief in a few minutes. 

A proper towel folded several times, and dipped in 
hot water, quickly wrung and applied over the site of 
toothache or neuralgia, will generally afford prompt 
relief. 

This treatment for colic has been found to work 
like magic. 

Nothing so promptly cuts short a congestion of the 
lungs, sore throat, or rheumatism as hot water, when 
applied early in the case and thoroughly. 

Hot water taken freely half an hour before bed- 
time, is an excellent cathartic in the case of constipa- 
tion, while it has a soothing effect upon the stomach 
and bowels. 

This treatment, continued a few months, with the 
addition of a cup of hot water slowly sipped half an 
hour before each meal, with proper attention to diet, 
will cure most cases of dyspepsia. 

Ordinary headaches almost always yield to the 
simultaneous application of hot water to the feet and 
back of the neck. — Scientific American. 



ELDER JOHN KLINE. 



John Kline was a farmer, a physician, an author, 
and a minister of extended and varied experience. 
Living on the homestead near the place of his birth, 
and having no children of his own, the farm furnished 
him and his wife an ample living, so that he was able 



5tli Month.] 



MfVY. 



[Days 31. 



Days & W66ksJ^§ 



Remarkable 
Days. 



"TO 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 
5igns. 
S. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 



sxjasr 

Rises & Sets. 
H. M. I H. M. 



18] 3d Sunday after Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length 13 hours 44 min, 



1 Sunday 


19 


Phil. & Jas. 


9 


8 14 


2 58 


^23 :d ? O inferior S ^ 


3 


5 7,6 53 


2 Mond'y 


20 


Sigismund 


10 


8 59 


3 15 


)^^ o 


If souths 9 24 


3 


5 66 54 


3 Tues. 


21 


Inv. of Cross 


10 


9 47 


3 50 


^gc^ JjO 


d li: C* ? in 8 


3 


5 5 6 55 


4 Wed. 


22 


Florianus 


11 


10 38 


4 10 


« 7 


11 sets 4 2 


3 


5 46 56 


6 Thurs. 


23 


Godard 


12 


11 34 


4 30 


«21 


^:^7* sets 8 17 


3 


5 36 57 


6 Friday 


24 


John Evan. 


1 


morn. 


([ sets 


m 5 


^^e.Spicaso.lO 22 


4 


5 26 58 


7 Sat. 


25 


Domicilla 


1 


12 35 


9 14 


^19 


C in Per. dlitC- dT?([ 


4 


5 16 59 



19] 4th Sunday after Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length 13 hours 58 min. 



8 Sunday 


26 


Stanislaus 


2 


1 39 


10 20i^ 2 


Sirius sets 8 38 ^ 


4 


5 


7 


9 Mond'y 


27 


Job 


3 


2 44 


11 2 


^15 


Rigel sets 8 30 


4 


4 59 


7 1 


10 Tues. 


28 


Gordianus 


4 


3 47 


11 48 


^27 


Aldebaran sets 8 17 


4 


4 58 


7 2 


11 Wed. 


29 


Mamertus 


5 


4 45 


morn. 


^ 9 


|v^ Orion sets 8 56 


4 


4 57 


7 3 


12 Thurs. 


30 


Pancratius 


6 


5 39 


12 18 


^21 


\||^12.T? souths 1 17 


4 


4 56 


7 4 


13 Friday 


M 


Servatius 


7 


6 29 


12 50 




5 station, ^ inAphel. 


4 


4 55 


7 5 


14 Sat. 


2 


Christian 


8 


7 16 


1 18 


S£l5 


11 souths 8 34 ~ S 


4 


4 54 


7 6 



20] 5th Sunday afte^ Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length 14 hours 12 min. 



15 Sunday 


3 


16 Mond'y 


4 


17 Tues. 


5 


18 Wed. 


6 


19 Thurs. 


7 


20 Friday 


8 


21 Sat. 


9 



Sophia 

Peregrina 

Venantius 

Liborius 

Ascension 

Torpetus 

Prudence 



9 


8 


1 42 


S27 


10 


8 44 


2 10 


fP* 9 


10 


9 29 


2 47 


ff«21 


11 


10 14 


3 20 


^ 3 


12 


11 2 


3 50 


^16 


1 


12 40 


([ sets 


^29 


2 


1 30 


8 41 


^12 



c^ rises 1 54 

If Gr. Hel. Lat. N. 

d$^ 

20.Spica S0.9 27 
Ant.ris.8 4.0ent./)5^ 



4 


4 53 


4 


4 52 


4 


4 51 


4 


4 50 


4 


4 50 


4 


4 49 


4 


4 48 



7 
8 
9 
10 
10 
11 
12 



21] 6th Sunday after Easter. 



John 15. 



Day's length 14 hours 24 min. 



22 Sunday 

23 Mond'y 


10 
11 


24 Tues. 


12 


25 Wed. 


13 


26 Thurs. 


14 


27 Friday 

28 Sat. 


15 
16 



Helena 

Desiderius 

Johanna 

Urbanus 

Beda 

Lucina 

William 



3 


2 21 


9 38 


*»25 


4 


3 9 


10 24 


m 9 


5 


3 56 


11 13 


«23 


5 


4 40 


11 48 


<ft V 


6 


5 24 


morn. 


<ff21 


7 


6 7 


12 15 


^ 5 


8 


6 50 


12 44 


^19 



^ in Apogee 
Rigel sets 7.26 
Arcturus souths 9 54 
F? souths 12 22 
^^11 stationary 
28. $inPerihel 



3 


4 47 


3 


4 46 


3 


4 46 


3 


4 45 


3 


4 44 


3 


4 43 


3 


4 43 



13 
14 
14 
15 
16 
17 
17 



22] Whitsuntide. 
29 Sunday 



John 14. 



Day's length 14 hours 34 min, 



Regulus sets 12 21 Q 
% souths 7 26 



30 Mond'y 

31 Tues. 



17 

18 
19 



Whit Sun. 

Whit Mon. 
Manilius 



9 


7 36 


1 10 


)^^ 3 


9 


8 24 


1 36 


J5^ 1 < 


10 


9 17 


2 4 


« 1 



4 42 
4 42 
4 41 



7 18 
7 18 
7 19 



IVIOOIM'S PHASES. 

EASTERN STATES. CENTRAL STATES. 

Full Moon, 6th, 1 o'clock 36 min. Morn. 12 o'clock 56 min. Morn. 

Last Quarter, 12th, 4 " 38 " Even. 3 " 58 " Even. 

New Moon, 20th, 8 " 00 " Morn. 7 " 20 " Morn. 

First Quarter, 28th, 12 " 16 " Even. 11 " 36 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 
12 o'clock 16 min. Morn. 

3 " 18 " Even. 

6 " 40 " Morn 
10 " 56 " Morn*. 



Saturn is in opposition with the Sun on the 30th and shines all night. 



Brethren s Family AlmaTiac, 



17 



to devote the most of his time to other pursuits. At 
the bed-side he administered the simple remedies of 
the Botanic system of medicine; and his practice 
largely grew out of his conviction that the sick 
needed his knowledge as medical adviser as well as 
his counsel for their spiritual benefit. 

He kept a diary of each day's transactions, his 
travels, texts, sketches of sermons, council-meetings^ 
Annual Meetings, journeys to and from, etc. He also 
wrote some essays, and some controversial matter, 
which was prepared by a friend for the press. As a 
minister, he was impressive. He possessed an oro- 
tund voice, a ready delivery, and a commanding 
presence. I saw him in the summer of 1848. He 
was then in his prime. He had come to my father's 
house to preach my grandfather's funeral. On the 
morning of the funeral service, he took a walk in the 
grove near by, and, as he returned, with thoughts 
aglow from communing with nature and nature's 
God, my. youthful eye surveyed his person and his 
manner, and that impression still remains. The per- 
sonal bearing of Benjamin Franklin before Parliament 
is not more worthy of a place in history than that of 
Eld. John Kline before an audience. The lucid man- 
ner in which he unfolded his subject, his calm and 
collected demeanor, his immense store of Scriptural 
knowledge, and his intimate acquaintance with hu- 
man nature, gave his Gospel ministry an influence 
that was immediate and lasting. Well do I remem- 
ber the climax of his sermon. It was a description of 
the judgment day. It was not imaginative. It was 
real. He gave the Scriptural account itself, word for 
word. Never was I more impressed with the force of 
Scripture narrative, and of the ever-enduring nature 
of religious discourse. 

He made extended journeys on horseback, going 
from church to church, and from house to house. 
He was not slow to push out into new fields, and 
many a place heard the Gospel for the first time in 
the person of Bro. Kline. He attended regularly the 
Annual Meetings of the church, extending his jour- 
neys for the purpose of preaching. It was during 
one of these tours that his wife received word of his 
death. She, in consequence fell into a state of men- 
tal imbecility, from which she never recovered. 

He was a wise and efficient counselor, faithful to 
every trust committed to him. He was a pillar firm- 
ly built in the temple of truth, and left the stamp of his 
life and character upon the church where he lived, and 
upon the brethren with whom he labored. His ad- 
vice to young ministers was to study the Bible with 
the view to sustain the doctrine and the principles of 
the church. 

During the Civil War, he continued to attend An- 
nual Meeting. He was a visible connecting link in 
the chain that bound the church together, though 
separated by the clash of contending armies. He 



thought not of personal danger. He considered it his 
duty to represent his District, and to assist in the 
work of Conference. During one of these meetings, 
Bro. D. P. Saylor, approaching him said, " Bro. 
Kline, you ought not to risk your life thus; we could 
not get along without you." 

On his way home from the Annual Meeting of 1864, 
I heard him preach for the last time. He was then 
in his sixty-seventh year. He had built better, had 
risen higher than he knew. He had ascended the 
mountain of life, and in the light of heaven from its 
summit was contemplating that " better country 
where the wicked cease from troubling, and the weary 
are at rest." With his faithful companions in travel, 
Solomon Garber, and two others, he passed on over 
mountains, along streams an4 waterfalls to his home 
in Rockingham County, Va. In a few days, about 
two miles west of his home, near the summit of a lit- 
tle ridge, he was found dead, having been killed by 
violent hands in the covert of the woods by the 
road side. Till life's shadows flee away, and the 
day of judgment dawns, a dark mystery hangs over 
and around the scene of his tragic death. Amid the 
lamentation of the people he loved, he was laid to 
rest in the Linville Creek Cemetery. At the head of 
his grave a plain marble slab bears the inscription: 

ELDER JOHN KLINE 

KILLED 

June 15, 1864, 

AGED 

66 years, 1 1 months and 28 days. 

When he was present, he was useful. 

When absent, wanted much. 

He lived desired, when killed lamented. 

Daniel Hays. 



SHARPSBURG, MD. 



This quiet, unpretentious town is situated in 
Washington County, Md., twelve miles south of 
Hagerstown, and about an equal distance north of 
Harper's Ferry. It is an historic town, noted chiefly 
for the bloody, but indecisive, battle fought in its 
suburbs and along the banks of Antietam Creek, 
Sept. 17, 1862. A national cemetery at the eastern 
end of town contains the mortal remains of 4,667 
Union soldiers. While probably an equal number 
of the opposing army fell victims to the cruel mon- 
ster, war, a much larger number were wounded, 
some of whom died subsequently, and others were 
maimed for life. 

It is conceded that more men were slain in a given 
time in this engagement than during any other battle 
during this war. Large shafts and monuments, nu- 
merous tablets and silent artillery mark the places 



6th Month.] 



JUNE. 



[Days 30 



Days & Weeks 




Remarkable 


0) TO 

5 ^ 


MOON 
Souths. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 


Moon's 
Signs. 


flsptcis of Planets, and 


Sun 1 sxjisr 
Slow Rises & Sets. 




!t^ 


Days. 


H 


H. M. 


H. M. 


S D. 


Other Miscellanu. 


M |h. M. 1 H. M. 


1 Wed. 


20 


Eiiiberday 


10 


9 17 


2 38 


«15 


}? souths 1148 r\ 


S^!4 40 


7 20 


2 Thurs. 


21 


Marcellus 


11 


10 15 


2 54 


«29 


^ Great Hel.Lat. S, 




4 40 


7 20 


3 Friday 


22 


Erasmus 


12 


11 18 


3 16 


#$13 


^^^(L 


2 


4 39 


7 21 


4 Sat. 


23 


Darius 


12 


morn. 


([rises 


^27 


^/4. ([ in Perig^ee 


2 


4 39 


7 21 



23] Trinity Sunday. 



John 3. 



Day's length 14 hours 42 rain. 



5 Sunday 24 

6 Mond'y 25 

7 Tues. 

8 Wed. 

9 Thurs. 

10 Friday 

11 Sat. 



26 

27 
28 
29 
30 



Bonifacius 


1 


Artemius 


2 


Lucretia 


3 


Medardus 


4 


Corpus Clir. 


5 


Flavins 


6 


Barnabas 


7 



12 
] 

2 

3 
4 
5 

5 



24 
29 
32 
30 
23' 
12 
58 



8 


52 


^10 


9 


38 


^22 


10 


14 


ih 5 


10 


44 


^1^ 


11 


10 


^^^9 


11 


50 


Sll 


mo 


rn. 


^23 



Arcturus so. 9 13 ^ 
Librae souths 10 10 
% souths 6 59 
Altair souths 12 46 
Antares souths 119 
Proc. s. 8 40 S 
1 .Reg.s. 1125 



38,7 
38,7 
377 
37,7 
37,7 
36,7 
367 



22 
22 
23 
23 
23 
24 
24 



24] 1st Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 16. 



Day's Icno^th 14 hours 48 min. 



12 Sunday 

13 Mond'y 

14 Tues. 

15 Wed. 

16 Tliurs. 

17 Friday 

18 Sat. 



Basilides 
Tobias 
Helisius 
3 1 Vitus 
4Rolandus 
^ St. Albans 
6 Arnolphus 



7 


6 43 


12 18 


^ 5 


8 


7 28 


12 521^17 


9 


8 13 


1 28^^29 


10 


8 59 


2 4 


^11 


10 


9 47 


2 45 


^24 


11 


10 37 


3 34 


^ "i 


12 


11 27 


(J sets 


^21 



Castor sets 10 8 
d WO 

dc?([ 

c^ rises 1 40 
Vesa souths 12 




52 






4 36 





4 35 


o 


4 35 


4 35 





4 35 





4 35 


1 


4 35 



24 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 



25] 2d Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 14. 



Day's length 14 hours 50 rain. 



19 Sunday 


7 


20 JVTond'y 


8 


21 Tues. 


9 


22 Wed. 


10 


23 Thurs. 


11 


24 Friday 


12 


25 Sat. 


13 



Gervasius 

Sylvarius 

Rapliael 

Achatius 

Agrippina 

John 2^ apt. 

Elogius 



1 


12 16 


2 


1 6 


3 


1 53 


3 


2 38 


4 


3 22 


5 


4 4 


6 


4 47 



9 


2« 4 


9 


32^.^18 


9 


58cgt 2 


10 


24(^16 


10 


49^ 1 


11 


10^16 


11 


38^ 



([ in Apogee 

$ sets 8 2 

Opnf »ii^ Longest day. 
^i-Lv. r"^ Summer begins. 

11 souths 6 
Regulus sets 10 34 
H sets 11 40 S 



1 


4 35 


1 


4 35 


1 


4 34 


2 


4 35 


2 


4 35 


2 


4 35 


2 


4 35 



25 
25 
26 
25 
25 
25 
25 



26] 3d Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 15. 



Day's length 14 hours 50 rain. 



26 Sunday 


14 


Jeremiah 


6 


5 30 


morn. 


^14 


^26. ^inPerihel. 
^Il/ in Aphelion 


4 


4 35 


7 25 


27 Mond'y 


15 


7 Sleepers 


7 


6 16 


12 10 


?^28 


3 


4 35 


7 25 


28 Tues. 


16 


Leo 


8 


7 5 


12 39 


«12 


Vega souths 12 4 


3 


4 36 


7 24 


29 Wed. 


17 


Peter&Paul 


9 


7 58 


1 2 


cff,26 


T? souths 9 50 


3 


4 36 


7 24 


30 Thurs. 


18 


Lucian 


9 


8 57 


1 40 


m 9 


d ? 0. d 41 C 


3 


4 36 


7 24 



IVIOOIM'S PHASES. 



EASTERN STATES. 
Full Moon, 4th, 9 o'clock 13 min. Even. 
Last Quarter, lith, 1 " 06 " Morn. 
New Moon, 18th, 11 " 21 " Even. 



Eirst Quarter, 2r)th, 11 



56 



Even. 



CENTRAL STATES. WESTERN STATES. 

8 o'clock 33 min. Even. 7 o'clock 53 min. Even. 

12 " 26 " Morn. 10th, il " 46 " Even. 
10 " 41 " Even. 10 " 01 " Even 



11 



16 



Even. 



10 



36 



Ever 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



19 



of the severest engagements. Other points of his- 
toric interest are " Burnside's Bridge," across Antie- 
tam, "Bloody Lane," and the "Dunker church." 
This meetinghouse is in the Manor congregation, is 
situated one mile north of town, and was built in 
1853. It stood within the lines of battle and was 
partly demolished by the batteries of both armies, as 
shown in the picture. 

After the battle it was used as a hospital for both 
the "blue" and the "gray," and is a silent witness of 
human carnage and inhuman warfare. The building 
was repaired in 1864, since which it is used regularly 
as a house of worship by our Brethren. The War 
Department proposed to purchase the house and 



come to visit the battle-ground, and the "green 
mound" where a loved one has been laid away. 

This meetinghouse is too small to accomm.odate 
the people, and, like many of our houses, too far 
from town for the townsfolk to attend worship. 
Measures are being taken to build a new church in 
the town. 

The principal or central meetinghouse of this con- 
gregation,— known as the "Manor" church, — was 
built in 1832 by brethren John Weaver and Peter 
Shamel. The Annual Conference of 1857 was held 
in this house. Bro. Shamel is still living, and nearly 
eighty years of age, but is able to attend public serv- 
ices. He has served as deacon for a number of 




SHARPSBURG MEETINGHOUSE. 



preserve it as a relic of this bloody event. The offer, 
however, was declined by our Brethren, believing it 
would serve a better purpose by using it as a place 
in which to worship the Prince of Peace and teach 
the doctrine of love and good will. A tablet has 
been placed on the outer wall, to the right of the 
door, by the Government, which gives a brief history 
of the meetinghouse and its connection with this bat- 
tle. This tablet is read by thousands of visitors who 



years. Previous to the building of the "Manor" 
house, this territory was a part of the "Beaver 
Creek" church (now presided over by Eld. D. F. 
Stouffer). Up to this date their bishops, who labored 
in this territory and presided over the flock were, 
Joseph Emmert, Jacob, Emmanuel and Isaac Long, 
and David Reichard. Bro. Emmert was an uncle of 
Eld. Joseph Emmert, of Arnold's Grove, 111., who 
was the grandfather of Sister Mary Stover, of India. 



7th Month.] 



JULY. 



Days & Weeks 



HO 



Remarkable 
Days. 



H 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 



[Days 31. 

Sun I sxj]sr 
Slow, Rises & Sets. 
M H M. I H. M. 



1 Friday 

2 Sat. 



19 
20 



Theobald 
Visit V. M. 



10 1 

11 7 



2 30 

3 1<S 



^22 



© in Aphelion 






44 
44 



36 
36 



7 24 
7 24 



27] 4th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 6. 



Day's length 14 hours 48 min. 



3 Sunday 

4 Mond'y 

5 Tues. 

6 Wed. 

7 Thurs. 

8 Friday 

9 Sat. 



21 

22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 



Cornelius 

Independ. 

Demetrius 

Jolin Huss 

Edulburga 

Aquilla 

Zeno 



12 


morn 


([rises 


^18 


1 


12 12 


8 17 


0h 1 


2 


1 14 


8 50 


^13 


3 


2 11 


9 14 


^25 


4 


3 3 


9 40 


^ "l 


5 


3 52 


10 1 


S;i9 


5 


4 39 


10 24 


ff* 



^^3. (J in Perigee 
^P^ souths 8 20 
Vega souths 11 32 
? Gr. Hel. Lat. N. 
Regulus sets 9 36 
% souths 5 6 S 

Spica sets 11 33 



4 


4 37 


4 


4 38 


4 


4 38 


4 


4 38 


5 


4 38 


5 


4 39 


5 


4 39 



23 

22 
22 
22 
22 
21 
21 



28] 5th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 5. 



Day's length 14 hours 42 min. 



10 Sunday 


28 


11 Mond'y 


29 


12 Tues. 


30 


13 Wed. 


J 


14 Thurs. 


2 


15 Friday 


3 


16 Sat. 


4 



J. Calvin^ h. 

Pius 

Henry 

Margaret 

Bonavent 

Apostles' da. 

Hilary 



6 


5 24 


10 48 


i?i*12 


7 


6 10 


11 4 


9^.^^ 


8 


6 56 


11 27 


^ ^ 


8 


7 44 


morn. 


^20 


9 


8 33 


12 30|^ 2 


10 


9 23 


1 14 


*»15 


11 


10 13 


2 10 


^29 



lO.Spi. s. 11 23 
Alt. so. 12 22 
Dog Days Begin 

6S(L 

Antares so. 8 14 

([ in Apogee ^ 



5 


4 40 


5 


4 40 


5 


4 41 


5 


4 41 


6 


4 42 


6 


4 43 


6 


4 43 



20 
20 
19 
19 
18 
11 
17 



29] 6th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 5. 



Day's length 14 hours 34 min, 



17 Sunday 


5 


18 Mond'y 


6 


19 Tues. 


7 


20 Wed. 


8 


21 Thurs. 


9 


22 Friday 


10 


23 Sat. 


11 



Alexius 

Maternus 

Ruffina 

Eli as 

Praxedes 

Mary Mag. 

Apollinar. 



12 


11 3 


3 20 


^€13 


1 


12 10 


(^ sets 


«27 


2 


12 50 


8 26 


^12 


2 


1 20 


8 44 


^27 


3 


2 4 


9 10 


^12 


4 


2 46 


9 42 


^26 


4 


3 29 


10 10 


^10 



Andromeda ris. 8 36 
18. eel. Inv. 
7* rises 12 22 

? s. 8 45. enters <gf 



6 


4 44 


6 


4 45 


6 


4 46 


6 


4 47 


6 


4 47 


6 


4 48 


6 


4 49 



16 
15 
14 
13 
13 
12 
11 



30] 7th Sunday after Trinity, 



Mark 5. 



Day's length 14 hours 22 min. 



24 Sunday 

25 Mond'y 

26 Tues. 

27 Wed. 

28 Thurs. 

29 Friday 

30 Sat. 



Christiana 
St. James 
St. Anna 
Martha 
16|Pantaleon 

17 Beatrix 

18 Upton 



5 


4 13 


10 40 


^^^ 25 


6 


4 59 


11 20 


m 9 


6 


5 50 


11 44 


«22 


7 


6 44 


morn. 


m 6 


8 


7 44 


12 20 


#J19 


9 


8 47 


1 10 


^ 2 


10 


9 51 


2 18 


^15 



Spica sets 10 27 
Antares souths 8 2 
, 26.1^ souths 4 4 

P Pollux sets 8 11 

d lit C. d 1? C 

T? sets 1 15 V^ 

?in2S 



6 


4 50 


6 


4 51 


6 


4 52 


6 


4 52 


6 


4 53 


6 


4 54 


6 


4 55 



10 
9 

8 
8 
7 
6 
5 



31] 8th Sunday after Trinity. 



Mark 8. 



Day's length 14 hours 10 min. 



31 Sunday |19|Germanus |11|10 59| 3 26|i^27|([ in Perigee 



6 4 56 7 4 



IVIOOIM'S RMASEIS. 



EASTEKN STATES. 
Full Moon, 3d, 4 o'clock 14 min. Even. 
Last Quarter, 10th, 11 " 45 " Morn. 
New Moon, 18th, 2 " 49 " Even. 
First Quarter, 26th, 8 « 42 " Morn. 



CENTRAL STATES. 

3 o'clock 34 min. Even. 

11 "05 " Morn. 

2 " 09 " Even. 

8 " 02 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 
2 o'clock 54 min Even. 
10 " 25 " Morn. 
1 " 29 " Even. 
7 " 22 " Morn. 



Brethren s Family AlTuanac. 



21 



He preached mostly in the German language. These 
faithful standard-bearers had all gone to rest before 
the roar of cannon resounded within the walls of this 
hallowed sanctuary. 

Bro. Samuel Mumma, — who donated and deeded 
the church lot to our Brethren, whereon the Sharps- 
burg house was built in 1852 or '53, — was born in 
1801. He was a relative of Eld. B. F. Moomaw, of 
Bonsacks, Va., and the father of M. Alice Mumma, 
now living in Sharpsburg. He was living within the 
lines of battle at the time of this engagement. His 
dwelling-house, barn and nearly every building, with 
most of their contents, were laid in ashes during the 
battle, leaving scarcely a change of raiment for his 
family. 

Elders Jacob Hibarger and David Long were the 
next to have charge of the flock at this place. The 
latter closed his labors early in this year (1897). It 
was not the fortune of the writer to know Eld. Hi- 
barger, neither have I access to his history. I often 
had the pleasure of sitting at the feet of Eld. Long, 
to hear his counsels and teachings. He was well 
known in our Brotherhood, having served frequently 
on the Standing Committee of our Annual Meeting 
and other important committees. He was a man of 
strong convictions, clear conception and excellent 
judgment. He reared a large family. Four of his 
sons, — Joseph, D. Victor, Orville and Walter, and 
three of his sons-in-law. Eld. Eli Yourtee, Seth Mey- 
ers and E. D. Kendig, are ministers in our Fraternity. 
His other son, — Minin, — is a successful school- 
teacher, which shows that his influence was felt at 
home, as well as abroad. The present ministers are, 
Daniel Wolf, Jacob Bricker, D. Victor Long and 
John Otto. 

During the war the Manor congregation numbered 
between three and four hundred members. It now 
numbers two hundred and forty. Since those dark 
days of war and devastation nearly one generation 
has passed away. Many have removed to other lo- 
calities, and the Hagerstown congregation has also 
taken a part of their territory and membership. 
They have extended their labors into West Virginia, 
where they have gathered in quite a number. While 
a goodly number of the Father's children began their 
pilgrimage in the Manor congregation, may it end in 
a land where the roaring of cannon and the rattling 
of musketry are unknown. S. F. Sanger. 



A FEW MOMENTS ASIDE. 



Not long ago we stood for a few moments with 
uncovered head in the corner of a little Ohio grave- 
yard. Afar from the busy walks of a crowded world, 
where the hum of traffic dies neither day nor night, 
in the quiet of God's own green country with the arms 



of the grand old trees near by, stretched in the silence 
of a perpetual petition toward heaven; here, in 
"God's acre," where vandals never come and irrev- 
erent feet seldom tread, sleeps one who did much for 
the cause he loved, — one whose life-work is telling 
for our church to-day as few lives can ever tell. 
Here, near the scene of his labors, beneath the blue 
sky which arched itself above his home, sleeps one 
who sacrificed time and means and self in the God- 
inspired effort to "send the light," — one who brought 
to his work the tribute of a cultured mind and a lov- 
ing heart, willing to spend and be spent in the Mas- 
ter's cause. 

As we read the name of Henry Kurtz, on the hum- 
ble headstone, and noted the fact that it commemo- 
rated a life which had flickered out in the dawning of 
the very year whose midsummer started us towards 
life's cloudland of mystery, dream and struggle, the 
question came, Why should one whom we had never 
seen, whose life fell short of touching ours, — why 
should such a life interest us? The verse on the tab- 
let answered: " Blessed are the dead which die in the 
Lord from henceforth: Yea, saith the Spirit, that they 
.may rest from their labours; and their works do fol- 
low themy 

Ah, that, indeed, is the answer. The life may fall 
short, but the works will touch many another life and 
testify to the strength of him who has "fallen on 
sleep," — and this is not to die. It is scarce to be 
wondered at, then, that one who used to regard it as 
almost a religious duty to read every article in the 
Messenger, should be interested in the life of him 
who started the first paper among the Brethren. No 
marvel that he should regard it as a sacred privilege 
to stand reverently by his grave, thankful that such 
an one had ever lived. 

Well would it be for us all, could we realize that 
our works will follow us, and that our life-work will 
be helping or hindering the ones that come after in 
the day when some one, perchance, shall stand over 
our grave and ask to know more of the life beneath 
the sod. 

From the grave we went down over the hill, and in 
a few moments stood by the ruins of the old house in 
which the printing-press had been. It was strange 
to think of a printing-press on a farm, several miles 
from post-office and the conveniences of town; but 
here, over the spring-house, the old Gospel Visitor 
had its birth, and the glorious pioneer struggle in de- 
fense of God's truth went on. On the bank, just 
above, stands the house full of precious associations, 
built in the first decade of the century. 

Returning to the home of Bro. J. F. Kurtz, we en- 
joyed the privilege of inspecting and hearing the 
pipe-organ which Father Kurtz brought from Ger- 
many. Its music to us seemed scarce inferior to that 
of many modern instruments of greater pretensions. 



8th Month.] 



f\UGUST. 



[Days 31. 



Daus & Weeks 






Remarkable 
Days. 



H 


MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 


Moon's 
Signs. 
S D. 



flspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 



San I sxj3sr 
Slow j Rises & Sets. 
M |h. M. i H. M. 



1 Mond'y 

2 Tues. 

3 Wed. 

4 Thurs. 

5 Friday 

6 Sat. 



20 
21 

22 
23 
24 



Lammas cVy 

Augustus 

Dominick 

Stephen 

Oswald 



"l^Tr. of Christ 



12 


morn. 


prises 


^.10 


1 


12 2 


7 30 


^.22 


2 


12 49 


7 58 


IS. 4 


2 


1 40 


8 20 


js^ie 


3 


2 29 


8 42 


S28 


4 


3 17 


9 14 


^ 9 



J|l. c?so. 7 50 ^ 
^^Vega so. 9 42 
Sirius ri»es 4 34 
Altair so. 10 48 S 
7"^' rises 11 10 
% souths 3 27 



64 


57 


64 


58 


64 


59 


65 





65 


1 


615 


2 



7 3 
7 2 
7 1 
7 
6 59 
6 58 



32] 9th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 16. 



Day's length 13 hours 56 min. 



7 Sunday 

8 Mond'y 

9 Tues. 

10 Wed. 

11 Thurs. 

12 Friday 

13 Sat. 



26, Godfrey 

27Emilius 

28Ericus 

29' /^^^. Laioren, 

30,Titus 

31, Clara 

A Hildebert 



5 


4 4 


9 15 


^211 


6 


4 51 


10 14'^ 8 


6 


5 39 


10 15 


^15 


7 


6 28 


11 8 


^27 


8 


7 18 


11 52 


^11 


9 


8 8 


morn. 


^24 


10 


8 58 


12 51 


« 7 



v^ stationary 

T? sta. 5 in Aphelion 
9. Spica s, 9 36 
$ rises 1 1 10 

(J in Apogee ^ 



5 


5 3 


5 


5 4 


5 


5 5 


5 


5 6 


5 


5 7 


5 


5 8 


5 


5 9 



57 
56 
55 
54 
53 
52 
51 



33] 10th Sunday after Trinity. 


Luke 9. 


Day's length 13 hours 40 min. 


14 Sunday 


2 


Eusebius 


10 


9 47 


1 58 


«21 


$inS 


5 


5 11 


6 49 


15 Mond'y 


3 


Assn, V. M 


11 


10 33 


2 44 


*f 5 


Antares sets 115 


4 


5 12 


6 48 


16 Tues. 


4 


Rochus 


12 


11 18 


3 38 


<fr20 


/fjl!k7* rises 10 28 


4 


5 13 


6 47 


17 Wed. 


5 


Bertram 


1 


22 2 


]) sets 


M 5 


IIP 17. $ so. 7 32 


4 


5 14 


6 46 


18 Thurs. 


6 


Agapetus 


2 


22 45 


7 15 


^20 


Orion rises 1 32 S 


4 


5 15 


6 45 


19 Friday 


7 


Sehaldus 


2 


1 28 


7 43 


'i^i^ «^ 


d u: c. d ? C 


4 


5 17 


6 43 


20 Sat. 


8 


Bernard 


3 


2 12 


8 10 


^20 


dKC 


3 


5 18 


6 42 



34] 11th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 18. 



Day's length 13 hours 24 min. 



21 Sunday 

22 Mond'y 

23 Tues. 

24 Wed. 

25 Thurs. 

26 Friday 

27 Sat. 



9|Rebecca 
10;Philibert 
llZaccheus 
l^St.BaHhol 

13 Ludovicus 

14 Samuel 

15 Gebhard 



3 


2 58 


8 38«;« 5| 


4 


3 47 


9 27 


«1^ 


5 


4 39 


10 14 


m 3 


6 


5 35 


11 8 


^17 


7 


6 35 


11 50 


m 


8 


7 37 


morn. 


^12 


9 


8 39 


12 50'^ 24 



d?([. Dog Days End 
□ 4t ©• ? stationary 
$ s. 8 40. ©enters^ 

24. dlilC. dc^W 

Spica sets 8 26 
% souths 2 18 



3 


5 19 


3 


5 20 


3 


5 21 


2 


5 22 


2 


5 23 


2 


5 24 


2 


5 25 



41 
40 
39 
38 
37 
36 
35 



35] 12th Sunday after Trinity. 



Mark 17. 



Day's length 13 hours 10 min. 



28 Sunday 

29 Mond'y 

30 Tues. 

31 Wed. 



16 
17 
18 
19 



St.Augustm 
St. John heh. 
Benjamin 
Paulinus 



10 


9 38 


1 52 


^ 6 


11 


10 34 


2 56 


^18 


12 


11 27 


3 58 


^ o| 


12 


morn. 


]) rises 


S12| 



([ in Perigee 
DbO-^Gr-Hel.Lat.S. 
Sirius rises 2 56 
^31. ^ in S S 



5 26 
5 28 
5 30 
5 31 



6 34 
6 32 
6 30 
6 29 



IVIOOIM'S RMASES. 



EASTEKN STATES. 
Full Moon, 1st, 11 o'clock 31 min. Even. 
Last Quarter, 9th, 1 " 15 " Morn. 
New Moon, 17th, 5 " 36 '•' Morn. 
First Quarter, 24th, 3 " 34 " Even. 
Full Moon, 31st, 7 ^^ 53 '• Morn. 



CENTKAL STATES.. 
10 o'clock 51 min. Even. 
12 " 35 ". Morn. 

4 •' 56 •' Morn. 

2 " 54 Even. 

7 " 13 Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 
10 o'clock 11 min. Even. 
8th, 11 "55 " Even. 
4 " 16 " Morn. 
2 " 14 " Even. 
6 " 33 ' Morn 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



Turning away from it all we thought of a more 
familiar grave by the Blue Juniata, and felt that it 
would be well for us to stray oftener to the spots that 
should be sacred in our memories, — not to mourn, 
but to rejoice that we have these places whence we 
may gather inspiration from godly lives now gone. 

"Such graves as theirs are pilgrim shrines — 
Shrines to no creed or code confined; 
The Delphian vales, the Palestines, 
The Meccas of the mind." 

The "young heart, hot and restless," is too prone 
to push along life's highway, unheeding these way- 
side shrirses, and losing much of the strength that 
might come from a quiet hour there, in the heat of 
the noonday glare; but the thoughtful spirit will ever 
prize them and the reverent heart can ne'er despise 
them. May God help us to be as faithful and true as 
the staunch, stout hearts that have gone before. 

Charles C. Ellis. 



HEALTHFULNESS OF THE BEDROOM. 

Is sufficient attention paid in every household to 
the great importance of having bedrooms well ven- 
tilated, and of thoroughly airing the sheets, coverlids 
and mattresses in the morning before packing them 
up in the form of a neatly-made bed? If two per- 
sons are to occupy a bedroom during the night, and 
try the experiment of weighing themselves when 
they retire, and again when they arise, they will find 
that their actual weight is at least 2i. pound less in the 
morning. Frequently it will be found that there is a 
loss of two or more pounds, and the average loss 
throughout the year will be a pound of matter, which 
has gone off their bodies, partly from their lungs and 
partly through the pores of the skin. The escaped 
matter is carbonic acid and decayed animal matter or 
poisonous exhalation. This is diffused through the 
air in part, and, what is more disquieting, part is ab- 
sorbed by the bedclothes. Hence the necessity of 
thoroughly ventilating bedrooms, and^ above all, of 
thoroughly and perfectly airing everything that goes 
to make up the bed. Mothers of famihes should 
look well to this. 



WHERE THE ANNUAL MEETINGS HAVE 
BEEN HELD. 



So far as we have been able to learn, the Annual 
Meeting has been held at the places designated be- 
low, and in the years given: 

1778 Pipe Creek, Md. 

i77q, May 30 Conewago, Pa. 

1780 Conestoga, Pa. 

1781 - Conestoga, Pa. 

1782, 

1783, June?, Pipe Creek, Md. 



784, 

785, May 15, Big Conewago. Pa. 



787, 



790, 
791, 
792, 
793. 
794, 
795, 
796, 
797, 
798, 
799, 
800, 
801, 
802, 
803, 
804, 
805, 
806, 
807, 
808, 



May 30, 
May 22, 



.... Conestoga, Pa. 
. . Big Conestoga, Pa. 
Schuylkill County, Pa. 



Oct. 20, 



Big Conewago, Pa. 
. Shenandoah, Va. 



Oct. 26, 
May 26, 



. . Black Water, Va. 
Little Conewago, Pa. 



Pipe Creek, Md. 



810, May 30, 
811 



Big Conewago, Pa. 



813, 
814, 
815, 
816, 
817, 
818, 
819, 
820, 
821, 
822, 
823. 
824, 
825, 
826, 
827, 
828, 
829, 
830, 
831, 
832, 
833, 
834, 
835, 



May 18, 
May 13, 



Chester County, Pa. 
. . Pipe Creek, Md. 
. . White Oak, Pa. 



May 19, 



. . . Big Conewago, Pa. 
. Lancaster County, Pa. 
Glade, Somerset Co., Pa. 
C'Snton, Ohio. 



. . . Morrison Cove, Pa. 
Washington County, Md. 
. . Augusta County, Va. 
.... York County, Pa. 



837, May 15. 

838, June 1, 

839, • • • • 
840, 



June 5, 
May 28, 
May 13, 
June 2, . 
May 24, 
May 9, . 
May 29, 
May 21, 
June 12, 



Pipe Creek, Md. 

Conestoga, Pa. 

. Rockingham County, Va. 
.... Juniata County, Pa. 
.... Stark County, Ohio. 

. Cumberland County, Pa. 

. . Schuylkill County, Pa. 

. Rockingham County, Pa. 

. Washington County, Md. 

. Huntingdon County, Pa. 

.... Morrison Cove, Pa. 
. . . Somerset County, Pa. 

Beaver Dam, Md. 

. . . Wayne County, Ohio. 

.... Big Conewago, Pa. 
. . . Roanoke County, Va. 

. . Lancaster County, Pa. 
. . . Franklin County, Pa. 
. . . Wayne County, Ohio. 
. . . Somerset County, Pa. 
Montgomery County, Ohio. 

. . . Augusta County, Va. 

. . . Elkhart County. Ind, 
Beaver Dam, Md, 

. , .4shla»d County, Ohio. 



9tli Month. 


] 






SEPTEMBER. 




;Days 30. 


Daus & Weeks 




Remarkable 
Days. 


H 


MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 


Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 


Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 


Sun s-cjiT 

Slow Rises & Sets. 
M. H. M. 1 H. M. 


1 Thurs. 

2 Friday 

3 Sat. 


20 
21 

22 


Egidus 

Eliza 

Mansuetus 


1 

2 
3 


12 17 
1 5 
1 54 


6 45 

7 11 
7 45 


2224? sets 8 32 ^ 
1^ 6 Orion rises 12 36 
^18 If souths 1 55 


1 


5 32 
5 34 
5 35 


6 28 
6 26 
6 25 



36] 13th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 10. 



Day's length 12 hours 50 min. 



4 Sunday 


23 


Moses 


3 


2 42 


8 40 


^ OSirius rises 2 42 


1 


5 36 


6 24 


5 Mond'y 


24 


Nathaniel 


4 


3 31 


9 20 


,^12'd ? ©inferior 


1 


5 37 


6 23 


6 Tues. 


25 


Magnus 


5 


4 20 


9 59 


^24 


Rigel rises 11 38 


2 


5 39 


6 21 


7 Wed. 


26 


Regina 


6 


5 11 


10 54 


^ ^ 


/^7.Aldeb.r.l0 28 


2 


5 40 


6 20 


8 Thurs. 


27 


Nat. V. M. 


7 


6 1 


11 52 


^19 


m.dWc 


2 


5 41 


6 19 


9 Friday 


28 


Bruno 


8 


6 52 


morn. 


« 2 


(J m Apogee, dc^fl n 


3 


5 43 


6 17 


10 Sat. 


29 


Pulcheria 


8 


7 40 


1 6 


«15 


T? souths 5 1 


4 


5 44 


6 16 



37] 14th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 17. Day's length 12 hours 32 min. 



11 Sunday 

12 Mond'y 

13 Tues. 

14 Wed. 

15 Thurs. 

16 Friday 

17 Sat. 



30 
31 

S 
2 
3 
4 
5 



Protus 

J, WicEife 

Amatus 

Elev.Holy^ 

Nicetus 

Euphemia 

Lambertus 



9 


8 28 


2 20 


«29 


10 


9 14 


3 12 


<f*14 


10 


9 58 


4 6 


*r29 


11 


10 41 


4 53 


^14 


12 


11 25 


(J sets 


^29 


1 


12 9 


6 46 


)^]^^^ 


2 


12 55 


7 8 


^^^29 



Vega souths 7 16 
Sirius rises 2 12 
Orion rises 114 
5 stationary, d $ C 

/fpkl5.Ant.s.912S 
^^7* rises 8 38 
D^Q.^inAph. dl|g 



46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
52 
53 



6 14 
6 13 
6 12 
6 11 
6 10 
6 8 
6 7 



38] 15th Sunday after Trinity^ 



Matt. 6. 



Day's length 12 hours 14 min. 



18 Sunday 


6 


19 Mond'y 


7 


20 Tues. 


8 


21 Wed. 


9 


22 Thurs. 


10 


23 Friday 


11 


24 Sat. 


12 



Siegfried 

Micleta 

Fausta 

Emherday 

Maurice 

Hosea 

StJohncon. 



2 


1 44 


7 58 


^M 


3 


2 36 


8 19 


«28 


4 


3 31 


9 7 


^12 


5 


4 30 


9 50 


^25 


6 


5 30 


10 52 


m 8 


7 


6 31 


11 48 


^21 


8 


7 29 


morn. 


^ 3 



% souths 1 8 

dT?([.?Gr.Elon.W,^ 

22.$Gr.Elon.E. 

WM fZ\ri ■ tVir Autumn Beg. 
pr \l)^-W^' D.&N. Equal 

(^ in Perigee 



6 


5 54 


7 


5 56 


7 


5 57 


7 


5 58 


8 


5 59 


8 


6 


8 


6 1 



6 
4 
3 
2 
1 

5 59 



39] 16th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 7. 



Day's length 11 hours 56 min. 



25 Sunday 


13 


Cleophas 


9 


8 24 


12 50 


^15 


y^ souths 4 5 


8 


6 2 


5 58 


26 Mond'y 


14 


Justina 


10 


9 17 


1 54 


^27 


$ sets 8 28 


9 


6 3 


5 57 


27 Tues. 


15 


Cosmus 


11 


10 17 


3 


S5 9 


tp stationary 


9 


6 4 


5 56 


28 Wed. 


16 


Wenceslaus 


12 


11 43 


4 59 


1,-1 , ( iJ X 


Aldebaran rises 9 12 


9 


6 6 


5 54 


29 Thurs. 


17 


St.Michad 


15 


morn. 


prises 


f^ 3 


^:X29. 7''' rises 7 50 


10 


6 8 


5 52 


30 Friday 


18 


Jerome 


1 


12 11 


5 42 


^15 


"^11 so. 12 27 S 


10|6 10 


5 50 



EASTEKN STATES. 



IVIOON'S F>IHASeS. 

CENTEAL STATES. 



Last Quarter, 7th, 5 o'clock 53 min. Even. 5 o'clock 13 min. Even. 

New Moon, 15th, 7 " 12 " Even. 6 " 32 " Even. 

First Quarter, 22d, 9 " 41 " Even. 9 *' 01 " Even. 

TuUMoon, S9th,(> " 12 " Even. 5' ♦« 32 '' Even. 



WESTERN STATES. 

Even 
Even 
Even 



4 o'clock 33 min 

5 " 52 " 
8 " 21 " 



52 



Even 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



2S 



1855, Huntingdon County, Pa. 

1856 Waddam's Grove, 111. 

1857, Washington County, Md. 

1858 Carroll County, Ind. 

1859 Somerset County, Pa. 

i860, Washington County, Tenn. 

1861 Rockingham County, Va. 

1862, Montgomery County, Ohio. 

1863, Blair County, Pa. 

1864, Wayne County, Ind. 

1865 Antietam church, Pa. 

1866, . Rock River, 111. 

1867, Carroll County, Md. 

1868, June 2, Elkhart County, Ind. 

1869, Millersburg, Va. 

1870, June 7 Waterloo, Iowa. 

1871 Lancaster County, Pa. 

1872, May 21 Wayne County, Ohio. 

1873, June 3, Meyersdale, Pa. 

1874, May 26 Macoupin County, 111. 

1875, May 18, Covington, Ohio. 

1876, June 6 Logan County, Ohio. 

1877, May 26, New Enterprise, Pa. 

1878, June II North Manchester, Ind. 

1879, June 3, Broadway, Va. 

x88o, June 5, Lanark, 111. 

1881, June 7, Ashland, Ohio. 

1882, May 30, Milford, Ind. 

1883, May 15, Bismark Grove, Kans. 

1884, June 3, Dayton, Ohio. 

1885, May 26 Mexico, Pa. 

1886, June 15 Pittsburg, Ohio. 

1887, May 31 Ottawa, Kans. 

1888, May 22, North Manchester, Ind. 

1889, June II Harrisonburg, Va. 

1890, May 27 Pertle Springs, Mo. 

1891, June 2 Hagerstown, Md. 

1892, June 7 Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

1893, May 23 Muncie, Ind. 

1894, May 29 Meyersdale, Pa. 

1895, June 4, Decatur, 111. 

1896, May 26 Ottawa, Kans. 

1897,. June 7 Frederick, Md. 

1898 

The above was submitted to Bro. Abram H. Cas- 
sel, who, after giving it a careful examination, writes: 
"I have good authority for saying that there never 
were Minutes for every year, neither was it (the Con- 
ference) called the Yearly or Annual Meeting, be- 
cause it was not held yearly, or annually, but only 
when there was occasion for one, and that was very 
seldom in the early history of the Brethren. The 
first one, of which I have any knowledge, was held in 
the Conestoga church about 1743, occasioned by 
Count Zinzendorf, to which George Adam Martin 
was sent as a delegate. Then we have no account of 
another ' Big Meeting,' as they were called, till about 
1760, when Christopher Sour, or Sower, gave occa- 
sion for one. But before the appointed time came, 
matters were satisfactorily adjusted, and so the pro- 
posed Big Meeting was recalled. 

They were generally called Big Love Feasts, when 
the adjoining churches and elders were invited, and 
then, if there were any difficulties of a general char- 
acter, that the individual churches, could not adjust, 



it was brought up either before or after the love 
feast. But quite often there was nothing brought, so 
the time was spent in worship, consequently there 
was nothing to place on the Minutes. That ac- 
counts, in part, for the many blanks you have on 
your list." 

From time to time there seem to have been a 
number of special councils. We are able to give the 
following only: 

1822, One at Canton, Ohio, and another in Montgomery County, 
same State. 

1835, Montgomery County, Ohio. 

1840, Montgomery County, Ohio. 

1845, Sept. 20 Elkhart, Ind. 

1846, Sept. 4, Washington County, Tenn. 

1848, Sept. 23 Delphi, Carroll Co., Ind. 

1851, Nov. 22, on account of the Far Western Brethren, in the 

Mill Creek church, Adams Co., 111. 

We shall be pleased to receive any corrections or 
additional information relatmg to this list. It is 
probably the most complete list of our Annual Meet- 
ings yet published, and should there be mistakes, 
and there doubtless are, we will regard it as a favor 
to be advised of them. j. h. m. 



A CURE FOR CANCER. 



A FRIEND sends the following from the Dunedin, N. 
Z., Evening Star: 

"A well-known settler at Moeraki, whose cheek and 
jaw were in a fearful state with cancer, was told by a 
medical man to go home and put his house in order, 
that nothing more could be done for him. Mr. Ed- 
ward Deboitt, of Moeraki, persuaded him to apply 
figs, which he did, and having persevered for five 
months he is perfectly cured, and has been pursuing 
his daily vocation for about six months. 

This was the treatment that cured him: Boil fine 
Turkey figs in new milk, which they will thicken. 
When they are tender, split and apply them as warm 
as they can be borne to the part affected, whether 
broken or not. The part must be washed with some 
of the milk every time the poultice is changed. Use 
a fresh poultice night and morning, and at least once 
during the day, and drink a quarter of a pint of the 
milk the figs are boiled in twice in the twenty-four 
hours.^ This must be persevered in for three or four 
months at least. The first application gives consid- 
erable pain, but afterwards each dressing gives relief. 
Should the part affected become black when using 
the poultice, do not be alarmed. It is a good* sign." 

We can see ao' harm in any man who has smoked 
and brought on cancer in the mouth, trying this rem- 
edy. It may cute. It is not a new medicine, for 
when King Hezekiah was nigh to death Isaiah said, 
" Let them t-ake a lump of figs and lay it for a plaster 
upon the boil, and he shall recover." (Isa. 38: 21.)— 
Safeguard. 



10th Month.] 



OCTOBER. 



[Days Sl.f 



Days & Weeks 



ho! Remarkable 

-<r'\ 



Days. 



MOON 
Souths. 
H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 



flspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanij. 



1 12 54| 6 24|^27|$ sets 8 25 ^ 10|6 11|5 49 



Sun I STunsr 
Slow Rises & Sets. 
M H. M. 1 H. M. 



1 Sat. 



19|Remigius 



40] 17th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 14. Day's length 11 hours 38 min. 


2 Sunday 


20 C, Columbus 


2 


1 20 


7 30 


^ 9 


? Gr. Hel Lat. N. 


11 


6 13 5 47 


3 Mond'y 


2l'jairu8 


3 


2 10 


8 14 


^21 


11 souths 12 23 


11 


6 145 46 


4 Tues. 


22 Franciscus 


4 


3 1 


8 58 


*» 3 


Rigel rises 9 57 


11 


6 155 45 


5 Wed. 


23Placidus 


5 


3 52 


9 40 


^16 


dWC 


12 


6 16,5 44 


6 Thurs. 


24 Fides 


5 


4 43 


10 34 


^29 ([ in Apogee ^ 


12 6 17 5 43 


7 Friday 


25 Amelia 


6 


5 33 


11 20 


)u^l2 f^7. Siriusr.l2 43 


12,6 195 41 


8 Sat. 


26,Pelagius 


7 


6 21 


morn. 


«25^4L(5c?([ 


12 6 20 5 40 



41] 18th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 22. 



Day's lengtL 11 hours 20 min. 



9 Sunday 
10 Mondy 


27| 
28 


11 Tues. 


29 


12 Wed. 


30 


13 Thurs. 





14 Friday 

15 Sat. 


2 
3 



27|Dionysius 
Gereon 
Burkhard 
Veritas 
Colomau 
Fortunata 
Hedwick 



8 


7 7 


12 4 


« 8 


9 


7 51 


1 20 


¥f22 


9 


8 35 


2 44 


^ 7 


10 


9 18 


3 50 


J^22 


11 


10 2 


4 48 


^^^ 7 


12 


10 48 


5 19 


J^^ 22 


12 


11 36 


(J sets 


m 7 



T^ souths 3 15 
? Gr.Hel.Lat. S. d$3Jt 
S souths 6 13 
Altair so. 9 34 Q 

Orion r. 10 28 

15. d$C. dl/([ 



13 


6 22 


13 


6 23 


13 


6 24 


14 


6 26 


14 


6 27 


14 


6 28 


14 


6 29 



38 
37 
36 
34 
33 
32 
31 



42] 19th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 9. Day's length 11 hours 02 i 


min. 


16 Sunday 


4 


Gallus 


1 


12 38 


5 54c«22:d?l^ 


14 


6 30 


5 30 


17 Mond'y 


5 


Florentina 


2 


1 23 


6 40 


m 7p$Q 


15 


6 32 


5 28 


18 Tues. 


6 


St. Luke^ ev. 


3 


2 23 


7 31 


IJ^21diitC* d?([ 


15 


6 33 


5 27 


19 Wed. 


7 


Ptolemy 


4 


3 24 


8 50^ 5 d ^ O superior ^ 


15 


6 34 


5 26 


20 Thurs. 


8 


Felicianus 


5 


4 25 


9 57j^l8$sets 8 10 


15 


6 35 


5 25 


21 Friday 


9 


Ursula 


6 


5 24 


11 4'^ 


^mi/ souths 11 24 
s^22. d$T? 


15 


6 37 


5 23 


22 Sat. 


10 


Cordula 


7 


6 20 


morn.'^12 


15 


6 39 


5 21 



43] 20th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 22. 



Day's length 10 hours 52 min. 



23 Sunday 

24 Mond'y 


11 
12 


25 Tues. 


13 


26 Wed. 


14 


27 Thurs 


15 


28 Friday 

29 Sat. 


16 
17 



Severinus 

Salome 

Crispin 

Amandus 

Sabina 

Simon Jude 

Zwlngliuh 



8 


7 13 


12 59 


^24 


9 


8 2 


1 60 


S 6 


10 


8 50 


2 52 


S£1B 


10 


9 37 


3 54 


fP* 


11 


10 24 


4 54 


ff«12 


12 


11 12 


5 56 


JP«24 


12 


morn. 


([rises 


^ 6 



T? so. 2 25.0 ent. c|g 
Aldebaran ris. 7 35 
Orion rises 9 25 S 
5in S 

$ Greatest Brilliancy 
r^ Rigel rises 8 25 
^29. 7* so. 1 24 



15 


6 40 


16 


6 41 


16 


6 42 


16 


6 48 


16 


6 44 


16 


6 46 


16 


6 47 



20 
19 
18 
17 
16 
14 
13 



44] 21ST Sunday after Trinity. 



John 4. 



Day's length 10 hours 26 min. 



30 Sunday 

31 Mondy 



Serapion 
Hallow Eve 



12 1 
12 52 



5 38U^18 

6 14|^ 



Antares sets 9 23 16 6 48 
? sets 7 50 16 6 50 



12 

10 



IVIOOIM'S RMASES. 



EASTERN STATES. 
Last Quarter, 7th, 1 o'clock 07 min. Even. 
New Moon, 15th, 7 " 39 " Morn. 
First Quarter, 22d, 4 " 11 " Morn. 
EullMoon, 29th, 7 ** 20 « Morn. 



CENTRAL STATES. 
12 o'clock 27 min. Even. 
6 " 59 " Morn. 
3 *' 31 " Morn. 
6 " 40 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 
11 o'clock 47 min. Morn 
6 " 19 " Morn 
2 " 51 " Morn 
6 " 00 " Morn 



JupjTER is in conjunction with the Sun on the 13th and cannot be seen. 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



ELD. JAMES R. QISH. 



In the city cemetery, at Roanoke, 111., rests 
all that is mortal of Eld. James R. Gish, He 
was born in Roanoke County, Va., Jan. 24, 
1826, and in the year 1849, the day after he was 
twenty-three years old, he was married to Bar- 
bara Kindig, of Augusta County, Va., who, at 
this date, is living near Roanoke, 111. In the 
fall of 1849 Bro. Gish and wife, in company 
with others, in a covered wagon, came to Ill- 
inois. They were six weeks on the road. Bro. 
Gish drove to a beautiful knoll, on what was 
known as Grand Prairie, looked over the thou- 
sands of broad, unoccupied acres, and said, 
"Barbara, we will drive our stake right here 
Here we can live and have all the free range 
for cattle just as long as we may want it." 
There he built his first residence. The free 
range did not last long, and on his farm the 
City of Roanoke has since been built. 

In 1852, he and his wife and six others were 
baptized. Four months later he was elected to 
the ministry, and the next year advanced to 
the second degree. In 1863 he was ordained 
to the eldership. 

By occupation Bro. Gish was a farmer, and 
from boyhood was noted for his sober and in- 
dustrious habits. In early life he was a great 
hunter, and many days did he spend among 
the mountains of Virginia, in the pursuit of 
game. Not a few of his leisure hours, how- 
ever, were spent in carving. In the year „i847 
he carved a beautiful staff, doing the greater 
part of the work on it while waiting for his 
horses to finish eating at noon. One side of 
the staff is shown in the accompanying engrav- 
ing. On the staff are neatly engraved twenty- 
eight different objects, including animals, men, 
birds and reptiles. The workmanship shows 
rare natural ability as an engraver, for he had 
no training whatever in the art. This staff is 
kept here at the Mount, and is often shown to 
visitors, who examine it with a good deal of in- 
terest. 

A short time before his death, which oc- 
curred April 30, 1896, Bro. Gish partly ar- 
ranged for the publishing of a New Testament, 
with the references following each verse. This 
arrangement was lately completed by Sister 
Gish, and the book will soon be ready for the 
market. So far as the reference department is 
concerned, it is probably the most convenient 
New Testament ever published. The money 
for bringing out the book was furnished by 
Brother and Sister Gish. Thousands of our 
readers will thank them for giving to the world 



the New Testament Scriptures in such a neat 
and convenient form. 

Bro Gish spent forty-four years in active 
ministerial labors, preaching, during that time, 
in not less than twenty-two States. He spent 
many years in mission work, and laid the 
foundation of not a few churches. The last 
nine years of his useful life were spent in Ar- 
kansas, in which State he closed his eyes in 
death. He was a man of noble moral and 
Christian qualities. He had strong convictions, 
and in his preaching never gave an uncertain 
sound. No one ever questioned his loyalty to 
the church, or doubted his sincerity, j. H. m. 



HEALTH SUGGESTIONS. 



Recommended by A. W. Vantman, M. D. 

Catarrh. — Many persons have a catarrh of 
the nose, in which crusts form, often causing 
bleeding when blown or picked out. If such 
persons would get ten cents' worth of good 
vaseline and have a little oil of bergamot 
mixed with it, and morning and evening apply 
to the inside of the nostrils with the little 
finger, as far up as possible, they will find 
much relief and often a cure. 

Baking Soda. — As a tooth powder it whitens 
the teeth and prevents decay. Applied to a 
decayed and aching tooth it will often relieve as 
if by magic Applied to the feet or armpits it 
is an excellent deodorant. In case of burns 
apply freely and bind on the affected part. It 
IS useful in the bath, especially in case of 
prickly heat. 

The Syringe, — Every family ought to own 
a syringe. A fountain syringe is the best. If 
properly used it will save many doctor bills. 
If a child has a colic, an ''njection of warm 
water will usually relieve it. In Cholera In- 
fantum or Cholera Morbus repeated injections 
of very warm water will give immense relief 
and often save life. In the majority of cases 
of constipation, the syringe is worth much 
more than pills. Injections of hot water will 
often cure a headache. 

Three to five different articles of food at one 
meal are sufficient. A great variety tends to 
cause overeating. Seldom do we regret having 
eaten too little. 

One of the small things to remember is, that 
alcohol will quickly remove an obstinate por- 
ous plaster whose period of usefulness has ex- 
pired, and w\|l 'also "^ cause all unsightly.^races 



of its use to^6isappear. 




4^0l3<jf 



11th Month.] 






NOVEMBEf=^. 




[Day 


s30. 


Daus & Weeks 




Remarkable 
Daus. 


w 

H 


MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 


Mooa'5 
Signs. 
S. D. 


Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 


Son 
Slow 
M. 


Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 1 H. M. 


1 Tues. 

2 Wed. 

3 Thurs. 

4 Friday 

5 Sat. 


20 
21 

22 
23 
24 


All Saints 
All Souls 
Theophilus 
Charlotte 
Malachi 


2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


1 43 

2 34 

3 24 

4 13 

5 


6 34 

7 51 

8 53 

9 58 
11 7 


«22 


? sets 7 20 ^ 

(J in Apogee 
f? souths 1 44 
? in Aphel. 6 S (L 


1 
16 
16 
16 


6 515 9 
6 52 5 8 
6 53 5 7 
6 54 5 6 
6 55 5 5 



45] 22d Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 18. 



Day's length 10 hours 10 min. 



6 Sunday 

7 Mond'y 

8 Tues. 

9 Wed. 

10 Thurs. 

11 Friday 

12 Sat. 



25 
26 

27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Leonard 

Engelbert 

Cecilia 

Theodore 

Ma7\ Luther 

MelancTiton 

Jonas 



7 


5 45 


morn. 


^IB 


7 


6 28 


12 20 


^ 2 


8 


7 11 


1 44 


^17 


9 


7 53 


2 38 


)^T^ ^ 


9 


8 38 


3 32 


lfyVl 


10 


9 24 


4 27 


« 2 


11 


10 15 


5 20 


Mile 



.^^ >6. 7* so. 12 51 
Sirius ris. 10 48 
$ souths 4 13 S 

Regulus rises 12 18 
Altair sets 118 
d ^ li{. $ stationary 



16 


6 56 


16 


6 57 


16 


6 58 


16 


6 59 


16 


7 


15 


7 1 


15 


7 2 



4 
3 

2 

1 



59 

58 



46] 23d Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 22. 



Day's length 9 hours 56 min. 



13 Sunday 


N 


Winebert 


12 


11 10 


([ sets 


m 


^^13.And. S0.8 44 


15 


7 3 


4 57 


14 Mond'y 


2 


Levin 


1 


12 9 


5 4 


^15 


Wd V C. d ? C 


15 


7 4 


4 56 


15 Tues. 


3 


Leopold 


2 


1 11 


6 20 


^29 


d T? ([. d $ C 


15 


7 5 


4 55 


16 Wed. 


4 


Ottomar 


3 


2 15 


7 31 


^13 


(^ in Perigee ^ 


15 


7 6 


4 54 


17 Thurs. 


5 


Alpheus 


4 


3 17 


8 50 


^26 


? sets 6 48 


15 


7 7 


4 53 


18 Friday 


6 


Gelasius 


5 


4 15 


9 59 


^ B 


d^b 


15 


7 8 


4 52 


19 Sat. 


7 


Elizabeth 


6 


5 9 


11 10 


^20 


T? souths 12 56 


14 


7 9 


4 51 



47] 24th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt 9. 



Day's length 9 hours 42 min. 



20 Sunday 


8 


21 Mond'y 


9 


22 Tues. 


10 


23 Wed. 


11 


24 Thurs. 


12 


25 Friday 


13 


26Sat. 


14 



Amos 

Off, V.MaJy 

Alphonsus 

Clement 

Chrisogenes 

Catharine 

Conrad 



7 


6 


morn. 




8 


6 48 


12 40 


Sl4 


9 


7 34 


1 50 


SK26 


9 


8 20 


2 59 


fP« 8 


10 


9 35 


4 22 


i!*20 


11 


10 55 


5 24 


m 2 


12 


11 45 


6 20 


^14 



20. d ? $ 
% so. 9 47 

7*80.11 47.0ent. 

Sirius rises 7 23 

d $ 1? 

? Gr, HeL Lat. 

Rigel rises 6 30 






s. 



14 


7 10 


14 


7 11 


14 


7 12 


13 


7 13 


13 


7 14 


13 


7 15 


12 


7 15 



4 50 
4 49 
4 48 
4 47 
4 46 
4 45 
4 45 



48] 1st Sunday in Advent. Matt. 21. Day's length 9 hours 30 min. 


27 Sunday 

28 Mond'y 

29 Tues. 

30 Wed. 


15 
16 
17 

18 


Josaphat 

Guntherus 

Saturn 

St. Andrew 


12 

1 

2 
2 


morn. 
12 17 
12 42 

1 18 


prises 

5 28 

6 10 
6 54 


^26 

^22 

« 5 


^r^27.Mar.so6 42 
^^T? souths 12 21 

dWc 

% souths 9 5 ^ 


12 
12 
11 
11 


7 16 
7 17 
7 17 

7 18 


4 44 
4 43 
4 43 
4 42 



IVIOON'S F»MASE3. 



EASTEKN STATES. 
Last Quarter, 6th, 9 o'clock 30 min. Morn. 
New Moon, 13th, 7 " 22 " Even. 
First Quarter, 20th, 12 " 07 " Even. 



Full Moon, 27th, U 



41 



Even, 



CENTRAL STATES. 

8 o'clock 50 min. Morn. 

6 " 42 " Even. 

11 " 27 " Morn. 



11 



01 " Even. 



WESTERN STATES. 

8 o'clock 10 min. Morn 

6 " 02 " Even 

10 " 47 " Morn 

10 " 21 " Even 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



29 



In a case of fainting, place the patient on a couch 
or level surface, with the head not elevated; give 
free access to fresh air, loosen clothing, sprinkle the 
face with cold water, and, with utmost care, apply 
smelling salts or ammonia to the nostrils. Careless- 
ness in the use of ammonia may cause serious injury 
to the delicate membranes of the nose, 

A much-praised corn salve is made as follows: 
Salicylic acid, half a dram; extract of Indian hemp, 
ten grains; and collodion, one ounce. Apply by 
means of a brush twice or thrice a day. 

Salt and water used on the hair is said to prevent 
its falling out; and used occasionally on the teeth, 
prevents the accumulation of tartar. 

To make yourself miserable, just think about your- 
self, what respect other people ought to show you, 
and what people think of you; about what you want 
and what you ought to have, and what you like to eat. 

When a child begins to limp, walk on its toes, and 
complain of pain in the knees, hip-disease must be 
suspected, especially if the limb is tender to handle. 

Water is a good disinfectant. Where there are 
sick people place a large vessel filled with water 
under the bed. It absorbs the foul odors of the 
room. Change it daily. Milk or water or any fluid 
foods should not be used after standing long in the 
sick room. 

A man too busy to take care of his health is like a 
person too busy to sharpen his tools. 

When young persons and children complain much 
of headache, especially when studying, the trouble 
can usually be corrected by glasses, if properly fitted. 

Sprains. — In case of a bad sprain apply cloths 
wrung out of hot water. This is worth more than 
liniments. 



THE ELKHART CHURCH. 



Many are the stories told of the wonderful beauty 
of the Elkhart and St. Joseph valleys, before they 
were marred by the axe of the hardy emigrant. The 
valleys were covered by a heavy growth of timber, 
dotted here and there by a fertile strip of prairie, 
/hich alternated with sand-hills and reedy swamps, 
poorly drained by sluggish streams. Here was to be 
found almost every species of tree, shrub or vine that 
grow in a temperate climate, and their extraordinary 
growth gave unmistakable evidence of the wonderful 
richness of the soil. Game existed here in great 
abundance, and many thrilling incidents are related 
by the successful hunter of the pioneer days. Indians 
were quite numerous, and they fared bountifully from 
the game that inhabited these wilds. But to the white 
man this region was long known as the far " North- 
west;" and it was not open to settlement by him till 
the close of the twenties. 



Among the first to venture into this wild, new coun- 
try, was Daniel Cripe, an elder in the Brethren 
church. He, with his family, and Jacob Cripe, Christ. 
Stouder, and John Pipenger and their families, came 
in 1829. Daniel Cripe was a man of medium height, 
broad-shouldered and well muscled; his face was 
smooth-shaven, and complexion light. Being of 
kindly disposition, he made many friends, and com- 
manded the love and respect of all who knew him. 

He selected for himself a half section of land on 
Elkhart prairie, about two miles south of where the 
City of Goshen now stands, and at once erected a log 
cabin upon it, and made other necessary preparations 
for a home. He, with his friends, constructed a rude 
plow with a wooden moldboard, for the purpose of 
turning a few furrows to mark their claims and put 
out small crops to raise provisions for the coming 
winter. 

After making the plow, the question arose as to 
who should use it first. It was decided that the old- 
est should first use it, and as Daniel Cripe was the 
oldest, the lot fell to him, and thus, according to tra- 
dition, he was the first white settler to plow a furrow 
on Elkhart prairie. 

Having established his new home, he returned in 
the early part of 1830 to Montgomery County, Ohio, 
his former home, and induced his son Samuel, and 
family, to emigrate to this country. Martin Weybright 
and family, Jacob Studebaker and family, and others, 
came also this year. In the early part of the summer 
of 1830 a daughter, Rosanna, was born to the wife of 
John Cripe, nephew of Daniel Cripe, she being the 
first child born to any of the Brethren in Northern In- 
diana. The Cripe family has since become very nu- 
merous, and has exerted no small influence in the his- 
tory of the church of this county; a large portion of 
it adhering closely to the teachings of the Brethren. 

One of the first things to be remembered by these 
early settlers was their devotion to God. According- 
- ly services were held in the homes of the Brethren, 
Eld. Cripe preaching in German. The work pros- 
pered, and soon, as near as can be ascertained, in the 
spring of 1830, was organized the Elkhart church. 
This was the nucleus around which were formed all 
of the churches of the Northern District of Indiana. 
From the first they called themselves the Brethren, 
and for a long time were known by no other name. 

In the latter part of the summer of 1830 the church 
decided to hold a love feast. No beef could be pro- 
cured; therefore Eld. Cripe gave a ewe lamb, — the 
only one he had, — for the supper. As n ^ar as can be 
ascertained, about twenty members cvmmuned. It 
was held in Eld. Cripe's house, and was pronounced, 
by some present, as the most enjoyable feast they had 
ever attended. 

Traveling in those days was very difficult, and 
many hardships had to be endured, even after reach- 



12tli Montli; 






DECEMBER. 




Days 31. 


Days & Weeks 


5^ 


Remarkable || 
Days. H 


MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 


Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 


ffspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 


Sun sxjnsr 
Slow Rises & Sets. 

m.|h. m. ih. m. 


1 Thurs. 

2 Friday 

3 Sat. 


19 
20 
21 


Longiuus 
Candidus 
Cassianus 


3 
4 
4 


2 7 

2 55 

3 40 


7 40 

8 48 

9 50 


>'^^lBd $ inferior ^ 
(^ 2 ([ in Apogee 
cgfiedc^C^ ^Gr.Elong,E. 


c-h. 

10 


7 19 4 41 
7 194 41 
7 20 4 40 



49] 2d Sunday in Advent 


. 




Luke 22. 


Day's length 9 hour 


3 20 ir 


lin. 


4 Sunday 


22 


L. J. Heatwole 
born 1852. 


5 


4 23 


10 48 


^ 


f? souths 12 4 


9 


7 20 


4 40 


5 Mond'y 


23 


Abigail 


6 


5 5 


11 35 


^14 


? inS 


9 


7 21 


4 39 


6 Tues. 


24 


SL Nicholas 


7 


5 47 


morn. 


^28 


|g^6. d 1? O S 


9 


7 21 


4 39 


7 Wed. 


25 


Agathon 


7 


6 29 


12 30 


"j^^ 1-" 


\j£^ Orion rises 6 25 


8 


7 22 


4 38 


8 Thurs. 


26 


Cone. V. M 


8 


7 13 


1 28 


1^26 


If souths 8 53 


8 


7 22 


4 38 


9 Friday 


27 


Joachim 


9 


8 1 


2 15 


«iio 


Aldebaranso. 11 21 


1 


7 23 


4 37 


10 Sat. 


28 


Judith 


10 


8 52 


3 32 


«ig25 


dlf([-d?3i{. testation. 


V 


7 23 


4 37 



50] 3d Sunday in Advent. 



Matt. 11. 



Day's length 9 hours 14 min. 



11 Sunday 


29 


12 Mond'y 


30 


13 Tues. 


D 


14 Wed. 


2 


15 Thurs. 


3 


16 Friday 


4 


17 Sat. 


5 



Barsabas 

Ottilia 

Lucian 

Nicasius 

Ignatius 

Ananias 

Lazarus 



10 


9 49 


4 54 


m 9 


11 


10 50 


6 20 


«f^23 


12 


11 55 


(J sets 


^ 1 


1 


12 59 


5 40 


^20 


2 


2 2 


6 30 


Ih 3 


3 


3 


8 34 


^16 


4 


3 54 


9 39'^28 



7* souths 10 16 

C^ dlilC. dT?([ 
13.0ecl.Inv.^ 
([ in Perig. ^ inffi 

5^ W o . 

Regulus rises 9 45 
Fomalhaut sets 9 20 



6 


7 23 


6 


7 24 


5 


7 24 


5 


7 24 


4 


7 25 


4 


7 25 


3 


7 25 



37 
36 
36 
36 
35 
35 



4 35 



51] 4th Sunday in Advent. 



John 1. 



Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 



18 Sunday 


6 


19 IVIond'y 


7 


20 Tues. 


8 


21 Wed. 


9 


22 Thurs. 


10 


23 Friday 


11 


24 Sat. 


12 



Arnoldus 

Abraham 

Ammon 

Einberday 

Beata 

Dagobert 

Adam, Eve 



5 


4 44 


10 40 


S<io 


6 


5 32 


11 14 


S^22 


7 


6 19 


morn. 


frf 4 


8 


7 5 


12 14 


ff*16 


9 


7 53 


1 18 


^28 


9 


8 41 


2 20 


^10 


10 


9 31 


3 46 


^22 



Sirius rises 7 50 S 
1|.19.? inPerihel. 

JiAltair sets 8 28 

Op ^jfc Shortest Winter 
c. i«^* Day. Begins. 

Arietas souths 8 6 
Rigel souths 10 48 
% souths 8 



3 


7 25 


2 


7 25 


2 


7 25 


1 


7 26 


1 


7 25 


^ 


7 25 


o 


7 25 



35 
35 
35 
34 
35 
35 
35 



52] Christmas Sunday. 



Luke 2. 



Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 



25 Sunday 

26 IViond'y 

27 Tues. 

28 Wed. 

29 Thurs. 

30 Friday 

31 Sat. 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 



Christmas 

Stephen 

John Evan. 

H. Innoc'nts 

Noah 

Copeimicus 

Sylvester 



11 


10 22 


4 58 


^ 5 


12 


11 13 


6 10 


^18 


1 


morn. 


([rises 


« 1 


2 


12 2 


5 40 


«14 


2 


12 51 


6 46 


«28 


3 


1 37 


7 48 


<i?tl2 


3 


2 21 


8 55 


«f26 



Vega sets 8 58 

d w c 

^rj|27. C eclip. Vis. 
^pOrionso. 11 16 
([ in Apogee 

d c^C 

in Perihelion 






7 25 


1 


7 25 


1 


7 25 


2 


7 25 


3 


7 25 


3 


7 24 


3 


7 24 



35 
35 
35 
35 
35 
36 
36 



IVIOOIM'S PMASeS. 



EASTERN STATES. 
Last Quarter, 6th, 5 o'clock 07 min. Morn 
New Moon, 13th, 6 " 45 
First Quarter, iyth,10 " 23 
Full Moon, 27th, 6 " 41 



CENTRAL STATES. 
4 o'clock 27 min. Morn. 
6 " 05 " Morn. 
9 " 43 " Even. 
6 " 01 *' Even. 

Venus is in inferior conjunction with the Sun on the 1st and changes from evening star to morning star, 
Saturn is in conjunction with the Sun on the 6th and cannot be seen. 



Morn. 
Even. 
Even. 



WESTERN STATES. 
3 o'clock 47 min. Morn 
5 " 25 " Morn 
9 " 3 " Even 
5 " 21 " Even 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



31 



ing the place of settlement. But these difficulties, 
instead of discouraging our pioneer brethren, only 
stimulated them to greater efforts. Emigrants from 
the East kept pouring in, and the brethren settling in 
different localities, soon covered a great amount of 
territory. This created much work for Eld. Cripe, 
and, feeling the need of help, a church meeting was 
called and two brethren, Martin Weybright and Jacob 
Studebaker, were chosen to the ministry. These were 
the first two brethren elected to the ministry in North- 
ern Indiana. We have no printed sermons from 
either of these two men, and neither of them ever 
held any protracted meetings. Nothing is said to- 
day of even a single sermon, but their lives stand out 
as bright and shining lights. Their most telling ser- 
mons were their daily actions. Both became elders. 
Both lived to a ripe old age. Both still live in the 
work they accomplished and in the m.emory of God's 
people. We have not the space here to describe fully 
the lives of these brethren and what they did, but, 
though plain and simple, their lives were very useful. 

Other ministers moved from the East and made 
this their home. *' Johnny "Leatherman came in 
1835, and settled in the southern part of Elkhart 
county. Soon, upon the advice of Eld. Cripe, the 
members, eight in number, of that portion of the ter- 
ritory, were organized into a separate congregation, 
and became known as the Turkey Creek church. 

Eld. James Tracey came in about 1850 or '51. He 
was not only a natural orator, but a born leader of 
men, and, by his strong traits of personal character, 
exerted a wonderful influence for the church. Through 
his efforts the Elkhart district was again divided, — 
this time into three separate congregations. The 
Rock Run church was cut off on the east and the 
Yellow Creek church on the west. Later the Elkkart 
Valley district was cut off on the northwest. The 
Brethren kept pushing out in all directions and a 
number of churches have been organized, — all ema- 
nating from one common center, the Elkhart churchy 

Studying the lives and the work of our pioneer 
Brethren is full of interest. As a historian says of 
the Puritans, so we say of our ancestors: "They were 
sturdy men and women, and the sturdiest part of 
them was their principles. When they began the 
structure of their new society, they began at the bot- 
tom. They built upon God and -in Godliness. Christ 
was their foundation, and his edifice was the structure 
which they sought to build." We find in them the 
sense of justice, courage, fidelity to obligations, faith- 
fulness in marriage, appreciation of the true and solid 
in preference to the beautiful and showy, and devoted- 
ness to home and domestic life. In the hard, vigor- 
ous nature of our ancestors, we find the granite ele- 
ments of a robust character, capable of the highest 
development. 



Eld. Cripe died in 1859, at the age of 87 years and 
6 months. His ashes now rest in the little cemetery 
near the eastern edge of Elkhart prairie. His grave is 
a modest one, and but few people in passing by realize 
that here lie the remains of the organizer of the first 
Brethren church in what was then known as the 
" Northwest," and the first Protestant minister in Elk- 
hart county. 

But the church still moved on with varying success, 
adding to her number some by baptism, and others, 
as emigrants from the Eastern States. The Elkhart 
church now has a membership of over four hundred, 
with five resident elders and four other ministers. 
May she continue to prosper, and ever be an honor to 
Him who died for all! Owen Opperman. 



INCIDENTS IN A PREACHER'S LIFE. 



To one who has spent forty years in the pulpit, 
mostly on the frontier, either in the backwoods or on 
the wide, extended plains of the West, there are many 
special incidents that come afresh to memory when 
one quietly sits down to let the mind have a review 
of the past. I will venture to portray a scene or two 
for the annals of history. 

INCIDENT I. 

SEEKING CHRIST UNDER DIFFICULTY. 

At one time a series of meetings was held in the 
mountains of West Virginia. Many people listened 
to the "old story," which, to them, was a new way of 
putting it. A number believed and were admitted to 
church fellowship. One poor girl, in her teens, who 
lived with her father and brother, was desirous of ac- 
cepting Christ in his own appointed way. Her father 
objected with such vehemence that he threatened to 
drive her from home, and also said if she joined in 
with those people he would kill himself. 

It was a beautiful Sabbath morning. She came to 
me with tears tracing their way over her sad-looking 
face. Almost heartbroken. Godly sorrow in her heart, 
the love of a blessed Savior hovering around, she was 
in a strait between parental love, and fear to act, as 
she believed was her duty. 

"What shall I do?" said she. 

I said, "Take it all to Jesus, and he will tell thee 
what to do." 

We were in the yard of the brother's house, where 
she was temporarily staying, and where the meetings 
were being held. She at once went up-stairs to a pri- 
vate room. I sought a secret chamber also. The 
battle began. A little lamb pleading for mercy and 
freedom from the net of the destroyer, — I, at the ar- 
senal of heaven, doing what I could. 

"Satan trembles" when he sees a penitent in 
prayer. He flees when faith is arrayed in the "whole 
armor of God." 



T?PTt 



32 



Brethretis Family Almanac. 



I went again into the yard. She soon came, and the 
first glance at her face showed me she had conquered. 
I stepped quickly forward, and, taking her hand, said, 
"Thank the Lord for His goodness: you will be bap- 
tized with the rest to-day." 

"Yes," said she. " My father cannot save me, but 
Jesus can ; come what may, I am resolved to do my 
duty." 

She was not strong, and her friends said she had 
consumption. Some said she could not stand it to be 
baptized. I told them to utter not another word of 
opposition, — that I was going to baptize her, God per- 
mitting. 

The most willing and easiest candidate to baptize 
that I ever received into the church was this little 
maid. She was extremely happy and buoyant. 
" Now," said I, before I left, " you have taken Christ 
as your Savior, for your soul, take him also for your 
bodily healer." She did so. Twenty-five years after 
she was still earnest and happy in her faith and Chris- 
tian work. Did the father kill himself, or drive her 
from home, because of her course? No, indeed! Sa- 
tan can make loud pretensions, but at best is a cow- 
ard, where he meets true faith. 

INCIDENT II. 

THE FOLLY OF ATTEMPTING TO RESIST THE SPIRIT. 

At another time a preaching tour of some weeks, — 
far out into the mountain country of West Virginia, — 
was undertaken. A Communion meeting was held at 
a brother's home. We held a meeting in the barn. 
Father, mother and one daughter were at the table. 
the oldest daughter was a member of a church as 
worldly as the world. She was a leader among the 
fashionable young people. I, at once, decided she 
ought to be in the church, as an influence for the rest 
of the children in the family and the young people of 
the community, as well as for her own interest. I 
made a specialty of her case in my interviews with the 
Lord. 

Next day the weather was cold, and the meeting 
was held in the house, which was crowded. The 
daughter took a seat near the center of the room, gay 
and unconcerned, seemingly. I will now let her speak 
a while: 

"After my mother joined the church she was a 
whole-souled member. She preached day and night 
to her children and now, though dead, her good and 
wise counsel is ever dear to me. Her good teaching 
soon made me see the folly of a form of godliness, 
that has no power in it, because of its worldly asso- 
ciations. I often felt dissatisfied and condemned, but 
let no one know of it. On Sunday, when Bro. Flory 
began his preaching, I was unconcerned about the 
matter. However, I soon became seriously wrought 
upon; but the enemy would say to my mind, ' Do not 
think of joining the church. If you do join you can- 



not follow the fashions. Your intended husband will 
cast you off. It seemed as though I could not endure 
the shafts of truth that went to the depths of my soul. 
I looked around to see a way of escape, but saw no 
pass-way out, only by my mother. I felt that if I at- 
tempted it I would fall at her side. I endured it for 
a while, but finally said, ' Come what will, I will do my 
duty, for what are the allurements of the world, the 
fascinations of the vain fashions, or even what is an 
affianced husband, when the soul is at stake?' I 
yielded to my better convictions, and oh, what a 
blessed change! Next day 1 tore up my fine hat and 
divested my dresses of their flounces and ruffles. The 
gaudy ornaments had to go. Now that the love of sin 
had gone, I hated them, so I put the temptations 
out of the way. That was over twenty-five years ago, 
and I feel the same strength of a Savior's love and 
have the earnest of the Spirit to help me on as then." 

I was not slow to discover her uncomfortable con- 
dition, and noticed she seemed to look for a way to 
leave the house. She was the first on her feet to 
make known she was a candidate for church fellow- 
ship. When I inquired if she wanted to be baptized 
without delay she said, " Yes, as soon as possible." 
Her mother asked me if she should change her gaudy 
apparel for something more plain. " No difference," 
said I, " only remove the things that will hinder the 
baptism; let the rest be a shroud in which to bury 
that old corrupt nature." 

She gave evidence at once of the wonderful power 
of the transforming nature of the Gospel when it gets 
in its work in the mind, and makes all things new. 
She was convinced that to fight against the power of 
the true Spirit was folly. J. S. Flory. , 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



OUR MISSION POINTS. 



The Brethren have many encouraging mission 
points in the United States, extending from the Paci- 
fic to the Atlantic, and from North Dakota to Florida. 
The number of these points is yearly increasing, 
and it is to be hoped that we will soon have flourish- 
ing missions in every State in the Union, It is unfor- 
tunate that we have no active workers iu Canada, for 
by right we ought to have congregations in nearly all 
parts of the Dominion. 

We have a number of missions in Sweden and Den- 
mark. In fact we have one congregation within the 
Arctic Circle — the land of the midnight sun. Here, 
during the middle of the summer, there is practically 
no night, but in the winter there are months when the 
sun is not seen above the horizon more than a few 
hours any day, and for some weeks it cannot be seen 
at all. 

Our mission at Smyrna is reported to be in an en- 
couraging condition. This is where the noted Bishop, 



Brethren s Family Almanac, 



33 



Polycarp, used to live, and where he preached and 
presided over one of the *' Seven Churches of Asia." 
Some converts have been made near where Ephe- 
sus once stood, and also some others in the City of 
Philadelphia. There are indications of the seven 
golden candlesticks being returned to their places 
and Jesus walking in the midst of them. 

The mission at Bulsar, India, has been full of inter- 
est during the last six months, for a number have 
been baptized, and the famine has drawn the people 
closer to our missionaries. The workers there will be 
reinforced ere long, and then we shall look for the 
work to be greatly enlarged, and for an increase in 
results. 

As soon as practical we should open up other mis- 
sions. We need some workers in China, and ought 
to have a mission in Australia, as well as others in 
England, Germany, and other parts of Europe. Our 
opportunities are enlarging, and we should prepare to 
enter every field where there is an open door. 



THE LORD'S MONEY. 



The writer of this knows a brother who has in his 
house a missionary box, into which he drops a certain 
amount of his wages each month. He has a little in- 
come from other sources aside from his wages, and 
some of this finds its way into the box. This he calls 
the Lord's money, and he takes pleasure in using it 
for the Lord's work. When a call is made for mis- 
sion money, he goes to his box for it. If the poor need 
food and clothing, he draws on the Lord's money. If 
he is called away to preach, and has to be at any ex- 
pense, he thinks that it is no more than proper that 
the money in the mission box be used to meet the ex- 
penses. His wife has access to the box also, and into 
it she drops some of her money. It is a pleasure to 
her to use the Lord's money for the Lord's work. We 
know others who have their missionary boxes, into 
which they place one-tenth of their net income, and 
from which they draw as they need fuilds for some 
good work. We would like to encourage all of our 
readers to become interested in systematic giving; 
and then we would be able to accomplish more for 
every good cause coming under our notice. 



ELD. GEORGE WOLFE. 



At the close of a day of labor and sorrow, occasioned 
by the death of a dear sister and mother in the Liber- 
ty, 111., church, as the sun is quietly sinking in the 
West, we find ourself standing in the old cemetery 
where Eld. George Wolfe and his wife, with many 
others, are sleeping, awaiting the last trump of God. 

At this place Bro. Wolfe spent thirty-five of the 
fifty-three years of his successful ministry. 



In 1829 he solemnized the first marriage and 
preached the first sermon ever delivered in Liberty 
township. In 1831 he organized the first church in 
the township, and during his labors here, although he 
had but a limited education, was able to meet the op- 
position of his day. 

At one time, when he was holding a debate with 
the Catholics, Governor Bond, hearing that there was 
danger of him being mobbed, sent a number of sol- 
diers to the place to protect him. The capital was 
then at Kaskaskia. 

It is said that some of our best statesmen went quite 
a distance to hear him preach. He had built up a 
large congregation before he closed his labors in his 
Master's vineyard. 

While standing at the grave of the dear old ''soldier 
ofthecross^' although having met him but once, we feel 
a strong desire to one day enjoy with him the beauti- 
ful home on high, and as we are musing and looking 
about over the quiet resting place of the dear ones 
around us, we read from the marble tablet at his 
head, 

GEORGE WOLFE 

WAS BORN 

April 25, 1780, 

DIED 

November 16, 1865. 

Geo. W. Cripe 



A WORD WITH THE DOCTOR. 



Don't think that any medicine will take the place 
of right living! 

Don't fret; whatever else you do, don't fret; don't 
scold; don't worry; keep calm and even tempered. 
This will preserve your face from wrinkles, your 
body from infirmities, your mind from unrest and 
friction, and prolong your life in peace. 

Don't use any device to preserve beauty, such as 
paints, powders, washes, dyes or bleaches; the only 
thing that will really preserve or procure beauty is 
good health. A clean and healthy body and a sound 
and active mind are the only beautifiers known. 

It is possible to prevent many diseases and cure 
others by drinking large quantities of water. An 
eminent French physician says that typhoid fever 
can be washed out of the system by water. He gives 
his patients what would amount to eight or ten 
ounces an hour of sterilized water. Experiments 
have been made with diseases caused by bacteria, 
which demonstrate the curative value of water. In 
cases of cholera, where the system secretes a large 
amount of fluid, enormous quantities of hot water are 
of great benefit, and will cure many cases without 
other medicines. One doctor says that perfectly 
sweet, fresh cider, taken in large quantities, has been 



34 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



known to cure cases of bowel complaint. The acid 
kills the bacteria, which are speedily thrown out of 
the system. Hot water, in fevers, is of great use, and 
an ordinary tumblerful of water as hot as can be 
taken once an hour is one of the very best remedies. 
The important thing is to get into the system and out 
of it a sufficient amount of water to prevent the ac- 
cumulation of ptomaines and toxins within the body. 



A LAWSUIT ILLUSTRATED. 




The Suit Began.— Two well-to-do farmers fell 
out about a cow, worth probably not more than forty 
dollars. While they quarreled, and spent their time 
and money in a lawsuit, the lawyer reaped the bene- 
fit, — he got the milk. 




The Suit Ended.— In course of time the litiga- 
tion came to an end. The lawyer got the cow, and 
the farmers went home much poorer, but wiser men. 

Moral. — Settle your own troubles and keep out of 
lawsuits. 



CHRISTOPHER SOWER. 



In all probability Christopher Sower, of German- 
town, Pa., was one of the most remarkable men with 
whom our Brotherhood has ever been blessed. On 
Feb. 24, 1737, he united with the church, being then 
in his sixteenth year. He enjoyed the very best of 
educational privileges for that age, possessed a mind 
pf far more than ordinary ability, and in his day 



wielded an influence with pen and tongue second to 
few in America. 

He carried on a printing business larger than that 
in which we*, are now engaged, published and edited 
a newspaper that reached a weekly circulation of 
about ten thousand, established large paper mills, and, 
with his father, established the first type foundry on 
the Continent, published nearly two hundred different 
books, translated a number of them into the English 
language, printed the first Bible published in the 
United States, printed Sunday school cards and en- 
couraged Sunday schools long before they were 
dreamed of by the popular denominations, wrote and 
spoke against the evils of slavery years before the 
anti-slavery movement had an existence, was the in- 
ventor of the heating stoves in the modern world, 
took a leading part in founding the Germantcwn 
Academy, nearly one hundred years before our 
Brethren thought of establishing high schools, made 
a public speech in favor of the Academy, and was 
one of the largest contributors to the fund for erect- 
ing the building. 

All this and much more he did in addition to trav- 
eling and preaching extensively, for he was an elder 
in the church, universally respected for his learning, 
piety, loyalty and rare ability. As a speaker, he was 
eloquent, profound and impressive, and wielded a 
pen whose power was felt throughout the land. 
Where is the man who has left such a record! 
When we read what this man performed in the short 
time of sixty-three years, it seems almost incredible. 

With all of our colleges, Sunday schools, publish- 
ing interest. Missionary and Tract movements, we 
are indeed but little in advance of what old Bro. 
Christopher Sower both advocated and in part exe- 
cuted over one hundred years ago. During the Rev- 
olutionary War he was stripped of all his property 
and died a poor man shortly after the close of the 
war. His remains now rest in the Methatchen bury- 
ing ground, near Fairview and Norristown, Pa. 

J. H. M. 

Science advises the use of fruit as an aid to diges- 
tion of other foods; such, for example, as apple-sauce, 
little sweetened, or, still better, sour apples baked; or 
for more developed digestive action, the raw apple 
or other fruit. The mandate of science is that fruits 
should be used as an aid to digestion much more than 
they are now. The fruits supply acids which partic- 
ularly assist the acids of the stomach. On the same 
ground, lemon-juice in tea instead of sugar is helpful 
to digestion. Physicians now largely prescribe lemon- 
juice to help weak digestion. A great many persons 
who get up with bad feelings in the morning would 
find themselves cured if they regularly ate an apple 
with a slice of bread or other plain food a little while 
before bed-time.— 5<?^ Culture, 



3l 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



35 



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36 



Brethreii s Family Alma?uic. 



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QAI III A T*)^ 01'' "''■^'■'B Colorado... 
OrlLVIM ...Rocky Mountain Herb ! 

(Trade Mark) 

A WORLD WONDER 

FOR SALE ONLY BY THE 

Colorado Salvia Company^ .... Rockford, III. 

(Successors to the Pacific Medicine Co.) 

The enormous sale of this wonderful herb during the last 
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LOCK & KEY 



or Woman's Friend, has been out of 
print for fifteen years. The seventh 
edition will soon be issued. Price, 25 
Address, 



cents. Send for circulars 

J. S. fLoRY, station A, Los Angeles, Cal 



KEEP YOUR EYE 



on the advertisements of 
the Dos Palos Colony in 
the Gospel Messenger. They are changed frequently 
and contain valuable information. 

B. MARKS, 

Dos Palos, Cal. 



PROFITS IN POULTRY RAISING. 



The raising of chickens is an industry that interests 
all classes of people, from the day laborer to the mer- 
chant, or banker, or millionaire. We find all kinds of 
people engaged in this pursuit; some for pleasure 
and pastime, others for the profits derived from the 
business. Possibly more are engaged for the benefits 
derived, than those who only raise them for pleasure 
and pastime. 

It is our duty to try and make for ourselves enough 
money to be independent of each other, so far as our 
daily support is concerned. We know of no way in 
which one can make as much money with small cap- 
ital as in raising chickens. The chicken business has 
assumed gigantic proportions here in this country, 
leading wheat by over $5,000 annually, and yet we 
cannot supply our markets with our own product. 
America imports annually from foreign countries 
millions of dollars worth of eggs and fowls. There is 
nothing we can raise that will bring us larger profits 
and quicker returns than poultry, and the better qual- 
ity we raise, so much larger profits may be expected. 
True, there is money in raising the commonest sorts; 
but there is much more profit in raising the very best 
thoroughbred fowls, as you can always sell their eggs 
at an advanced price, and all surplus birds you may 
have to spare, you can sell at much higher prices for 
breeding purposes, than you could secure on the 
market. 

The subject of poultry raising should not be over- 
looked, as it is of vital importance to everybody that 
has a farm, or only a back yard to raise them, simply 
because there is much pleasure and vast profit, if 
properly handled. If you wish to learn more about 
the business, write to C. C. Shoemaker for his large, 
96-page "Almanac and Poultry Annual for 1898." It 
contains a first-class family almanac for 1898, many 
fine illustrations, direct from photographs, of his large 
and well-kept poultry farm. It tells all about the 
care and management of chickens; how to raise them 
successfully. It tells all about the diseases of fowls, 
and remedies for their cure. It contains many illus- 
trations and ground plans with full descriptions of 
how to build the most convenient and economical 
poultry houses. This wonderful work contains re- 
cipes for the cure of Cholera, Roup and other dis- 
eases common to poultry. It gives full directions for 
feeding and managing young chicks, and a fund of 
other information along the line of poultry culture. 
It also gives illustrations of forty-four of the leading 
varieties of pure bred chicks, with description of 
same; also prices of fowls and eggs. It also gives 
full information of his large importations of fine fowls, 
selected by himself, while over in England and the 
Continent, which is the largest that has ever been 
brought to America by a single breeder. 

The work is printed on fine paper, and the cover is 
printed in four colors, which presents a very fine ap- 
pearance. Do not fail to send for a copy of this 
book, as it is worth dollars to any and all who are in- 
terested in the raising of fine fowls, and is sold for 
the small sum of only 15 cents. 

Address: C. C. Shoemaker, Freeport, 111., U. S. A. 



Brethren's Family Almanac, 



37 



D^IZtTISTEK/I^llj LIST. 



Corrected up to and Including Sept. 27, 1897. 



SWEDEN. 

Anderson, Andreas, Limhamn 

Anderson, W Malm berg 

Gustafson, Alfred Wanneberga 

Jenson, Per, Wanneberga 

Ohlsson, Hans, Malmo 

Olin, O. P., • Skurup 

Risberg, Jans, Kjeflinge 

DENMARK. 

Eskildsen, C. C Hjorring 

Gespersen, Peter S., Horduni 

Hansen, Christian, Godthaab 

Johansen, Martin Hordum 

Poulson, P. C, Frederickshavn 

Swendsen, Theodor 

Brodrehjemmet, Sindal 

INDIA. 
Forney, Daniel L., 

. . . Bulsar, Presidency of Bombay 
McCann, S. N., 

. . . Bulsar, Presidency of Bombay 
Stover, W.B 

. . . Bulsar, Presidency of Bombay 

ASIA MINOR. 

Apikian, Stephen, Smyrna 

Fercken, G. J., Smyrna 

UNITED STATES. 
Abernathy, I. W., . Wilsons Mills, W. Va 
Abernathy, J. W., . Wilsons Mills, W. Va 
Adkins, J. M., .... Cabool, Texas, Mo 
Ahner, J. ,251 Walton Ave., Ft. Wayne, Ind 
Akers, Dr. R. T., Alum Ridge, Floyd, Va 
Akers, Washington, .... Carthage, Va 
Albaugh, J. E., . Olney, Shiawassee, Mich 
Albright, Wm., . . Steamboat Rock, Iowa 

Aldinger, Jacob, York, Pa 

Alldredge, J. S., Anderson, Ind 

Allen, H. C, . Snowflake, Hawkins, Tenn 
Allen, J. Rothrock, .... Dumont, Iowa 
Allen, Harvey W., . . . Dumont, Iowa 
Allison, David, . . , Lees Crossroads, Pa 

Amick, Joseph, Mt. Morris, 111 

Anderson, George, . . . Snowflake, Tenn 
Andes, Levi, . . . Newton, Harvey, Kans 
Andrews, M.E., . . . . Oysterville, Wash 
Anglemyer, John, Nappanee, Elkhart, Ind 

Angle, Lee, Bonbrook, Va 

Annon, Zechariah, . . . Thornton, W. Va 
Annon, G. W., . Thornton, Taylor, W. Va 
Anthony, Wm., . . Clayhill, Franklin, Pa 

Anthony, F. D., Elderton, Pa 

Appleman, John, Plymouth, Ind 

Appleman, Jacob, .... Clarkson, Okla 

Argabright, I, H New Hope, W. Va 

Arnold, John A Eglon, W. Va 

Arnold, Perry A., . . . . Metamora, Ohio 
Arnold, Whitmore, Somerset, Perry, Ohio 
Arnold, D B., Burlington, Mineral, W. Va 
Arn-old, G. S., Burlington, Mineral, W. Va 
Arnold, Peter, Burlington, Mineral, W. Va 

Arnold, C. E., McPherson, Kans 

Arnold, John Lintner, Piatt, 111 

Arnold, Albert S., Eglon, W. Va 



Arnold, Arthur W., . Purgitsville, W. Va 
Arnold, D. E., . . . . Purgitsville, W. Va 
Armentrout, G. W., Dighton, Lane, Kans 
Atkinson, Robert, .... Kingsley, Iowa 
Auker, Joseph, .... McAlisterville, Pa 

Aultland, Daniel York, Pa 

Austin, A. W., Cushing, Okla 

Ausherman, David, . . . Burkittsville, Md 
Babylon, Emmanuel, . . Westminster, Md 
Badger, Robert, . . Panther, Dallas, Iowa 
Badger, Samuel, . . Panther, Dallas, Iowa 

Baer, M. T Fristoe, Benton, Mo 

Bagwell, E. B Alpha, Greene, Ohio 

Bahr, Jacob Damascus, Oregon 

Bailey, John P., . Mt. Etna, Adams, Iowa 
Baker, David, . . . Shepherdsville, Mich 
Baker, D., . Stephens City, Frederick, Va 

Baker, D. M., Waynesboro, Pa 

Baker, Levi, . . Olney, Shiawassee, Mich 

Baker, H. C East Pepin, Wis 

Baker, Samuel H., . . . Ludington, Wis 
Baker, J H., . . . . Astoria, Fulton, 111 

Baker, J. S., Everett, Bedford, Pa 

Baker, Adam, . Shadygrove, Franklin, Pa 

Baker, Raphael, Bayard, W. Va 

Baker, H. M., . West Newton, Allen, Ohio 
Baker, David H., Abbottstown, Adams, Pa 

Baker, N, R Citronelle, Ala 

Baker, John K Antioch, W. Va 

Baker, N. E., Dogwood, Ind 

Baker, Henry, Baker, Ohio 

Baker, David, . . South Wautauga, Tenn 
Bakener, Fred, . . . Leaf River, Ogle, 111 
Bame, Chas. A., . . Williamstown, Ohio 

Bautz, CM Lankford, Tenn 

Bare, John, Decatur, Burt, Nebr 

Barkdoll, Harvey M., . . Warrenville, 111 
Barklow, Samuel S., . . Norway, Oregon 
Barklow, Thomas, . . Myrtlepoint, Oregon 
Barklow, Chas. H., . Myrtlepoint, Oregon 
Barnes, Flemmon, . Brandonville, W. Va 
Barnes, John, . . . Soho, Berkeley, W. Va 

Barnhart, A Wirtz, Franklin, Va 

Barnhart, John, . . . Mansfield, Piatt, 111 

Barnhart, C Mansfield, Piatt, 111 

Barnhart, J. W., . . . Wirtz, Franklin, Va 
Barnhart, Jeremiah, . Junta, Franklin, Va 

Barnhart, O., Hylton, Va 

Barnhart, W. W., Dayton, Ohio 

Barnhart, Jacob, . Twelvemile, Cass, Ind 
Barnhart, D. B., . . . . Appanoose, Kans 
Barnhart, George, . Carthage, Jasper, Mo 

Barnhart, A. B Hagerstown, Md 

Barnhart, Josephus E., . Springfield, Mo 

Barnhizer, Isaac, Mt. Morris, 111 

Barnthouse, Jasper, . . Markleysburg, Pa 
Barrick, Isaac, .... Portland, Jay, Ind 
Barton, James, . . Corunna, Dekalb, Ind 

Barto, Isaac Mechanicsburg, Pa 

Barwick, H. M., . West Alexandria, Ohio 
Basehore, Geo. H., .... Miami, Texas 
Bashor, Andrew, . . . Oakland Mills, Pa 
Bashor, John, .... Bashors Mill, Tenn 
Bashor, Conrad, . . . Bashors Mill, Tenn 
Bashor, Joseph, . . Platteville, Weld, Colo 



Bashor, Daniel, . Holmesville, Gage, Neb'' 
Bashor, John R., . Evendale, Juniata, Pa 

Bashor, M. M Macleay, Oregon 

Basket, B. S., . . Sabetha, Nemaha, Kans 
Baugher, Aaron, . . . Codorus, York, Pa 
Baumbaugh, J. S., . . . Moonlight, Kans 
Beahm, Henry, . . . Lowry, Bedford, Va 

Beahm, I. N. H Brentsville, Va 

Beahm, W. E., . . Bellevue, Bedford, Va 

Beahm, S.P Bedford City, Va 

Beahm, J. C, Brentsville, Va 

Beagle, Eli, Ada, Hardin, Ohio 

Beagle, Howard J., Petroleum, Wells, Ind 
Beale, Jesse, . Waterloo, Blackhawk, Iowa 

Beam, Joseph, Ligonier, Pa 

Beam, Wm Degraff, Logan, Ohio 

Beaver, S. S., . McAlisterville, Juniata, Pa 
Beaver, John L., . Miffiinburg, Union, Pa 
Beaver, Adam, . . . Hartleton, Union, Pa 
Beaver, O. J., . . . Fredericksburg, Iowa 

Beaver, Isaiah Lochiel Union, Pa 

Beck, Jonas, Astoria, Fulton, 111 

Becker, G. S., . . . Deodate, Dauphin, Pa 
Beckner, Perry, .... Filley, Gage, Nebr 
Beckner, E. L., . . . Argos, Marshall, Ind 

Beeghly, John W Dayton, Ohio 

Beeghly, Josiah, Sabetha, Kans 

Beeghly, James W., . . . Accident, Md 
Beeghly, Jeremiah, Accident, Garrett, Md 

Beeghly, S. A., Coalport, Pa 

Beekly, Ezra Pierson, Iowa 

Beelman, Adam, . . Chicago, Huron, Ohio 
Beelman, Henry, . . Dillsburg, York, Pa 

Beer, J. H Rockton, Pa 

Beery, Jacob D Augusta, W. Va 

Beery, Chas. O., Bayce, La 

Beery, P. H., Fruitdale, Ala 

Beery, Salem McCune, Kans 

Bennett, John, . . . Artemas, Bedford, Pa 
Berkeybile, Aaron, Dubois, Pawnee, Nebr 

Berkeybile, D., Delta, Ohio 

Berkey, Isaac, . . . Goshen, Elkhart, Ind 

Berkey, Joseph, Hillsboro, Pa 

Berkley, Josiah, . . . Glade, Somerset, Pa 

Berkley, Albert, Johnstown, Pa 

Berkman, Hiram, . Fredric, Monroe, Iowa 
Betts, David, .... Independence, Kans 

Betts, I. F., Ingram, Okla 

Beverage, Levi, .... Cloverlick, W. Va 
Beverage, Josiah, Monterey, Highland, Va 

Billheimer, Isaac Edna Mills, Ind 

Bingaman, A. L., . Cerrogordo, Piatt, 111 

Bingaman, Wm., Laplace, 111 

Bixler, Uriah, Westminster, Md 

Biser, Solomon, .... Burlington, W. Va 

Blackquell, John East Prairie, Mo 

Blessing, S. A., . . Kewanna, Fulton, Ind 
Blickenstaff, Solomon, . . . Rossville, Ind 

Blickenstaff, D. J., Oakley, 111 

Blocher, S. W., . Greenville, Darke, Ohio 
Blough, J. W., Hooversville, Somerset, Pa 

Blough, P. J., Hooversville, Pa 

Blough, J. M., Stantons Mill, Pa 

Blough, E. J Stantons Mill, Pa 

Blough, Valentine, . , Bills, Somerset, Pa 



38 



Brethren's Family Almaruu. 



c 

Brunner, Edward S., Pearl, Frederick, Md 
Brunk, Henry, . Greentown, Howard. Ind 

Brunton. Walter, York, N. Dak 

Bucher, Geo., .... Mechanic Grove, Pa 
Bucher, Christian, . . Schaefferstown, Pa 
Bucher, Cyrus, .... Astoria, Fulton, 111 

Buck, C. L., New Enterprise, Pa 

Buck, Abraham Ireton, Iowa 

Burger, Robert E., . . . . Cerrogordo, 111 
Bucklew, Solomon, . . Canton, Fulton, 111 

Buckley, J. S Girard, 111 

Buckmaster, G. W., Carlisle, Lonoke, Ark 

Bueghly, Martin, Cando, N. Dak 

Burall, Jesse M New Market, Md 

Burger, S. J., . . Baltic, Tuscarawas, Ohio 
Burget, A. B., . . . Clovercreek, Blair, Pa 

Burcham, Wm., Noblesville, Ind 

Burket, Samuel E., . . . Sevastopol, Ind 

Burghart, Peter Centreview, Mo 

Burkhart, Jos.S., Johnstown, Cambria, Pa 
Burnett. P. R., Caldwell, St. Francis, Ark 
Burk, Charles, . . . New Interest, W. Va 

Bussard, Wm., Milford, Ind 

Butterbaugh, J. W., . . . . Maryland, 111 
Buterbaugh, J. O., . Martinsburg, W. Va 

Buzzard, John M., Ellerton, Md 

Byerly, David, .... Lima, Allen, Ohio 
Byerly, Daniel M., .... Curryville, Ind 
Byers, David, .... Canton, Stark, Ohio 
Cakerice, John, . . . Conrad Grove, Iowa 
Caldwell, L. D., . Mathias, Hardy, W. Va 
Calvert, W. Q., . . Mayhill, Adams, Ohio 
Calvert, Wm., . . . Bell, Highland, Ohio 

Calvert, Noah H., Jerico, Mo 

Calvert, Joseph G., . Sterling, Rice, Kans 
Campbell, James A., . . . . Mt. View, Mo 
Campbell, D. C, . . . Colfax, Clinton, Ind 

Campbell, John F Idlewood.Ill 

Carroll, Geo., Bigtunnel, Va 

Carl. Geo. C, . . . . Myrtlepoint, Oregon 
Carper, George, ..... Middlebury, Ohio 

Carter, J., Chandler, Okla 

Cassel, F. P., Lansdale, Montgomery, Pa 

Cassel, Isaac Fairview Village, Pa 

Castle, N. O., Brownsville, Md 

Castle, C. W., Brownsville, Md 

Caylor, Abraham, .... Greentown, Ind 

Caylor, John H Noblesville, Ind 

Caylor, D. S., . . Nottingham, Wells, Ind 
Chambers, J, W., . . Brice, Gratiot, Mich 

Chambers, Andrew, Midland, Va 

Chambers, D., . . . Brice, Gratiot, Mich 

Charles, Warren Grampian, Pa 

Chemberlen, Geo. F., . . . . Puente, Cal 
Christian, John H., . . . Gettysburg, Ohio 
Christian, John H., .... Roanoke, Ind 
Christian, Amos D., . . Mt. Pleasant, Pa 
Christner, N. B., . . . Miltord Station, Pa 
Christner, Amos, . Gebhart, Somerset, Pa 
Claar. Michael, . . . Claysburg, Blair, Pa 

Claar, J.C Queen, Bedford. Pa 

Claar, Abram J Queen, Bedford, Pa 

Clanahan, John, . St. Davids Church, Va 
Clapper, John. . Greatbend, Barton, Kans 

Clapper, D. S Everett, Pa 

Clapper, Sherman Seafield, Ind 

Clapper, Daniel, . Louisville, Stark, Ohio 
Clark, Dennis, . Maysville, Grant, W. Va 

Clark, Jesse, Telford, Tenn 

Clark, Wm Johnson City, Tenn 

Clark. Wm. H., . . Sheridan, Worth, Mo 



Blough, S, S Johnstown, Pa 

Blough, J. E., Manassas, Va 

Blough. A. P., Waterloo, Iowa 

Bock, Daniel, . . . Kokomo, Howard, Ind 

Boggs, William, Covington, Ohio 

Bohn, J.S., Peru, Ind 

Bollinger, B. B Shipshewana, Ind 

Bollinger, Daniel, . . . Shipshewana, Ind 

Bomberger, Cyrus, Lebanon, Pa 

Bond, Thomas. . . . Frenchcreek, W. Va 

Bond, Wm., White, Fayette, Pa 

Bonewitz, John, . . • Myrtlepoint, Oregon 
Bonsack, Charles. . • • Westminster, Md 
Borough, William, . . North Liberty, Ind 

Book, Isaac, Warble, Juniata, Pa 

Book, Edmund Blain, Perry, Pa 

Bookwalter, L, A., . . . . Trotwood, Oliio 
Boon, John O., . Waidsboro, Franklin, Va 
Boon, Samuel, . Corleyville, Roanoke, Va 
Booz, Jacob, Salfordville, Montgomery, Pa 
Boothe, Noah, . . . Alumridge, Floyd, Va 

Boothe, Peter, Bigtunnel, Va 

Bosely, David, BuUtown, W. Va 

Bosserman. Eleazar, Mt. Blanchard. Ohio 
Bosserman, Levi D., . . . . Robins, Iowa 

Bosserman. Wm. P Karoma, Okla 

Bosserman, J. H., . . . . Knoxville. Ark 
Bottorff, Jerry, . . Odell, Washington, Pa 

Bowers, Peter, Parkersburg, 111 

Bowers, David, . Sabetha, Nemaha, Kans 
Bowers, Philander, . . . Franklin, W. Va 

Bowers, A. J., Kirkpatrick, Ind 

Bowman, J. W Millville, Henry, Ind 

Bowman, Daniel, Burroak, Kans 

Bowman, Eli, Cameron, Wis 

Bowman, S.I Harrisonburg, Va 

Bowman, Jacob, .... Hagerstown, Ind 
Bowman, D. E., .... Hagerstown, Ind 
Bowman, D., . . . Glensted. Morgan, Mo 
Bowman, Peter, . Little River, Floyd, Va 

Bowman, Geo. C Blizzard, Tenn 

Bowman, Joseph Jonesboro, Tenn 

Bowman, Daniel Dillons Mills, Va 

Bowman, Geo., . . Junta, Franklin, Va 
Bowman, Isaac, . . Taccio, Franklin, Va 
Bowman, Abraham, . . Hagerstown, Ind 
Bowman, Daniel F., . Johnson City, Tenn 

Bowman, Samuel Flourville, Tenn 

Bowman, John P., . . . Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Bowser, W. H., . . New Brunswick, Ind 
Bowser, G. W., . Arcadia, Hamilton, In^l 

Bowser, Samuel Conrad, Iowa 

Bowser, J. J., . Cleveland, Kingman, Kans 

Bowser, John, Tatesville, Pa 

Boyd, C. L., . . Chilhowee, Johnson, Mo 
Boyd, A. L., . Brazilton, Crawford, Kans 
Boyer, Allen, .... Lena, Stephenson, 111 
Bradshaw, John, Brummetts Creek, N. C 
liradley, E. J., . . . . Saluda, Polk, N. C 

Bradley, F. H Knoxville. Ark 

Brallier, Simon, . . . Spencer, Clay, Iowa 
Brallier, H. H., Pierceton, Kosciusko, Ind 
Brallier, D. S., . . 213 7th St., Altoona, Pa 

Brammell, H. L Ozawkie, Kans 

Branson, Isaac E., . . . . Cammack, Ind 

Branscom, Geo, A., Clover, N. C 

Braucher, Urias D., .... Somerset, Pa 

Bray, W. T., Ladue, Henry, Mo 

Breshears, Burr E., . Avery, Benton, Mo 
Bricker, G. W., . . . Darkesville, W. Va 
Bricker, J^cob Downsville, Md 



Brickey, Allen, . . Jenson, Sebastian, Ark 
Bridge, Albert, . . Monticello, White, Ind 
Bright, J. Calvin, . . New Lebanon, Ohio 

Brilhart, D Loganville, York, Pa 

Brindle, Cyrus Carlisle, Pa 

Brindle, John, .... Martinsburg, W. Va 

Britt, B. F Barry. Ill 

Britton, Joseph F., . . . . Nokesville, Va 

Broadwater, J Greenleafton, Minn 

Brooks, J. W., Warrensburg, Mo 

Brough, John, . . East Berlin, Adams, Pa 

Brough, Jacob A., Galva, Kans 

Brouse, W. P., Ingram, Okla 

Brower, Jacob, . . . South English, Iowa 
Brower, C. M., . . . South English, Iowa 
Brower, David, . Talent, Jackson, Oregon 
Brower, Alfred, . . . Dale, Guthrie, Iowa 
Brower, John, . . Dorrance, Russell, Kans 
Brower, Joseph, . . . Denver, Miami, Ind 
Brower. S. F., . . . . South English, Iowa 
Brower, Peter, . . . South English, Iowa 

Brower, D. M., Ashland, Oregon 

Brower, Jacob J., . . Marshalltown. Iowa 

Brown, Wm. F Bashors Mill. Tenn 

Brown, Jeremiah, . . . New Windsor, Md 
Brown, John, . . . Bryan, Williams, Ohio 

Brown, S. M., Gardenplain, Kans 

Brown, Peter, . . East Berlin, Adams, Pa 

Brown, Charles C Abilene, Kans 

Brown, Jacob K.. Woodbury, Bedford, Pa 
Brown, C. H., . Navarre, Dickinson, Kans 
Brouhard, Harvey, . Mina, Marshall, Kans 
Brubaker, Henry T., . Chase, Rice, Kans 

Brubaker, A Gratis, Preble, Ohio 

Brubaker, John, . Morelock, Greene, Tenn 

Brubaker, Jonathan, Virden, 111 

Brubaker, J. O., . . . Acton, Logan, Okla 
Brubaker, D. E., . Panther, Dallas, Iowa 
Brubaker, David, . . . Loudonville, Ohio 
Brubaker, Henry, .... Knoxville, Ark 
Brubaker, J. S., . . . Merced, Merced, Cal 

Brubaker, Louis E Hickman, Va 

Brubaker, S. F., Farmersville, 111 

Brubaker, Joseph, Littlerock, Mo 

Brubaker, D. R.. . . Salem, Roanoke, Va 
Brubaker, Moses E., . Lyons, Rice, Kans 
Brubaker, Isaac S., . Mitchell, Rice, Kans 
Brubaker, Noah F., . Sawyer, Pratt, Kans 

Brubaker, C. C Wadsworth, 111 

Brubaker, D. M Williamsport, Ind 

Brubaker, J. F., . West Alexandria, Ohio 

Brubaker, J. H Virden, 111 

Brubaker, Christian, .... Neffsville, Pa 
Brubaker, Ellis S., . . . Peru, Miami, Ind 
Brubaker, Jonathan, Mitchell, Rice, Kans 

Brubaker, I. W., Laplace, 111 

Brubaker, W. U., Rockton, Pa 

Brumbaugh, M. G., . . . Huntingdon, Pa 
Brumbaugh, J. B., . . . . Huntingdon, Pa 

Brumbaugh, Jesse K Union, Ohio 

Brumbaugh, Geo., Grafton, Pa 

Brumbaugh, John Grafton, Pa 

Brumbaugh, H. B., . . . Huntingdon, Pa 
Brumbaugh, John H., . . . Clayton, Ohio 
Brumbaugh, James D., . Martinsburg, Pa 
Brumbaugh, G. B., . . . James Creek, Pa 

Brumbaugh, L. R., Denton, Md 

Brumbaugh, J. B., . . . . Clovercreek, Pa 

Brumbaugh, G. W Clovercreek, Pa 

Brumbaugh, A., Bradford, Ohio 

Brumbaugh, Jacob, . . . . Pitsburg. Ohio 



1> 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



39 



Claypool, H. S., . Saltlick Bridge, W. Va 
Cleaver. Geo., Curwensville, Clearfield, Pa 
Clemens, G. W., . . . . Stet, Carroll, Mo 

Click, J. W., Bridgewater, Va 

Click, Samuel, ....... Batavia, Ark 

Click, D. M., .... Grand Junction, Colo 

Cline, Joseph M., . . . Fort Defiance, Va 
Cline, John, . . Longglade, Augusta, Va 
Cline, Samuel, .... Stephens City, Va 

Cline, J. F Oakvale,.Kans 

A Cline, Geo., .... Kempton, Tipton, Ind 

Cloyd, , Cherokee, Okla 

Coate, David, . . . Celina, Mercer, Ohio 
Cober, Ephraim, Sabetha, Nemaha, Kans 

Cobb, E. M North Manchester, Ind 

Cochran, Martin Tollgate, W, Va 

Coffman, H. C. N., . . South English, Iowa 

Coffman, J. M., Roanoke, La 

Colebank, Wm. J Russell, Nebr 

Colebank, Marshall, .... Farnam, Nebr 

Colbert, George, Mont Ida, Kans 

Collins, Benj Greenbank, W. Va 

Conley, Lafayette, . . . Jonesboro, Tenn 
Connell, B. F., Brooklyn, Poweshiek, Iowa 

Connor, Abram, Manassas, Va 

Connor, Jacob Graters Ford, Pa 

Cook, A. L Petersburg, W. Va 

Cook, W. G., . Bijou Hills, Brule, S. Dak 
Cook, Hezekiah, . . Dillsburg, York, Pa 
Coover, David, . . Cicero, Defiance, Ohio 
Coppock, Samuel, Tippecanoe City, Ohio 
Coppock, Jacob, . Tippecanoe City, Ohio 
Cordier, F. P., . . . Celina, Mercer, Ohio 
Cordier, Joseph, . . Calhoun, Richland, 111 
Correll, P. M., . Morelock, Greene, Tenn 
Correll, C. A., ii Charleston St., York, Pa 
Cosner, J.T., . . Bismark, Grant, W. Va 

Cosner, Wm. H Bismark, W. Va 

Cotterman, Francis, .... Dayton, Ohio 
Couser, D. G., . Rokeby, Lancaster, Nebr 

Cover, Samuel C 

.... 7302 Tioga St., Pittsburg, Pa 
Cox, Samuel M., .... Kipple, Blair, Pa 

Coy, Aaron, Dayton, Ohio 

Cripe, D. E., . . . . Burdick, Taylor, Ky 

Cripe, John Hookdale, 111 

Cripe, David B., Dunlap, Kans 

Cripe, Jacob Dego, Ind 

Cripe, George W., .... Cerrogordo, 111 
Cripe, D. C, . . . North Manchester, Ind 

Cripe, Israel Warrensburg, Mo 

Cripe, John W., . . Goshen, Elkhart, Ind 
Cripe, Nathaniel, . Boylston, Clinton, Ind 
Crissman, G. W., . Walker, Russell, Kans 
Crissman, John, . . Hortons, Indiana, Pa 
Crist, Isaac H., . Gardner, Johnson, Kans 
Crist, Samuel, . Menomonee, Dunn, Wis 
Crist, Henry F., Gardner, Johnson, Kans 
Crist, J. E., . . . Chismville, Logan, Ark 

Crist, D. A Quinter, Gove, Kans 

Cross, J. J. (deaf mute), . Waterford, Ind 

Crosswhite, A. G., Flora, Ind 

Crouse, J. M., . . Oakhill, Fayette, W. Va 

Crouse. J.H Wacker, 111 

Crouthamel, Hillery, . Line Le.xington, Pa 
Crowell, Devolt, . Bradford, Miami, Ohio 

Cruea, Moses, Redkey, Ind 

•Crumrine, N. W., . Wabash, Wabash, Ind 
Crumpacker, A. H., .... Rinehart, Mo 
Crumpacker, Samuel, . . . Bonsacks, Va 
Culler, D.D Mt. Morris, 111 



Gulp, A. S., . : . . . Campbellsville, Ky 

Culp, Y., Leeton, Johnson, Mo 

Cummings, James T., Naffs, Va 

Czigans, Milton, Auburn, Ritchie, W. Va 
Daggett, Albion C, . . . Burroak, Kans 

Dale, N. S Cornell, III 

Danford, E. M., Sidney, Ohio 

Darr, JohnJ., . . . Gideon, Somerset, Pa 

Davis, Chas Lawrenceburg, Tenn 

Davis, D.C., . . . Trade, Johnson, Tenn 

Davis, C, Dunkirk, Jay, Ind 

Davis,. Wm., . . . . Morrill, Brown, Kans 

Davis, J.N. , Tub, Somerset, Pa 

Dawson, M. M., . . Jenson, Sebastian, Ark 

Deary, James E., Carey, Ohio 

Deanor, H. C Brownsville, Md 

Deardorff, Henry, . Argos, Marshall, Ind 
Deardorff, Isaac, . . Roann, Wabash, Ind 
Deardorff, John D. W., . . Gettysburg, Pa 

Deaton, J.F., Cavespring, Va 

Deal, John, Prymont, Ind 

Debolt, Alpheus, Masontown, Fayette, Pa 
Decker, Samuel E., . Myrtlepoint, Oregon 

Deeter, W. R., Milford, Ind 

Deeter, Manly, Milford, Ind 

Deleplain, John, .... Waynesville, Mo 
Dell, Isaac, .... Hamilton, Gage, Nebr 
Dell, Jacob, . . Duquesne, Allegheny, Pa 
Delp, Jacob, . Pearl City, Stephenson, 111 
Delp, Charles, . . . Carlisle, Lonoke, Ark 
Demmy, John C, . . . Astoria, Fulton, 111 

Demuth, Jos. H., York, N. Dak 

Denton, T. C, . Daleville, Botetourt, Va 
Derrick, Marvel, .... Snowflake, Tenn 
Dessenberg, Wm., .... Ashland, Ohio 
Detrick, J. B., . . . Earley, Mercer, Ohio 
Detweiler, D. T., Salemville, Bedford, Pa 

Dickey, L. H Alvada, Seneca, Ohio 

Dickey, A. M., . . . . McPherson, Kans 
Dickerson, Moses, .... Little River, Va 

Dickson, H Franklin, W. Va 

Dierdorff, Daniel, . . Franklin Grove, 111 
Dierdortf, Daniel T.,- . . . Pierson, Iowa 

Dierdorff, J. W., Maryland, 111 

Dierdorff, M Yale, Guthrie, Iowa 

Diehl, C. H Jonesboro, Tenn 

Diehl, John, . Carnforth, Poweshiek, Iowa 

Diehl, J. B., Carroll, Iowa 

Diehl, J. W., . . . Panora, Guthrie, Iowa 

DiQ,tz, J.F Johnstown, Pa 

Digman, Thomas B., Mt. Lake Park, Md 

Digman, S. P Mt. Lake Park, Md 

Dilling, David, . . Monticello, White, Ind 
Dilling, Levi S., . . . . Hagerstown, Ind 
Dilling, George, . Monticello, White, Ind 

Dillman, Morris, Peru, Ind 

Dively, Frederick C, Claysburg, Blair, Pa 
Dolby, Wiley, .... Jeffersonville, Ohio 

Dorer, Solomon, Johnstown, Pa 

Dove, F. W., Cabool, Texas, Mo 

Dove, Addison, Dovesville, Va 

Dove, J. A Cloverdale, Va 

Downing, A. S Gridley, Kans 

Driver, Samuel, . New Hope, Augusta, Va 

Driver, Jacob, Lima, Allen, Ohio 

Driver, Samuel, Lima, Allen, Ohio 

Driver, John F., Timberville, Va 

Duncan, A. H McMinnville, Tenn 

Duncan, A. B., . Oakhill, Fayette, W. Va 

Dunbar, L .M., Darlington, Ind 

Dunbar, Peter, . . . Bowers Station, Ind 



Early, S. P., . . . Salem, Marion, Oregon 
Early, J. B., . . . Salem, Marion, Oregon 

Early, H. C, Montevideo, Va 

Early, Isaac, .*.... North Liberty, Ind 

Early, Isaac, Norborne, Mo 

Early, John, . . Aurelia, Cherokee, Iowa 

Early, A. B., New Hope, Va 

Early, M. G., Nokesville, Va 

Eavey, George W., Calhoun, Richland, 111 
Ebert, Otis, . . Greenland, Grant, W. Va 

Ebersole, J. F., Salem, Oregon 

Eby, Josiah, Dayton, Ohio 

Eby, Isaac, . New Germantown, Perry, Pa 
Eby, J. G., Summerfield, Marshall, Kans 
Eby, Levi H., . . Barstow, Ward, Texas 

Eby, Enoch, Booth, Reno, Kans 

Eby, David B., . . Lena, Stephenson, 111 
Eby, Henry H., . Eldorado, Preble, Ohio 

Eby, S. M Winterhaven, Fla 

Eby, Benjamin, Manheim, Lancaster, Pa 

Eby, D. F., Westfield, Ind 

Eby, Ira P Laforge, Mo 

Eby, Josiah, New Germantown, Perry, Pa 

Eby, Adam Wawaka, Ind 

Eckard, David, . . . Walnut Bottom, Pa 

Ecker, Greenbury Uniontown, Md 

Edgecomb, Samuel, .... Plumb, Okla 

Ehlers, Henry, Little Rock, M» 

Eicher, John K Kecksburg, Pa 

Eikenberry, John, Plumtree, Ind 

Eikenberry, J. E., . . Farnhamville, Iowa 
Eikenberry, Harvey, Greene, Butler, Iowa 
Eikenberry, J. F., . Greene, Butler, Iowa 
Eikenberry, J. W., . . . Altamont, Kans 
Eikenberry, Wm. H., Worthington, Minn 
Filer, Calvin F., . Shideler, Delaware, Ind 
Eisenhour, M. A., Grand Harbor, N. Dak 

Eisenbise, P. A Morrill, Kans 

Eisenbise, P. J Sabetha, Kans 

Eisenbise. William H.. . . Mt. Carroll, 111 

Eisenbise, John, Morrill, Kans 

Eisenberg, J. Y., . . . East Coventry, Pa 
Elgin, William, . . . Charity, Patrick, Va 
Ellenberger, George, Turney, Clinton, Mo 
Ellenberger, J. E., . . Polo, Caldwell, Mo 
Eller, J. W., .... Sa^em, Roanoke, Va 

Filer, C. E., Salem, Va 

Eller, D. Newton, Daleville, Botetourt, Va 

Eller, G. R., Gardner, Kans 

EUis, O. C, . . . River, Huntington, Ind 

Ellis, C. C Huntingdon, Pa 

EUiott, George W., . . . Nickerson, Kans 

Elliott, y. M. Houston, Texas 

Elrod, Samuel, . . Gridley, Coffey, Kans 
Elson, J. H., .... Fairfield Center. Ind 

Emmert, M. W Adel, Iowa 

England, W. F Ashland, Ohio 

Engler, Philip, Uniontown, Md 

Ennis, Marshall M Fruitdale, Ala 

Erbaugh, G. W., . . New Lebanon, Ohio 

Eshelman, M. M., Colton, Cal 

Eshelman, Daniel M., Florin, Pa 

Eshelman, J. H., Batavia, Jefferson, Iowa 
Etter, Henry, . . . Kidder, Caldwell, Mo 
Etter, Henry, . . Beautiful, Franklin, Pa 

Etter, David, Hanover Dale, Pa 

Evans, Alex., .... Fayetteville, W. Va 

Everson, Thomas, Ladoga, Ind 

Eversole, Simon P Bremen, Ind 

Eversole, Silas N., . Devils Lake, N. Dak 
Everts, John D., . Wilsons Mills, W. V a 



40 



Brethreris Family Almanac 



Fadely, H. L., Honeycreek, Ind 

Fahrney, Callo, Polo, 111 

Fahrney, Peter D., .... Frederick, Md 

Faidley, H. E Burroak, Kans 

Fair, C. G., Garrett, Dekalb, Ind 

Falkenstein, George N 

. 6611 Germantown Ave., Phila., Pa 
Farneman, Frank, . . . Des Moines, Iowa 

Faust, Jeremiah, Jones Mills, Pa 

Faw, C. R., Salem, N. C 

Faw, Enoch, Cameron, Nez Perces, Idaho 

Feightner, Levi, Amoy, Ohio 

Felthouse, J. v., Markle, Ind 

Fergusen, Ashley, . . Erie, Whiteside, 111 

Ferguson, I. B., Bills, Pa 

Ferrel, A. J Ober. Ind 

Fesler, Frederic, . . . Ovid, Madison, Ind 

Fike, EmraT., Eglon, W. Va 

Fike, Samuel K., Eglon, W. Va 

Fike, John S., Eglon, W. Va 

Fike, Tobias S., Eglon, V^. Va 

Fike, Moses, . . . Eglon, Preston, W. Va 

Fike, A • Eglon, Preston, W. Va 

Fike, J. H., Waterloo, Iowa 

Fike, Jonas, . . . Eglon, Preston, W. Va 

Fike, Geo. D Racine, Mo 

Fike, S. A., . . . . Eglon. Preston, W. Va 
Fike, D. M., . . . Cadeton, Thayer, Nebr 

Filbrum, B. F Casstown, Ohio 

Filbrun, David S., . Brandt, Miami, Ohio 
Filbrun, Joseph, . . Heizer, Barton, Kans 

Fillmore, A. G Gushing, Okla 

Fink, Samuel, . . . Geneva, Adams, Ind 
Fishbaugher, Harvey, . . Granger, Minn 

Fisher, Jacob, Mexico, Ind 

Fisher, Perry A., . . . St. Albans, W. Va 

Fisher, Irvin, Mexico, Ind 

Fisher, Noah, Huntington, Ind 

Fisher, Frank Mexico, Miami, Ind 

Fisher, Ira, Colfax, Clinton, Ind 

Fisher, Enos, . . . Kewanna, Fulton, Ind 

Fitz, John, Astoria, Fulton, 111 

Fitz, John Panora, Guthrie, Iowa 

Fitz, Conrad, . . . Leeseburg, Fulton, 111 
Fitzwater, L. W., Bashan, Lincoln, Kans 

Fitzwater. S. W Dovesville, Va 

Fitzwater, P. B., Sheldon, Iowa 

Flack, L. H., . . . Emporia, Lyon, Kans 
Fleming, James W. . Purgitsville, W. Va 
Fleshman, L. A., Lindside, Monroe, W. Va 
Flohr, J. R., . . Fountaindale, Adams, Pa 
Flora, Riley, . . . Hickman, Franklin, Va 

Flora, A. W., Maxwell, Iowa 

Flora, M. A., .... Helms, Franklin, Va 
Flory, Newton B., . Pleasantdale, W. Va 

Flory, A. J Flora, Carroll, Ind 

Flory, Henry, Defiance, Ohio 

Flory, J. S., 236 S.Hancock St., . . . 

Los Angeles, Cal 

Flory, James, . . Shickley, Fillmore, Nebr 
Flory, George B., Lipscomb, Augusta, Va 
Flory, David, . . . Hastings, Barry, Mich 
Flory, Samuel . . . South English, Iowa 
Flory, Michael, . . Girard, Macoupin, 111 
Flory, George B., . . Helms, Franklin, Va 

Flory, D. C, New Hope, Va 

Flory, S. H Nokesville, Va 

Fluck, J. B Loysburg, Bedford, Pa 

Fogelsanger, J. R., . . Middle Spring, Pa 
Fogle, Caleb, .... Independence, Kans 
Folger, W. W Folger, Clarke, Iowa 



Follis, John, . . . Fredric, Monroe, Iowa 

Foltz, Samuel, Hagerstown, Md 

Forney, Isaac Ingram, Okla 

Forney, D. H Davenport, Nebr 

Forney, Clayborn, . . . Parkersburg, 111 
Forney, Edmund, . Pine Creek, Ogle, 111 
Forney, Henry, . . . Chenoa, McLean, 111 

Forney, Peter, Glendale, Ariz 

Forney, Benj., . Abilene, Dickinson, Kans 
Forney, S. M., . . Kearney, Buffalo, Nebr 
Forney, Hiram, . Milford, Kosciusko, Ind 
Forney, Samuel, Mondovi, Lincoln, Wash 
Forrer, Samuel, .... Herington, Kans 
Forrer, John, . Stuarts Draft, Augusta, Va 

Foster, Joseph F., Luray, Va 

Fox, E. S., Walker, Kans 

Frank, D, R., . . Somerset, Wabash, Ind 
Franklin, Wm. H., . . . Sams Creek, Md 

Franklin, W. K Lordsburg, Cal 

Frantz, J. L., . . Degraff, Logan, Ohio 

Frantz, Mathias, Ladoga, Ind 

Frantz, J. R., . . Beattie, Marshall, Kans 
Frantz, Isaac, . Pleasanthill, Miami, Ohio 
Frantz, Henry, . . . Forgy, Clarke, Ohio 
Frantz, Charles, . . . Laureldale, W. Va 
Frantz, David, . . . Cerrogordo, Piatt, 111 
Frantz, Abram, ..... Dawson, W. Va 

Frantz, Edward McPherson, Kans 

Freed, Peter, ^ew Stark, Ohio 

Freeman, D. R., Star City, Ind 

Frederick, J. E Salem, Marion, 111 

Frederic, C, . . ■ . Grundy Center, Iowa 

Fretz, William Hatfield, Pa 

Friedly, John Gooseneck, W. Va 

Fryfogle, Addison, Seward, Kans 

Fryfogle, Benjamin F., . . Sunfield, Mich 

Fulk, George H Fulks Run, Va 

Fuller, Harry, Oakwood, Ohio 

Funk, Peter Gallion, Iowa 

Fyock, Abram, . Johnstown, Cambria, Pa 
Fyock, J. W., Purchase Line, Indiana, Pa 

Gable, Eli, Plymouth, Ind 

Gable, John, .... Ollie, Keokuk, Iowa 
Garber, Joel, . . . Marmaros, Stone, Mo 

Garber, Simon Fremont, Ohio 

Garber, Levi, . Mt. Sidney, Augusta, Va 
Garber, A. D., . Mt. Sidney, Augusta, Va 

Garber, J. R Rockwell City, Kans 

Garber, Henry P., . . Portland, Jay, Ind 

Garber, B. F., Timberville, Va 

Garber, Jacob, Trotwood, Ohio 

Garber, Jacob Greenmount, Va 

Garber, D. B., . . . Hanfie'.d, Grant, Ind 

Garber, Peter Weyers Cave,Va 

Garber, S. W Allison, 111 

Garber, Jacob C, . . . . Barrenridge, Va 

Garber, S. H., Leesburg, Tenn 

Garber, C. S Fort Scott, Kans 

Garber, John H New Market, Va 

Garland, John C, . . . Pleasantridge, Pa 

Garman, John H Harlem, Fla 

Garner, Charles, . . Grundy Centre, Iowa 

Garner, J. D., Beautiful, Pa 

Garst, Henry, Blountville, Tenn 

Garst, Isaac B., . . . . Appanoose, Kans 

Garst, J. H Blountville, Tenn 

Garst, George, Madison, Kans 

Garst, Noah N Blountville, Tenn 

Garst, J. O Dayton, Ohio 

Garver, Daniel M., . . Farmersville, Ohio 
Garver, Samuel, Chatham, Ohio 



€ 

Garver, John E., . . Cora, Huntingdon, Pa 
Gauby, Martin D., . . Washington, Kans 
Gauby, JohnM., . . . Washington, Kans 
Gault, Samuel, .... Avilla, Jasper, Mo 

Gaunt, W. A Elklick, Pa 

George, T. Ezra Antioch. W. Va 

George, Wm., Martin, W. Va 

Gephart, J. W., . Arkadelphia, Clark, Ark 
Gerdes. David, . Morrison, Whiteside, 111 

Gerhart, Jacob Allison, 111 

Gibble, Isaac, . . . Hemet, Riverside, Cal 
Gibble, Cyrus R., . . . Brunnersville, Pa 

Gibble, Hiram, Whiteoak, Pa 

Gibson, Javan, . . . Girard, Macoupin, III 
Gibson, G. W., . . Maxwell, Story, Iowa 
Gibson, Charles, . . Girard, Macoupin, 111 
Gibson, Cullen C, . Girard, Macoupin, 111 

Gibson, D. B Cerrogordo, 111 

Giffin, E. J., . Mont Ida, Anderson, Kans 
Gigax, Godfrey, . . New Lancaster, Kans 
Gilbert, Frank, Pearl City, Stephenson, 111 
Gilbert, James Z., . . . . Belleville, Kans 
Gilbert, Greenberg, . . New Canton, Tenn 

Gilchrist, Joseph, Fairfield, Iowa 

Ginrich, A. B„ . . Fontana, Lebanon, Pa 

Gillett, C. E Glendale, Ariz 

Gilliam, Harvey, . . Fredericksburg, Iowa 

Gish, G Deer Park, Texas 

Gish, J. W Holmesville, Gage, Nebr 

Glen, John, . Wardensville, Hardy, W. Va 

Glick, Joel Mound City, Mo 

Glick, Jacob D Lilly, Va 

Glotfelty, James, . . . Libertyville, Iowa 
Glotfelty, Wm. N., . . Libertyville, Iowa 
Gnagey, Joel, . Meyersdale, Somerset, Pa 

Good, M. J Mt. Jackson, Va 

Goodman, John W., Woburn, 111 

Gordon, Daniel, . . . Pound Grove, Okla 

Gorham, A. L Clarkson. Okla 

Goshorn, Benj. F., . . . . Clay City, Ind 

Goshorn, R. R., Woodside, Ind 

Goshorn, G.V., .... Whiterocks, Utah 

Gotwalls, Jacob Z., Oaks, Pa 

Gochenour, E., . . . Bigmount, York, Pa 
Goughnour, Samuel M., . . Elkhart, Iowa 

Goughnour, James Q Elkhart, Iowa 

Grady, Isaac S., Syracuse, Kosciusko, Ind 
Graham, J. H., . Downington, Meigs, Ohio 
Graham, Thomas, . . Holmesville, Nebr 

Grater, A. L Royersford, Pa 

Grater. W. H Malvern, 111 

Graybill, Israel, . . . Penn, Lancaster, Pa 

Graybill, Reuben Manheim, Pa 

Graybill, George Brughs Mill, Va 

Graybill, Jonas, Brughs Mill, Va 

Graybill, Jas. H., . Roanoke, Roanoke, Va 

Gray, S. S W^arriorsmark, Pa 

Gray, E. D Limestone, Tenn 

Green, John C, Lonaconing, Md 

Greenwood, J. W., . . Cabool, Texas, Mo 

Gresso, Jacob McDonalds Mill, Va 

Gripe, N. S Clarkson, Okla 

Griffeth, J. M., . Brummetts Creek, N. C 

Groff, Joseph, Covington, Ohio 

Groff, Nathan, ..... North Star, Ohio 

Groff, Hershey Bareville, Pa 

Grossnickle, S. P., . . . . Edenton, Ohio 

Groves, CM Overhill, W. Va 

Guinn, Isaiah Heath, Ind 

Gump, Jeremiah Ari, Noble, Ind 

Gump, Henry, . . Tippecanoe City, Ohio 



3 ^ 

Gump, S. S., • • • Tippecanoe City, Ohio 
Gustin, D. W., . Middletown, Henry, Ind 
Guthrie, Joseph, .... Hazelton, W. Va 

Guthrie, W. R., Herring, Ohio 

Guthrie, J. L., Herring, Ohio 

Gwinn, Jacob Moscow, Idaho 

Haas, L, Frank Philadelphia, Pa 

Hackman, Jacob, . Oregon, Lancaster, Pa 

Hagerman, Geo Toddville, Iowa 

Haines, A. H New Haven, Conn 

Hall, Larkin, . . . Montour, Tama, Iowa 

Hall, Wm. I., Marysville, Va 

Hale, Darlin, . . Bourbon, Marshall, Ind 

Hahn, M. L Seafield, Ind 

Hahn,J., Lakeside, Ind 

Hahn, M. W., . . North Georgetown, Ohio 
Haldeman, Samuel, Morrill, Brown, Kans 

Hamm, Solomon D Astoria, 111 

Hammon, Peter Atwood, Ind 

Hamstead, Obed Eglon, W. Va 

Hanawalt, George Boucher, Pa 

Hanawalt, W. C, . . . Hollidaysburg, Pa 

Handy, Wm. H. Furches, N. C 

Hantz, J. F., Covina, Cal 

Harader, Lee, .... Pioneer, Barry, Mo 
Harader, 1. L., . . . . Carrington, N. Dak 
Harader, C, . . . . Arkansas City, Kans 

Harden, Thomas Hyndman, Pa 

Hardman, D. C. Hamilton, Mo 

Harlacher. J. A East Berlin, Pa 

Harman, Ananias, . Abraham, Floyd, Va 
Harman, Wm., . Tontogany, Wood, Ohio 

Harman, B. J Bladensburg, Iowa 

Harnish, Jacob, Dorrance, Kans 

Harp, Geo. S., . . EUerton, Frederick, Md 
Harp, James, . . Hedges, Paulding, Ohio 
Harris, James P., . . . Cabool, Texas, Mo 
Harris, Isham, .... Ergo, Newton, Mo 
Harris, W. D., . . . . Cabool, Texas, Mo 
Harris, I. L., . . . . . Cabool, Texas, Mo 
Harrold, Albert, . . . Columbiana, Ohio 

Harshbjrger, Isaac, Girard, 111 

Harshbarger, Joshua P., 

. 415 W. 6th St., Hutchinson, Kans 
Harshbarger, John, . . . Jeffersonville, 111 

Harshbarger, J. W., Girard, 111 

Harshbarger, John, .... Johnstown, Pa 
Harshbarger, Wm. R., . . . Ladoga, Ind 
Harshman, Samson, . Centropolis, Kans 

Harrison, John C Conemaugh, Pa 

Harter, A. L., McPherson, Kans 

Hartman, Daniel B., . . South Bend, Ind 
Hartsough, Joseph, .... Nappanee, Ind 

Hartsough, John Knox, Stark, Ind 

Harvey, William, . . . Jasper, Jasper, Mo 

Harvey, Amos Jasper, Jasper, Mo 

Hatchor, Wm. L., Ridgeway, Ind 

Haughtelin, J. D., Panora, Iowa 

Hawbaker, A. W., . . . Kenmare, N. Dak 
Hawke, Martin R., . . . Childress, Tenn 

Hays, Daniel, Broadway, Va 

Hays, J. S Cherrybox, Shelby, Mo 

Hazlett, James L., Rossville, Clinton, Ind 

Heckler, Jesse Y Elmwood, Nebr 

Heckman, C. T., .... Garlington, Kans 

Heckman, John Polo, Ogle, 111 

Heestand, A. I., Smithville, Ohio 

Heeter, N. B., . Warsaw, Kosciusko, Ind 

Heeter, G. B., Huntington, Ind 

Hege, George, . Williamson, Franklin, Pa 
Heiny.D.B., ..,,.. . 3hickley, Nebr 



Brethreris Family Almanac, 



41 



Heiple, Theo., Boucher, Pa 

Heisy, Martin, . . Cornwall, Lebanon, Pa 

Heistand, Jacob, Hoaglin, Ohio 

Heitz, S., Cerrogordo, 111 

Heifer, P., Plymouth, Ohio 

Heller, Jacob, . . . Decatur, Adams, Ind 

Helm, C. A Nova, Ohio 

Helman, James Q Castle, Ind 

Henricks, Zaccheus Hoyle, Okla 

Hendrickson, D. C, . West Milton, Ohio 

Henry, Samuel Belleville, Kans 

Hendricks, , Plymouth, Ind 

Herman, Michael, . . Adair, Adair, Iowa 
Herr, John, . . Myerstown, Lebanon, Pa 
Herr, Tobias, . Millersville, Lancaster, Pa 
Hershberger, I. A. B., . . . . Liberty, Va 

Hershberger, J. S., Everett, Pa 

Hershberger, Solomon, . . Valley Mill, Pa 
Hershey, Emmanuel, . Gettysburg, Ohio 

Hershey, Daniel Mt. Morris, 1)1 

Hertzler, Ephraim, . Pleasantgrove, Kans 

Hertzler, John Bethel, Pa 

Hertzler, Jonas, . . . Pawnee Rock, Kans 
Hertzler, Saml. H., . . Elizabethtown, Pa 

Hertzog, P. H., Olathe, Kans 

Hess, Aaron Goshen, Ind 

Hess, Wm Goshen, Ind 

Hetrick, J. P East Coventry, Pa 

Hetrick. David A Kellersburg, Pa 

Hiatt, M Avoca, Iowa 

Hiatt, Nathan C Atlantic, Iowa 

Hiatt, Elihu, .... Rigdon, Grant, Ind 
Hicks, Oliver Z., . Idlewood, Jefferson, 111 
Hieshman, Geo., . . Wardensville, W. Va 

Highbarger, O. S Burkittsville, Md 

Hilbert, John B Leesburg, Tenn 

Hildebrand, David, . . . Conemaugh, Pa 
Hildebrand, Christ, . . . South Bend, Ind 
Hilderbrand, Jacob, . . . Walkerton, Ind 
Hilderbrand, J. D., . . . Mound City, Mo 
Hilkey, James E,, . . . Overbrook, Kans 
Hillery, Lemuel, Teegarden, Marshall, Ind 

Hillery, C Worthington, Minn 

Hill, James, . . . . Cicero, Hamilton, Ind 
Himes, W. B., . Dorrance, Russell, Kans 
Hinegardner, B. D., . Lost River, W. Va 
Hinkle, James, . . . Johnson City, Tenn 
Hipes.Wm. C, . . Kidder, Caldwell, Mo 
Hockman, John, . . Pleasantdale, W. Va 

Hochsjettler, H. P Rummel, Pa 

Hochstettler, Josiah, . . . Mt. Hope, Ohio 
Hochstettler, David, . . Engles Mills, Md 

Hostetler, E. K., Pocohontas, Pa 

Hodge, Josiah, Piney Flats, Sullivan, Tenn 
Hodgden, Merrill, . . . Galesburg, Kans 
Hodgden, Sidney, .... Galesburg, Kans 
Hodgden, Dorsey, . . . Huntington, Ind 

Hoff,E. B., McPherson, Kans 

Hohf, Henry, .... Blackrock, York, Pa 
Hohf, D. B., . . Smiths Station, York, Pa 
Hoke, Jonas, Leetonia, Columbiana, Ohio 
Hoke, Henry, . Rehoboth, Harrison, Ind 

Hoke, Levi, Goshen, Ind 

Holder, Joseph, Cando, N. Dak 

Holder, Daniel, . Batavia, Jefferson, Iowa 

Holder, Levi, Summitville, Ind 

Holderman, Jacob, Acton, Okla 

Holderman, Michael, . . . Pinegrove, Pa 
Holderman, Christian, . . . Carthage, Mo 

Hollar, M. P., Fox, Ray, Mo 

Hpller.John, ,.,.,,.. Valley, Okla 



Holler, George Dayton, Ohio 

Holler, George, Huntington, Ind 

Hollinger, Joseph, . . Astoria, Fulton, 111 
Hollinger, John, . Russell, Russell, Kans 
Hollinger, Daniel, . . Astoria, Fulton, 111 
HoUinger, Abram K., . . Harrisburg, Pa 
HoUinger, Daniel, Hope, Dickinson, Kans 

Hollinger, Jacob Greenspring, Pa 

Hollinger, Albert 

349 nth St., S. E., Washington, D. C 
Hollinger, David, North Manchester, Ind 

Hollinger, Moses, Baker, Ohio 

Hollinger, Jacob, . . Wawaka, Noble, Ind 

Hollinger, Henry, Fontana, Pa 

Holloway, James Centreview, Mo 

Holmes, Eli, Smithville, Ohio 

Holsberry, James Corinth, W. Va 

Holsinger, Wm., Rosedale, Kans 

Holsinger, Levi Ladoga, Ind 

Holsinger, C. S., Bellevi-lle, Kans 

Holsinger, John S., . . . . Nokesville, Va 
Holsinger, J. L., . . . Bakers Summit, Pa 
Holsinger, Levi, . Waterside, Bedford, Pa 

Holsinger, Merton, Ladoga, Ind 

Holsinger, D. R Belleville, Kans 

Holsopple, Ira C, Indiana, Pa 

Holsopple, Jacob, Geistown, Pa 

Holsopple, Joseph, . Indiana, Indiana, Pa 
Holsopple, W. W., ... St. Martins, Mo 

Holsopple, F. F Parkerford, Pa 

Honberger, S. A., Roanoke, La 

Honeyman, B, F Center, Ohio 

Hoover, Isaac L., . Alfred, Douglas, Kans 
Hoover, Jonathan, . . Oran, Shelby, Ohio 

Hoover, John J., Macon, Colo 

Hoover, Cyrus, Weilersville, Wayne, Ohio 

Hoover, David E., Garrett, Ind 

Hoover, David F., . Sulphur Springs, Ind 

Hoover, J. L Sulphur Springs, Ind 

Hoover, Tobias Chatham, Ohio 

Hoover, Joseph J., Barryville, Stark, Ohio 
Hoover, Jacob, . Hagerstown, Wayne, Ind 

Hoover, Silas Bills, Pa 

Hoover, O. P Dayton, Ohio 

Hoover, W. I. T., Dayton, Ohio 

Hooper, C. J., . . Sabetha, Nemaha, Kans 

Hope, C, Herington, Kans 

Hopkins, Ernest Dayton, Wash 

Hoppock, J. D., . . . Sergeantsyille, N. J 
Hopwood, G. W., .... Deepriver, Iowa 
Horn, Elijah, Roseville, Muskingum, Ohio 

Horner, D. D Jones Mills, Pa 

Horning, W. W., . . . Frederick, S. Dak 
Horning, Samuel, . . New Lebanon, Ohio 
Horning, S, H., .... Frederick, S. Dak 

Horning, Jonas Johnsville, Ohio 

Hosfeld, C. F., Shippensburg, Pa 

Hostetter, D. W., .... Wappecong, Ind 
Hottenstein, Amos, . East Petersburg, Pa 
Houk, Peter, . . Ridgeway, Howard, Ind 

Howard, I. J., Hartford City, Ind 

Howe, W. M., . . . . Sergeantsville, N. J 

Hoxie, G. W., Williams, Oregon 

Huber, Lewis Berne, Adams, Ind 

Huber, Calvin, Wawaka, Ind 

Hufford, D. A., Cando, N. Dak 

Hufford, Isaac, Clarion, Charlevoix, Mich 
Huffman, Lewis, . . Mt. Zion, Wells, Ind 

Huffman, Peter, Elkhart, Ind 

Huffman, J. B. F.,' . . . . Rileysville, Va 
Hugendougler, J., Deepwater, Mq 



42 



BrctJirefLs Family Almaiiac. 



Hull, Abraham, Hall, York, Pa 

Hull, R. T., . . Bakersville, Somerset, Pa 

Hultgren, O Marquette, Kans 

Humbarger, John, Verdon, Nebr 

Humbarger, Loren, . Columbia City, Ind 
Hummer, Fred, . . . Blaine, Jay, Indiana 

Hummer, S. S., Colchester, 111 

Hutchison, A., McPherson, Kans 

Hutchison, Jas. A., Cordova, Md 

Hutchinson, Geo Lindside, W. Va 

Huttle, Benj Passer, Bucks, Pa 

Hyde, Robinson, .... Sandbrook, N. J 

Hyer, Enoch, Whitfield, Ohio 

Hyer, Leonard, . . . Merriam, Noble, Ind 

Hylton.H. P., Hylton, Floyd, Va 

Hylton, CD., Hawthorn, Fla 

Hylton, B. B., Idumea, Mo 

Hylton, Jacob, .... Hylton, Floyd, Va 

Hylton, Josepli, Pax, Floyd, Va 

Hylton, Austin, Pax, Floyd, Va 

Hylton, Joseph B., Idumea, Mo 

Hylton, John W. B Olathe, Mo 

Hylton, A. N., . . . . Hylton, Floyd, Va 

Ihrig, J.B., Avery, Mo 

Ikenberry, Samuel M., .... Helms, Va 
Ikenberry, Henry, . . Wirtz, Franklin, Va 
Ikenberry, John, . . Nora, Nuckolls, Nebr 
Ikenberry, W. Lewis, . . . Mt. Morris, 111 
Ikenberry, L. D., 

. . . 1228 Conn St., Lawrence, Kans 

Ikenberry, J. W Daleville, Va 

Imler, T. F., 

. . 307 W. Lemon St., Lancaster, Pa 
Irvin, David M., . . Orrville, Wayne, Ohio 
Isenburg. W. D., . . . Gillenwater, Tenn 

Iset, John, Graters Ford, Pa 

Ives, Allen, .... Burroak, Jewell, Kans 
Jamison, Geo. M., Arritts, Alleghany, Va 

Jamison, John Potts Creek, Va 

Jamieson, B. F., . Copen, Braxton, W. Va 

Jarboe, J. W., Lovewell, Nebr 

Jellison, J. H., . . . Allison, Lawrence, 111 
John, Eleazer, . . . Leeton, Johnson, Mo 
John, J. J., . . . Daleville, Botetourt, Va 

John, E. E Leeton, Mo 

/ohnson, Wm., 

• • • 1533 Orange St., Wichita, Kans 
Johnson, Stephen, Garrison, Benton, Iowa 
Johnson, Isaiah C, . . . Meyersdale, Pa 

Johnson, J. C, 

77 S. Mt. Vernon St., Uniontown, Pa 
Jones, Henry, . West Milton, Miami, Ohio 

Jones, E. S., Eldora, Iowa 

Jones, S. P Brooklyn, S. C 

Jones, Joseph Farmersville, 111 

Jones, Louis, Cubage, Bell, Ky 

Jones, D. H., Dunlaps, Ind 

Jordan, J. L., . . . . Collins, St. Clair, Mo 

Joseph, J. E., Bourbon, Ind 

Joyce, Edward, Barron, Wis 

Joyce, E.E., Durand, Wis 

Julius. Aaron, . . Dospalos, Merced, Cal 

Just, Cyrus A Rockwood, Pa 

Kagey, Jos. M., Dayton, Rockingham, Va 
Kahler, John F., . . Box 127, Canton, Ohio 

Karns, Gabriel, Easton, Ind 

Katherman, J., . Gettysburg, Darke, Ohio 
Katherman, S. B., . . . Lawrence, Kans 
Kauffman, J. S., Berlinton, Marshall, Ind 
Kauffman, Solomon, . . Oakland Mills, Pa 
JC^im, Howard H., Ladoga. Ind 



Keim, David, . . .St. Peters, Chester, Pa 

Keiser,J.W Primrose, Ohio 

Keiser, Thos., . . Roanoke, Woodford, 111 

Keith, Jacob F., Campcreek, Va 

Keith, Z., Santos, Floyd, Va 

Keller, Henry, . . . North Liberty, Ohio 
Keller, Henry, . Osceola, Crawford, Ohio 

Keller, J. H., Livingston, Iowa 

Keller, G., . . . . Bunkerhill, Miami, Ind 
Keller, I. B., . . . Lincoln, Lancaster, Pa 
Keller, J. E., .... Tipton, Cedar, Iowa 
Keller, Michael, Galva, McPherson, Kans 

Keller, Jacobs., Millstone, Md 

Kelley, H. N., . . . . Burlington, W. Va 

Kelso, Jonathan, Carleton, Nebr 

Kendall, Amos, Plevna, Ind 

Kendig, E. D., Stuarts Draft, Va 

Kendig, J. R., Stuarts Draft, Va 

Kennedy, James, . . Camden, Carroll, Ind 

Kesler, Benj. E., Dryden, Ark 

Kessler, Joseph, . . Pleasant Home, Ohio 
Keltner, P. R., 702 E. gth St., Sterling, 111 
Keltner, Lewis E., . . . . Pearl City, 111 

Killingsworth, Abel, Rainey, Mo 

Killian, John, Antwerp, Ohio 

Kilpatrick, J. W., Fish Top, N. C 

Kimmel, Lewis, Elderton, Armstrong, Pa 
Kimmel, J. T., . . Mishler, Portage, Ohio 
Kindig, J.J., . . . Juniata, Adams, Nebr 
King, Joshua Y., . . Griffin, Caroline, Md 

Kinsey, Jesse, Clayton, Ohio 

Kinsey, Lewis, . Hagerstown, Wayne, Ind 
Kinsley, Chas., . . Hartville, Stark, Ohio 
Kintner, Jacob, . . Moats, Defiance, Ohio 
Kintner, W. I.. . . . . Mark Center, Ohio 

Kirakofe, B. A., Stover, Va 

Kirk, D. W Colfax, Marion, W. Va 

Kirklin, J. R New Burlington, Ind 

Kitterman, G., Montpelier, Ind 

Kittinger, B. F Ambler, Pa 

Klepper, Peter, Alumwell, Tenn 

Klepper, D. B., . . . Cloyds Creek, Tenn 
Klepinger, William, .... Dayton, Ohio 

Kline, M. B. E., Broadway, Va 

Kline, H. S.. 2000 Center Ave., Reading, Pa 
Kline, John H., . . . Cowan's Depot, Va 

Kline, J. Saml., Broadway, Va 

Kline, Daniel R., . . . Bethel, Berks, Pa 
Knavel, Peter, . Scalp Level, Cambria, Pa 

Knisley, Christian, Everett, Pa 

Knisley, Geo., . . Tatesville, Bedford, Pa 

Kob, L. M., Gardengrove, Iowa 

Kolb, T. J., . . . . Double Pipecreek, Md 
Kollar, G. V., . . New Philadelphia, Ohio 
Kollar. Peter, . . New Philadelphia, Ohio 
Koontz, Jacob, . . Loysburg, Bedford, Pa 
Koontz, Wm., . Shadygrove, Franklin, Pa 

Kopenhaver, Wm Mt. Carmcl, Pa 

Krabill,JohnP., . . Prairie Depot, Ohio 

Krabill, C Farmer, Defiance, Ohio 

Kreider, David, . . . South Whitley, Ind 
Kreider, Tobias, . . . Painter Creek, Ohio 
Kreighbaum, H. W.. . . South Bend. Ind 
Krewson, Wm. A., . . . Cincinnati, Iowa 

Kulp, Isaac, Graters Ford, Pa 

Kulp, J.S., . . . . Dunlaps, Elkhart, Ind 
Kurtz, J. H., . . Poland, Mahoning, Ohio 
Kurtz, John., . . . Hartville, Stark, Ohio 

Kutz. Daniel De Turksville. Pa 

Lair, John M Custer. Mich 

Lake, Daniel B., . . . . Harrisonville, Pa 



Lambert, Amby, .... Bridgewater, Va 

Landis, Joseph, Gordon. Ohio 

Landis, Daniel Bowmansdale, Pa 

Landis, F. B., Acton, Okla 

Landis, Elias, . . . Richfield, Juniata. Pa 
Landis, Henry, . Bringhurst, Carroll, Ind 

Landis, Bartley Hollowtown, Ohio 

Landis. G. W Acton, Okla 

Lane, James C Bigtunnei, Va 

Lane, James R Shirleysburg, Pa 

Lanter, George M., . . . Union City. Ind 

Lantz, S. E., Greenwood, Kans 

Lapp. Christian, . Cherrybox, Shelby, Mo 

Lapp, Oliver J., Moorefield, Nebr 

Larick, Henry, Montevista, Colo 

Larimere, John, . . . Whites Store, Tenn 
Larkins, S. O., 

. . (Rowland Park), Baltimore, Md 
Laughrun, A. M., . Relief, Mitchell, N. C 
Laughrun, Marion, Relief, Mitchell, N. C 

Lauver, Geo. M McPherson, Kans 

Layman, J. T Daleville, Va 

Leaman, W. H., Madison, Kans 

Leatherman, J. M,, . Purgitsville, W. Va 
Leatherman, George, . . . Harmony, Md 
Leatherman, Geo. W., . . Keyser, W. Va 

Leatherman, J. R., Woodley, Fla 

Leatherman, I. W., .... Woodley. Fla 
Leatherman, David, . New Carlisle, Ohio 
Leatherman, J. N., . . Purgitsville, W. Va 
Leavelle, O. W., .... Unionville, Iowa 
Leckrone, Quincy, .... Ziontown, Ohio 
Leckrone, Samuel, North Manchester, Ind 
Leckrone, Emmanuel, . . Silverlake, Ind 

Leedy, Daniel, Albany, Oregon 

Leedy, Amos, Williamsburg, 111 

Leedy, Joseph, Andrews, Ind 

Leedy, Abram, Andrews. Ind 

Leedy. John H Toms Brook, Va 

Leer, Benjamin, .... Shipshewana, Ind 

Lefever, Elias B . Ephrata, Pa 

Leftwich, J. P., . . Gillaspie, Bedford, Va 
Lehman, James P., 

. 538 W. Philadelphia St., York, Pa 
Lehman, J B., Crowson, Lawrence, Tenn 
Lehman, Josiah, St. Martins, Morgan, Mo 

Lehman, Franklin B Pierson, Iowa 

Lehman. Samuel, Jr., . Franklin Grove, 111 
Lehman, Hiram, . Geistown, Cambria, Pa 
Lehmer, S. G., . . East Los Angeles, Cal 
Lelmer, John, .... Upton, Franklin, Pa 
Lemon, J. D., . . . Juniata, Adams, Nebr 

Lentz, G. W., Adrian, Bates. Mo 

Lerew, Lewis, . . . Portis. Osborne, Kans 
Lerew, Isaac S., . . Portis, Osborne, Kans 

Lesh, John Flora, Carroll, Inu 

Lesley, Eli, Nevada, Vernon, Mo 

Lewis, Arthur, . . . Utica, Winona, Minn 
Lewis, J. G., . . Medina, Washington, Va 

Lewis, S. E Roanoke, La 

Lierly, Wm. R Clayton, Adams, III 

Lichtenwalter, A. B., . . . Neutral, Kans 

Lichty, W H., Waterloo, Iowa 

Light, H. E., . Mountville, Lancaster, Pa 
Light, Joseph B., . . . Greenspring, Ohio 

Light, Caleb Decatur, Burt, Nebr 

Lilligh, Henry, .... Woburn, Bond, 111 

Lilly. J. H Columbia City, Ind 

Lilly, Thomas Johnson City, Tenn 

Lilly, Andrew J Lavvson, Tenn 

Lingenfelter, Mathias, .... Canton, 111 



Brethren s Family Almartac. 



43 



Lint, C. G., . . Meyersdale, Somerset, Pa 
Long, W. Joseph, . . Tipton, Cedar, Iowa 

Long, Walter S., Tyrone, Pa 

Long, Victor, Fairplay, Md 

Long, David, Fairplay, Md 

Long, Joseph, 20 Belvidere St., York, Pa 
Long, Peter, . . Brighton, Lagrange, Ind 

Long, Emmanuel Bridgewater, Va 

Long, Daniel H Peru, Miami, Ind 

Long, Orrville V., . . . Abbottstown, Pa 
Long, W, H., . . Garrison, Benton, Iowa 

Longanecker, Daniel Paola, Kans 

Longanecker, J., . West Manchester, Ohio 

Longanecker, H. C, 

729 Soutli St., Sidney, Ohio 

Longanecker, J. H., Palmyra, Pa 

Longanecker, Noah, . . . Hartville, Ohio 
Loomis, Ed., . . New Philadelphia, Ohio 
Loose, S. M., . Fremont, Sandusky, Ohio 

Lorah, Daniel, St. Joseph, Mo 

Love, Leonard F., . . . Castle Rock, Colo 

Lovegrove, J. W Telford, Tenn 

Lowry, Geo. W., . . Glade, Somerset, Pa 
Lucas, C, . Prairie City, McDonough, 111 

Lugenbeel, Wm., Hubbell, Nebr 

Lutz, A. H., . . . . Waddams Grove, 111 
Lutz, Ezra, . . . Winslow, Stephenson, 111 

Lutz, G. H St. Joseph, Mo 

Care of Mo. & Kan. Tel. Co 

Lutz, Orman H., 

607 S. Fourteenth St., St. Joseph, Mo 
Lyon, Thomas D., . Hudson, McLean, 111 
Lytle, David, . . . Deshler, Henry, Ohio 

Macy, Lewis, Fox, Ray, Mo 

Maddock, T. B., . . Clovercreek, Blair, Pa 

Maderia, Charles Milton Grove, Pa 

Mahle, Edward, . . Fryburg, Clarion, Pa 
Mahler, Geo., . . Pioneer, Williams, Ohio 

Mahorney, J. W., Brooks, Kans 

Mallow, W. D., . . . . Austin, Ross, Ohio 
Mansfield, Morgan, . . Frederick, S. Dak 
Manon, George, . . . Gypsum City, Kans 
Mark, John, .... Edon, Williams, Ohio 

Markey, E. A Centerview, Mo 

Markiey, David, . Mt. Etna, Adams, Iowa 

Martin, Henry M. Lanark, 111 

Martin, N., Hagerstown, Md 

Martin, J. F., . . . Bradford, Miami, Ohio 

Martin, D. B Albert, Kans 

Mason, J. T., Cabool, Texas, Mo 

Mason, John H., Stet, Mo 

Mast, Enos, Neutral, Kans 

Masterson, E. K McPherson, Kans 

Masterson, B. F., Lordsburg, Cal 

Mathis, Jefferson, .... Winterset, Iowa 
Mathias, S., . . Lost River, Hardy, W. Va 

Maurery, John, Goodland, Ind 

Maust, S. P., . Meyersdale, Somerset, Pa 

Maust, C. H., Struble.Iowa 

Maust, H. F., . . Struble, Plymouth, Iowa 
Mays, I. C, . . . . Cedarville, Dade, Mo 
May, James, (col.), . . . Circleville, Ohio 
May, Charles E., (col.), . Circleville, Ohio 
McCann, Wm. J., . . Indiancamp, W. Va 
McCarty. John S., . . . Clarkesville, Ind 

McClure, M. J., Cerrogordo, 111 

McCrea, James, . . Berwyn, Custer, Nebr 
McCune. R. F., . . . Dallas Center, Iowa 

McDannell, D. S., Mt. Morris, 111 

McDonald, A. C Hardin, Ray, Mo 

McKeehan, E. K Jonesboro, Tenn 



McKimmey, Perry, . . . Metamora, Ohio 
McKimmey, Wm., . . . Metamora, Ohio 

McClane, John, Knox, N. Dak 

McLellan, W. P Litchfield, Nebr 

McMahon, John, . Alton, Upshur, W. Va 

McMullen, J., Mansfield, Ohio 

McNutt, C. S., . . . Panther, Dallas. Iowa 
Meek, Levi L., . . . Octavia, Butler, Nebr 
Mellott, Absalom, .... Gem, Fulton, Pa 
Merkey, Jacob, .... Washington, Kans 
Merrill, David M., .... Lonaconing, Md 

Messner, Peter B Campbell, Mich 

Metz, O South Whitley, Ind 

Metz, Clifford W., Trimble,'lll 

Metzgar, Robert, . . Denver, Miami, Ind 
Metzgar, John W., .... Lordsburg, Cal 

Metzler, J., Wakarusa, Ind 

Meyers, J. T., . . Oaks, Montgomery, Pa 
Meyers, David, . . . New Cambria, Kans 
Meyers, J. D., . . Ramona, Marion, Kans 

Meyers, Samuel, Codorus, Pa 

Miller, Isaac A., . . . Stover, Augusta, Va 

Miller, Daniel, Mendon, Ohio 

Miller, Daniel, Mercersburg, Franklin, Pa 
Miller, Andrews, . . . Port Republic, Va 

Miller, S. P., New Sharon, Iowa 

Miller, Howard, . . Lewisburg, Union, Pa 

Miller, B. W Advance, Indiana, Pa 

Miller, M. C, . . . North Manchester, Ind 
Miller, Isaac, . . . North Manchester, Ind 

Miller, E. A., Lordsburg, Cal 

Miller, B. B., . .' . . . . Greenmount, Va 

Miller, P. S., Roanoke, Va 

Miller, John A., Bridgewater, Va 

Miller, S. M., Calvin, Iowa 

Miller, S.H., Waterloo, Iowa 

Miller, Abednego, . Degraff, Logan, Ohio 

Miller, N. J., Waterloo, Iowa 

Miller, J. A., Manvel, Texas 

Miller, S. G., . Bolivar, Westmoreland, Pa 
Miller, George H., . . . Point, Bedford, Pa 
Miller, Alexander, .... Nappanee, Ind 
Miller, B. F., . . . . Dallas Center, Iowa 

Miller, Daniel, Weyers Cave, Va 

Miller, Isaac H., . Abbyville, Reno, Kans 

Miller, Joseph M., Ottobine, Va 

Miller, Joseph A., .... Sangerville, Va 
Miller, Anthony A., . . . Sangerville, Va 
Miller, David J., Overhill, Upshur, W. Va 
Mi]ler,,Benjamin, .... Greenmount, Va 
Miller, Isaac, . . Woodland, Barry, Mich 

Miller, D. P., South Bend, Ind 

Miller', Henderson, . . Comet, Ashe, N. C 
Miller, John B., . New Paris, Bedford, Pa 

Miller, J. H., Goshen, Ind 

Miller, Geo. W., Clifton, N. C 

Miller, Samuel, . . West Alexandria, Ohio 

Miller, A. F Booth, Reno, Kans 

Miller, John E., Mt. Morris, 111 

Miller, W. H., Westphalia, Kans 

Miller, Robert Roann, Ind 

Miller, Wm Stockport, Ind 

Miller, J. W Stockport, Ind 

Miller, D. A Lemars, Iowa 

Miller, S. S., Laplace, Piatt, III 

Miller, J. H Mound City, Mo 

Miller, William, South Bend, Ind 

Miller, Thurston Laporte, Ind 

Miller, D. M., Milledgeville, 111 

Miller, Samuel T., Stonewall. Augusta, Va 
Miller, E. J Olathe, Kans 



Miller, Martin, .... Jalapa, Grant, Ind 
Miller, J. R., . . . Nappanee, Elkhart, Ind 

Miller, Lewis, Grayson, La 

Miller, Alfred, .... Carroll, Clinton, Pa 

Miller, L. E Cando, N. Dak 

Miller, E.S., .... Blackrock, York, Pa 

Miller, S.J. , Lordsburg, Cal 

Miller. S. D Mt. Sidney, Va 

Miller, I. B., Gettysburg, Ohio 

Miller, Andrew, . Eldorado, Preble, Ohio 
Miller, Jonathan, . . . Comet, Ashe, N. C 

Miller, Peter, Jonesboro, Tenn 

Miller, J. M., . . . Eglon, Preston, W. Va 

Miller, D. L., Mt. Morris, 111 

Miller, I. N., . . . Norborne, Carroll, Mo 
Miller, Hiram G., . . . . Bridgewater, Va 
Miller, S. C, . . . . Maxwell, Story, Iowa 
Miller, W. R., 162 Loomis St., Chicago, 111 

Miller, J. Kurtz Kauffman, Pa 

Miller, D. W., .... Robins, Linn, Iowa 
Miller, J. B., . . . Woodbury, Bedford, Pa 

Miller, John A., New Lisbon, Ind 

Millspaugh, H. E., Gilnian, Ind 

Minix, Jos., . . . Lakeside, Cameron, La 
Minnich, Michael, . . Dora, Wabash, Ind 

Mishler, George, Kinzie, Ind 

Mishler, J. G., . . Suffield, Portage, Ohio 

Mishler, M.J Monitor, Kans 

Mitchel, John, . . . Saline City, Clay. Ind 
Moats, John W., . . . Altoona, Polk, Iowa 

Mohler, Jesse, Warrensburg, Mo 

Mohler, John E Warrensburg, Mo 

Mohler, D. L., Leeton, Mo 

Mohler, Wm., Falls City, Nebr 

Mohler, Harvey H., Latour, Mo 

Mohler, J. S., Meriden, Kans 

Mohler, John M., Lewistown, Pa 

Mohler, D. M., . . . . Warrensburg, Mo 

Mohler, M. S., Leeton, Mo 

Mohler, Levi, Warrensburg, Mo 

Mohler, Levi S., . . . Dillsburg, York, Pa 
Mohler, George, . . . Boyd, Darke, Ohio 
Mohler, J. M., . . . Leeton, Johnson, Mo 
Mohler, Daniel, . . . Hammond, Piatt, 111 

Moherman, Tully S Ashland, Ohio 

Molsbee, Abraham .... Nocona, Texas 
Molsbee, J. O., . . . . Gillenwater, Tenn 
Montgomery, Benjamin, . Eaglerock, Va 
Montgomery, Charles S., . . . Helms, Va 
Montgomery, Abraham S.. . . Helms, Va 
Montgomery, Riley, . Flora, Carroll, Ind 
Moomaw, P., Eaglepoint, Jackson, Oregon 
Moomaw, B. F., . Bonsacks, Roanoke, Va 
Moomaw, Kenton B., . . . Indianrock, Va 
Moomaw, Amos, .... Wilsonton, Kans 

Moore, P. A., Inglewood, Cal 

Moore, Wm. K., . . Nora, Jo Daviess, 111 
Moore, J. H.,. . . . Mt. Morris, Ogle, 111 

Moore, C.W., Sandbrook, N.J 

Moore, J. B., Octavia, Nebr 

Morris, Richard, . . Triplet, Carroll, Mo 
Mortin, Silas, . . . Corning, Adams, Iowa 
Moss, Aaron, .... Landess, Grant, Ind 

Moss, Owen C Duffy, W. Va 

Mote, Harvey, .... Vine, Darke. Ohio 

Mow, A. I., Argos, Ind 

Mowry, Hugh R., .... Saumesville, Va 
Moyer, H., . Dovesville, Rockingham, Va 
Mummert, Moses, . . . Menges Mills, Pa 
Munson, A. A., . . Lagrange. Cass, Mich 
Muntis, Samuel Mt. Vernon, Ohio 



44 



BretJircns Family Almanac. 



t 

Peterson, E Hollow Poplar, N. C 

Peterson, Solomon, Relief, N. C 

Peterson, John H Relief, N. C 

Peterson, T. C, . . . . Herington, Kans 
Retry. Benj. F., . . . Gratis, Preble, Ohio 

Retry, Samuel, Goods Mills, Va 

Retry, Luther, . 95 Means St., Atlanta, Ga 

Retry, Stephen Glenkarn. Ohio 

Rfautz, J. K., Farmersville, Lancaster, Pa 
Pfoutz, Abraham, . . . Crosskill Mills. Pa 
Rfoutz, C. L., . . . . Knoxlyn, Adams, Pa 

Phillippi, Wm. R., Hope. Kans 

Phillips, Wm. B Texas, W. Va 

Phillips, Geo. A., Hermitage, Va 

Pittinger, John M., . . . Covington, Ohio 
Rittenger, John, . Spencer. Medina, Ohio 
Rittman, Henry E., . Loraine, Adams, 111 

Plauger, A. J Hoaglin, Ohio 

Poling, Godfrey J Kasson, W. Va 

Pollock, Alvin, Cropsie, 111 

Pollard, R. T Garrett. Somerset, Pa 

Pope, J. W., . . Moorefield, Hardy, W. Va 
Ropejoy, Vvm. A., . . Roneto, Wells, Ind 
Porter, Powell B„ . . Esbon, Jewell, Kans 
Pottinger, Leander, .... Ciaypool. Ind 
Rowel, E. M., . . Chestnut, Amherst, Va 

Rrather, M., Creston, Ashe, N. C 

Prather, H. M Creston, Ashe, N. C 

Rrather. Enoch, . Hemet, Riverside, Cal 
Price, Isaac, . . Rleasanthill. Miami, Ohio 
Price, David E., . . Mt. Morris, Ogle, 111 

Price, J. M., Harleysville. Pa 

Price, J. H., . . Richlandtown, Bucks, Pa 
Price, M. V., .... Harrison. Boone, Ark 

Price, Henry A Harleysville, Pa 

Price, E. W Nickerson, Kans 

Price, C. C Polo, 111 

Price, Joseph, . . . Lineboro, Carroll, Md 

Pricket, L. E Pioneer, Barry, Mo 

Rringle, Joseph, Edenton, Clermont, Ohio 

Prough, Daniel, York, N. Dak 

Prowant, Daniel, . Dupont, Putnam, Ohio 
Prowant, John, . . Dupont, Putnam, Ohio 
Rullen, Wm. H., Rarkcrford, Chester, Pa 
Puffenbarger, Amos, . Sugargrove, W. Va 
Rursley, A. F., . . . Maple, Botetourt, Va 

Pursley, Wm. T Saltpeter Cave, Va 

Puterbaugh, D. B., . . . . Mt. Morris, 111 

Puterbaugh, A. H., Elkhart, Ind 

Puterbaugh, A., Ozawkie. Jefferson, Kans 
Puterbaugh. J. P., . . . Nickerson, Kans 
Pylc, W. H., . . . Hansen, Franklin, Iowa 
Rysell, Jacob, . . . McHenry, Garrett, Md 
Quinn, Wm. H., 117 4th St., Canton, Ohio 

Racer, John A. Kimball, Va 

Raffcnsberger, Levi, . Franklin Grove, 111 
Rairigh, Isaiah, . Woodland, Barry, Mich 
Rairigh, Isaac, . . Campbell, Ionia, Mich 

Rairigh, Geo. S., Denton, Md 

Rarick, Jacob, . Royerton, Delaware, Ind 
Rambow, George, . . Douds Station, Iowa 

Ream, James F., Gcistown, Pa 

Reber, Jonathan G.,Centerport, Berks. Pa 

Recce, Enos J., Grangeville, Mo 

Redmon, S. S., • • Nocona, Tex 

Reed, A. J., . Scottsville, Alleghany, N. C 
Reed, Samuel, . • Progress, Dauphin, Pa 

Reed, Isaac Alumridge, Floyd, Va 

Reed, Albert P., Elmville, Highland, Ohio 
Reed, Henry, . . . Alumridge, Floyd, Va 
Reed, Ross E Morgantown, W. Va 



Murray, Samuel, .... Huntington, Ind 

Murray, Jacob Lacy, Okla 

Murray, J. C, Nappanee, Ind 

Murray, Wm. A., . . Polk, Ashland. Ohio 
Murray, Jacob A.. . ... . . . Pate, Tenn 

Murray, Fred., . . Champion, Fayette, Pa 
Murray, John, . . . . Bean Station, Tenn 

Murray, James, Smithville, Ohio 

Murphy, Wm.R., . . Eby, Taylor, W. Va 
Murphy, Geo. E., . . Eby, Taylor, W. Va 
Musselmau, Hiram, . . . Scalp Level, Pa 
Musser, Samuel, . McVeytown, Mifflin, Pa 

Myer, John W Lancaster, Pa 

Myers, J. Allen, . McVeytown, Mifflin, Pa 

Myers, S. B., Graydon, York, Pa 

Myers, Wm., . . . Bourbon, Marshall, Ind 

Myers, R. T., McVeytown, Pa 

Myers, Jacob L., . . Coleta, Whiteside, 111 

Myers, J. W Fredericksburg, Pa 

Myers, John, . . Williamson, Franklin, Pa 
Myers, S. L., . . . Webber, JewelJ, Kans 
Myers, C, E., . Tarrs, Westmoreland, Pa 
Myers, H. S., . . . Pennsville, Fayette, Pa 
Myers, Isaac, . . Fandon, McDonough, 111 

Myers, Ananias, Johnstown, Pa 

Myers, David R., . . New Cambria, Kans 
Myers, Jacob M., . . . Graydon, York, Pa 
Myers, John, . . . Lincoln, Lancaster, Pa 

Myers, Isaac C, Greenmount, Va 

Myers, T. T., 

2414 N. 17th St., Philadelphia, Pa 
Myers, Abram, . . Mattawana, Mifflin, Pa 
Myers, Andrew, . . . Loganville, York, Pa 

Myers, Christian Mt. Union, Pa 

Myers, George, . . . Wade, Miami, Kans 

Myers Michael 

.... 701 Devoe St., Creston, Iowa 
Myers, Franklin, . Mt. Carroll, Carroll, 111 
Myers, George S., . . New Enterprise, Pa 

Myers, George W., Laconia, Ind 

Myers, Joseph L., . Harlan, Shelby, Iowa 

Myers, S. F Altoona, Blair, Pa 

Myers, Samuel, . Rerrysburg, Miami, Ind 

Myers, Joseph, Mt. Pleasant, Pa 

Myers, S. H., Timberville, Va 

Myers, Tobias, . . Sheldon, O'Brien, Iowa 
Myers, John, . Millstone, Washington, Md 

Myers, P. S 

looi Main St., East Los Angeles, Cal 

Myler, J. W., Battlecreek. Iowa 

Naff, CD., Salem, Va 

Naff, Benjamin T., .... Hernando, Va 

Naff, Daniel, Naffs, Franklin, Va 

Naff, W. H Little River, Floyd, Va 

Naff, John Salem, Roanoke, Va 

Nead, M., Leesburg, Tenn 

Nead, Daniel P., . . . . Nead, Miami, Ind 

Neal, Wm. F Packerton, Ind 

Neff, B. W., Mt. Jackson, Va 

Neff, A. L., . 621 New M. St., Goshen, Ind 

Neff, W. B Milford, Ind 

Neff, David, .... Roann, Wabash, Ind 
Neff, Benjamin, . North Manchester, Ind 
Neff, Daniel, . . New Paris, Elkhart, Ind 

Neff, James M Fruitdale, Ala 

Neff, James Milford, Ind 

Neff, Henry Roann, Ind 

Neff, Henry, New Paris, Ind 

Neher.J. C Stroud, Okla 

Neher, J.F Saginaw, Texas 

I^eher, Amos A., . Mulberry, Clinton, Ind 



Neher, Samuel, . . Petroleum, Wells, Ind 
Neher, Andrew, McCune, Crawford, Kans 

Neher, Martin, McCune, Kans 

Neher, E. J Hollywood, Ala 

Neher, J. H. McCune, Kans 

Neher, Ananias Clarkson, Okla 

Neher, John F., Lordsburg, Cal 

Neibert, F. J., Broadfording, Md 

Nelson, N. P., . Reece, Greenwood, Kans 

Nelson, N. B Juniata, Nebr 

Ness, Christian, . . . Graydon, York, Pa 
Nevinger, Granville, . . Beecher City, 111 
Newcomer, Melchor S., . . Mt. Morris, 111 

Newcomer, J. S., Mountville, Pa 

Newcomer, E., Mt. Morris, 111 

Newcomer, Samuel 1., . . . . Lanark, 111 
Niccum, David H., . . Carrington, N. Dak 

Nickey, Amos J Oakley, Macon, 111 

Nicodemus, Albert, .... Kingsley, Iowa 
Nicola, C. G., . Nicklow, Barbour, W. Va 
Nine, W. F., . . Gormania, Grant, W. Va 
Nininger, C. E., . . . . Ashland, Oregon 
Nissly, Jacob, . . Richland, Lebanon, Pa 

Noffsinger, Ezra Union City, Ind 

Nofziger, J. P., . . . Mascot, Harlan, Nebr 

Norcross, D. A Glendora, Cal 

Numer, J.H Ft. Scott, Kans. 

Nusbaum, John, . Wakarusa, Elkhart, Ind 

Oaks, Lewis Portland, Ind 

Oberholtzer, Wm. H., . . Myerstown, Pa 

Oberlin, Allen A Norfolk, Va 

Oblinger, Samuel, . . . Waterville, Minn 

Ockerman, J. E Attica, Ohio 

Ockerman, A., Highland, Ohio 

Oellig, C. R., Waynesboro, Pa 

Ogden, Orlando, .... Unionville, Iowa 

Ogle. Alfred. Peabody, Kans 

Oliver, David H Trotwood, Ohio 

Olsen, John Devils Lake, N. Dak 

Oren, A. W., Lankford, Tenn 

Orr, Samuel, . Brownsville. Licking, Ohio 

Otto, John E., Sharpsburg, Md 

Overfelt. Samuel Gravelpoint, Mo 

Overholtzer, Derius, Covina. Cal 

Overholt, Jonas, . . . Dutton, Kent. Mich 
Owens, Martin G., . Transon, Ashe, N. C 
Painter, G. W., . . Springport, Henry, Ind 

Palmer, Harrison, Esbon, Kans 

Parker, I. D., . Elkhart, Ind 

Partch, A. H., Mound City, Mo 

Patten, Thomas, Ash Ridge, Wis 

Patten, John, Ash Ridge, Wis 

Patterson, George, . . . Berwinsdale, Pa 

Payton, S. W., Connersville, Ind 

Rearsoll, A. L Dunlap, Kans 

Peck, Francis M., . . Catalpa, Gove, Kans 
Peck, J. W., . . Meyersdale, Somerset, Pa 
Peck, LeVvis, .... Savage, Somerset, Pa 

Peck, Jacob C, Falls City, Nebr 

Peifer, L. R., . 1102 S. St., Waterloo, Iowa 

Pence, J. B Limestone, Tenn 

Pence, George F., . . . Limestone, Tenn 

Perry, Jasper N., Sawyer. Kans 

Peters, Morton, Manvel, Texas 

Peters, Amos Cando, N. Dak 

Peters, Owen, . . Holmesville, Gage, Nebr 
Peters, Daniel, . . . Helms, Franklin, Va 
Peters, Riley L., . . Helms, Franklin, Va 

Peters, Jesse, Cando, N. Dak 

Peters, Wm Seven Fountains, Va 

Peterson, Mariiius, . . . Lablanche, Kans 



Brethren^ Family Almanac. 



4$ 



Reed, Peter D., Limestone, Tenn 

Reed, Noah, .... Alumridge, Floyd, Va 
Reed, Samuel P., . Alumridge, Floyd, Va 
Reed, Wyatt, . . . Alumridge, Floyd, Va 

Reed, Wm. A Scottville, N. C 

Reese, J. W., . . Jerry City, Wood, Ohio 

Reeves, Alfred H Dickens, Iowa 

Reichard, W. Scott, . . Hagerstown, Md 
Reidenbach, R., Hinkleton, Lancaster, Pa 

Reiff, J.C, Huntingdon, Pa 

Reiman, S. F., . . . Berlin, Somerset, Pa 

Renner, Eli Burr Oak, Kans 

Renner, F. C, New Midway, Md 

Rensberger, Melvin, .... Goshen, Ind 
Replogle, Martin, .... Unionville, Iowa 
Replogle, J. B., . Woodbury, Bedford, Pa 
Replogle, David, Rogersville, Henry, Ind 

Replogle, H. S Waterside, Pa 

Replogle, J. C, Buchanan, Mich 

Reynolds, W. W., . Rogers, Benton, Ark 
Rhodes, D. B., . . Rockingham, Ray, Mo 
Richard, Wolford, . . . Waterville, Minn 
Richard, D. R., . Fortville, Hancock, Ind 
Richard, A., Woodstock, Shenandoah, Va 

Richard, Jacob H., Maitland, Pa 

Richardson, J., . . . Meadowbluff, W. Va 

Richardson, Scott, Millgrove, Ind 

Ritchey, Wm., . . Foreman, Bedford, Pa 
Riddlesberger, Isaac, Quincy, Franklin, Pa 
Ridenour, John, . Garrison, Benton, Iowa 

Rife, Jacob, Boston, Wayne, Ind 

Rife, Joseph D., . . Converse, Miami, Ind 

Riggle, Daniel, Goshen, Ind 

Riggleman, John, . . . Bluespring, W. Va 
Rinehart, Abram, . . . Onward, Cass, Ind 

Riner, Samuel Oakhill,'W. Va 

Rinker, Nicholas, . Dobbin, Grant, W. Va 
Ritchey, Samuel, .... Yellowcreek, Pa 
Rittenhouse, E. M., . . . Primrose, Ohio 
Ritzins, Henry, Leiters Ford, Fulton, Ind 
Ritzins, Noah, Leiters Ford, Fulton, Ind 
Robinson, J. F., . . Salem. Forsyth, N. C 

Robinson, T. A., Jasper, Mo 

Robeson, Jesse J., . . . Lonaconing, Md 

Robison, Joseph, Carey, Ohio 

Rodebaugh, A., . . Collins, St. Clair, Mo 
Rodabaugh, Willis, Fredric, Monroe, Iowa 
Rodabaugh, E. G., . . Birmingham, Iowa- 
Rodecker, Thomas, Mendon, Mercer, Ohio 
Rodgers, Levi, .... Ryot, Bedford, Pa 
Rodgers, John C, . . . Hartford City, Ind 

Roller, M. G., New Market, Va 

Rose. W. A., Booth, Reno, Kans 

Rolston, J. E Sheldon, Iowa 

Roose, Eli, Buchanan, Mich 

Roose, Hiram, . Wakarusa, Elkhart, Ind 
Roop, Israel, .... Attica, Seneca, Ohio 
Roop, Joel, . . New Windsor, Carroll, Md 

Roop, Jesse, New Windsor, Md 

Roop, Wm. E., Westminster, Carroll, Md 
Root, C. C, . . Ozawkie, Jefferson, Kans 
Root, Willis E., Bijou Hills, Brule, S. Dak 
Root, Andrew, .... Centropolis, Kans 
Root, John A., . Ozawkie, Jefferson, Kans 

Root, Joseph A,, Avilla, Mo 

Ross, Henry, Ottawa, Kans 

Rosenberger, I. J., . . . Covington, Ohio 

Rosenberger, A. S C&vington, Ohio 

Rosenberger. E. H., . . McComb, Ohio 
Rothenberger, Daniel, North Webster, Ind 
Rothgeb, Martin Massanutton, Va 



Rothrock, E. S., . Carlisle, Fillmore, Nebr 

Rotruck, W. D., Antioch, W. Va 

Rowe, Chas., Grimes, Polk, Iowa 

Rowland, Abraham, . . Hagerstown, Md 

Rowland, John Reid, Md 

Rowland, David, . . . Lanark, Carroll, 111 
Rowland, C. P., . . . Lanark, Carroll, 111 
Royer, J. G., . . . . Mt. Morris, Ogle, 111 
Royer, Galen B., . . Mt. Morris, Ogle, 111 

Royer, Henry D., Lincoln, Pa 

Royer, S. D Bradford, Ohio 

Royer, Josiah A., . Isabel, Lane, Oregon 

Royer, Jesse E., Holliday, Mo 

Rufner, George, . . Fairfield Center, Ind 
Ruff, Edward, . . . Argos, Marshall, Ind 
Rupert, S. G., . . . Lewi^town, Mifflin, Pa 
Rupel, Andrew, . . . North Liberty, Ind 
Rush, John S., . . Tatesville, Bedford, Pa 

Rust, Raburn S., Valley City, Mo 

Ruthrauff, John B., . . . Waynesboro, Pa 

Ryan, J. S., Alvo, Cass, Nebr 

Ry lan, John L Saumsville, Va 

Sadler, J. Kidder, Caldwell, Mo 

Sad'-r, J. W., . Limespring, Howard, Iowa 

Send rs,A.W Perry, Okla 

Sandy, Jacob D Donnellsville, Ohio 

Sanger. S. F Calverton, Va 

Sanger, S, A Scottsford, Va 

Sanger, Anthony, . Keota, Keokuk, Iowa 

Sanger, Martin G Sangerville, Va 

Sappington, Geo. K., . . . Johnsville, Md 
Sayler, Levi, . . . Quarry, Marshall, Iowa 
Saylor, D. R., . . . Mechanicstown, Md 
Satterheld. B. F., . . . . Mayton, W. Va 
Satterfield, John, .... Yellow Pine, Ala 

Sawyer, W. H. H., Morrill, Kans 

Schickle. Joseph, Thaxtons, Va 

Schlosser, John, Schoeneck, Lancaster, Pa 
Schrock, J. Plarvey, . . . Middlebury, Ind 

Schwalm, H. M., Wakarusa, Ind 

Schmidt, John, . Strawberry Point, Iowa 
Schultz, Joshua, . Ellwood, Clinton, Iowa 
Seas, Oliver, . . . Nashville, Barry, Mich 

Secrist, Jacob S., Eugene, Ind 

Secrist, Caleb, . . . Cordova, Talbot, Md 

Seibert,J. C, Cando, N. Dak 

Sieber, Solomon, . . Thompsontown, Pa 

Sell, Arthur, Grenola, Kans 

Sell, James A., .... McKees, Blair, Pa 

Sell, Brice, Newry, Blair, Pa 

Sell, David, Newry, Blair, Pa 

Sell, Joseph B., . . Cameron, Clinton, Mo 
Sell, Daniel D., . Plattsburg, Clinton, Mo 
Sell, Wm. B., ..... . Fredonia, Kans 

Sell, Albert K., . . .' . . Batchelder, Okla 

Sellers, G. W., Bryan, Ohio 

Sellers, John, . . Bourbon, Marshall, Ind 
Senger, D. B., . . Franklin Grove, Lee, 111 
Sergeon, Stephen, . . Jonesville, Lee, Va 
Setty, Sanford, . . . Sinking Spring, Ohio 
Shahan, George, . . Hannahville, W. Va 
Shafer, Wm. H., . Valley Furnace, W. Va 

Shaffer, Levi Beatrice, Gage, Nebr 

Shaffer, Daniel D Scalp Level, Pa 

Shaffer, Joseph, Hooversville, Pa 

Shamberger, Jesse, . Sheridan, Worth, Mo 

Shamberger, Geo. A., 

1606 E. Lyon St., Des Moines, Iowa 
Shank, Emmanuel, West Alexandria, Ohio 

Shank, C. A., Donegal, Kans 

Shank, Daniel Russel, Kans 



Shank, J. B Kidder, Mo 

Sharp, S. Z Plattsburg. Mo 

Sharp, B. F Cosmos, Ohio 

Sharp, Geo. H., Atwood, Kans 

Shatto, A., Abilene, Kans 

Shaver, S. A Maurertown, Va 

Shaver, Isaac, . . . Copperhill, Floyd, Va 
Sheets, E. M., . . . . Lansing, Ashe, N. C 
Sheets, Adam, . . . Lansing, Ashe, N. C 

Sheets, Henry Chfton, N. C 

Sheets, Andrew, . . Gray, Alleghany, N.C 
Sheets, Jesse, .... Lansing, Ashe, N. C 
Shellaberger, John, .... Rockford, Ohio 
Shellenberger, S. H., . . . Biddick, Iowa 
Shellenberger, J. B., . . . Bannerville, Pa 
Shepherd, John, .... Ashe Ridge, Wis 

Shepler, Isaac, Bunkerhill. Ind 

Sherfy, N. B., Blountville, Sullivan, Tenu 
Sherfy, John, . . . Michigan Valley, Kans 

Sherfy W. A Morningstar, Tenn 

Sherrick, M. M., . . . Lake Odessa, Mich 
Shick, Urias, . . Holmesville, Gage, Nebr 

Shick, J.N., Lowden, Iowa 

Shickel, Jos., . . . Roanoke, Roanoke, Va 

Shideler, Daniel, Majenica, Ind 

Shideler, Henry Monmouth, Kans 

Shirk, Jacob B., Ramona, Kans 

Shirky, Samuel B., Rockingham, Ray, Mo 
Shirkey, John H., . Rockingham, Ray, Mo 
Shively, G. B., . . Nappanee, Elkhart, Ind 

Shively, John W Bourbon, Ind 

Shively, David, .... Etna Green, Ind 
Shively, Joel. . . Osceola, St. Joseph, Ind 
Shively, Jacob B., Burroak, Marshall, Ind 

Shively, John Flora, Carroll, Ind 

Shively, Aaron, Bayard, Columbiana, Ohio 

Shively, Daniel, Goshen, Ind 

Shively, Daniel P Nead, Miami, Ind 

Shively, G. W., . . Kossuth, Clarion, Pa 

Shively, John K., Avilla, Mo 

Shively, Green, .... Whitesprings, Pa 
Shock, Warren D., . . . Huntington, Ind 
Sholty, B. F., . . Pioneer, Williams, Ohio 
Shong, David, . Sherwood, Defiance, Ohio 

Shope, Adam J., Harrisburg, Pa 

Shope, David F., Saltillo, Huntingdon, Pa 
Shoop, S. B., Mapleville, Washington, Md 
Shotts, M. C. .... Flint, Steuben, Ind 

Showalter, Simon, Richfield, Pa 

Showalter, P. H., Meyerhoeffers Store, Va 
Shower, R. B., . . Aurora, Madison, Ark 
Shrock, W. G., . . . Berlin, Somerset, Pa 

Shrock, Eli Lagrange, Ind 

Shrock, C, . . Middlebury, Elkhart. Ind 
Shroyer, Reuben, . . Pierce, Stark, Ohio 
Shroyer, Daniel, , . . Carroll, Clinton. Pa 

Shuck, J. F., Ft. Collins, Colo 

Shuck, S. A Ashland, Oregon 

Shultz, John F., Chenoa, 111 

Shutt, H. M., . . Baltic, Tuscarawas, Ohio 
Shutt, N. H., . . Brighton, Lagrange, Ind 
Shreve, R. J., . . Waterford, Laporte, Ind 
Simmons, Thos. J., Osceola, St. Clair. Mo 
Simmons, Wm. K., . . . Union City, Ind 

Simpson, O. P Mt. Etna, Iowa 

Sines, W. T., . . . Oakland, Garrett, Md 
Sines, Emmanuel, .... Canaan, W. Va 

Sink, David Mt. Etna, Iowa 

Sissler, M., . Dallas Center. Dallas, Iowa 

Sizemore, Jos. I., War Gap, Tenn 

Slifer, C. H., Bird City, Kans 



46 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



Slingluff, Jolin U Sidney, Nebr 

Sloatman, Samuel, Missouri Valley, Iowa 

Sloniker, Jacob, Palestine, Ark 

Srneltzer, Elias, . Arcadia, Hamilton, Ind 

Smeltzer, Moses Noblesville, Ind 

Smith, L. S., 

1548 Pacific Ave., Atchison, Kans 
Smith, John, . Woodbury, Baltimore, Md 
Smith, John, Trotwood, Montgomery , Ohio 

Smith, Wm., Hoyle, Okla 

Smith, S. M., . . . Campbell, Ionia, Mich 

Smith, John I Wray, Yuma, Colo 

Smith, Harry C, Kong, Kans 

Smith, J. M., . . Woodland, Barry, Mich 
Smith, W.S., .... Edens Ridge, Tenn 
Smith, H. J., Herington, Dickinson, Kans 

Smith, David, Union Deposit, Pa 

Smith, Adam R., Rokeby, Lancaster, Nebr 
Smith, Daniel, . . Cuba, Republic, Kans 
Smith, Benj,, .... Barnes Mills, W. Va 

Smith, C. B., Beatrice, Nebr 

Smith, T.M., Wolf Glade, Va 

Smith, Emmanuel J., Lynn, Okla 

Snavely, Ira C, . . . . McPherson, Kans 
Snavely, John L., .... Alvo, Cass, Nebr 

Snell, Samuel, Center, Ohio 

Snell, Jacob S., . . Collamer, Whitley, Ind 
Snell, Daniel, . . Sidney, Kosciusko, Ind 

Snider, G. A., Harrod, Ohio 

Snider, Jacob Waynesboro, Pa 

Snively, J. S., Lanark, 111 

Snoeberger, A. L., . . . . Plattsburg, Mo 
Snowberger, Joseph, . . Williamsburg, Pa 
Snowberger, A. C, . . . Longmont, Colo 
Snowberger, Isaac N., Flint, Steuben, Ind 
Snader, David, . . Akron, Lancaster, Pa 

Snyder, David, Ashland, Ohio 

Snyder, J. M., McPherson, Kans 

Snyder, T. G., .... Robins, Linn, Iowa 

Snyder, J. S., Brooklyn, Iowa 

Snyder, L. S Missouri Valley, Iowa 

Solenberger, Jacob Naperville, 111 

Sollenberger, Aaron D., . . Pickrell, Nebr 
Sollenberger, David P., . . Fidelity, Ohio 
Sonefrank, George, . . McGrawsville, Ind 
Sonon, Henry S., . . East Petersburg, Pa 

Sours, H. F., Long, Va 

Spacht, J. R., . New Stark, Hancock, Ohio 
Spanogle, Andrew, .... Lewistown, Pa 

Spanogle, H. A., Lewistown, Pa 

Spangler, S. G., . Floyd C. H., Floyd, Va 
Spangler, John, . . Huffville, Floyd, Va 
Speicher, Jacob, . . . Bills, Somerset, Pa 
Spicher, John W., . Hillsdale, Indiana, Pa 
Spicher, J., . Waterloo. Blackhawk, Iowa 

Spicher, M.H., Ord, Pa 

Spitler, Samuel Long, Va 

Sprang, Godfry, . . . White Pigeon, Mich 
Sprankel, Samuel, Massillon, Stark, Ohio 
Spitzer, Joseph F., . . . Summitville, Ind 

Spitzer, G. C, Bridgewater, Va 

Sprague, Byron, .... Lablanche, Kans 

Stahl^H.A., Glade, Pa 

Stafford, John, . Spencerville, Dekalb, Ind 

Stair, M. E., Polo. Mo 

Stayer, David, Tatesviile, Pa 

Stayer, J. C, . . Woodbury, Bedford, Pa 

Stayer, J. R Roaring Spring, Pa 

Stayer, John S., . . . Roaring Spring, Pa 
Stambaugh, G. W., McCool Junction, Nebr 
Stamy, J.F Lees Crossroads, Pa 



Starkey,J. H., . . . Griffithsville, W. Va 
Steckley, Henry, . . Garrett, Dekalb, Ind 
Stees, Israel, .... Lena, Stephenson, 111 
Steinberger, Albert, . . . Lewistown, Pa 
Steffen, Conrad, . . . Newark, Lewis, Mo 
Stephens, Rezin, West Manchester, Ohio 
Stevens, S. M., .... Cabool, Texas, Mo 

Stickler, Wo E., Centerville. Iowa 

Stieneke, F. S., Aurelia, Iowa 

Stitzel, Joseph, .... Lanark, Carroll, 111 
Stiverson, J. U. G., . . Oysterville, Wash 
Stockmyer, Wm., Harding, Bourbon, Kans 
Stone, G. E. . . . North Manchester, Ind 
Stone, C. H., . . Edgewood, Clayton, Iowa 
Stone, Henry, . Edgewood, Clayton, Iowa 

Stoneburner, Levi, Warsaw, Ind 

Stoneburner, Jesse W., . . Peterson, Ind 
Stoner, David, . Johnsville, Frederick, Md 
Stoner, J.C., . Hutsonville, Crawford, 111 
Stoner, D. W., . . Vesper, Lincoln, Kans 

Stoner, Levi, Mammoth, Pa 

Stoner, Solomon, Uniontown, Carroll, Md 
Stoner, E. W., Union Bridge, Carroll, Md 

Stoner, Samuel D., Ladoga, Ind 

Stookey, Sherman, Fandon, 111. 

Stong, G. W., Cando, N. Dak 

Stouffer, M Mansfield, Piatt, 111 

StoufTer, E. H., . Garrison, Benton, Iowa 
Stouffer, Ephraim, . . New Windsor, Md 

Stouffer, Albert Fredonia, Kans 

Stouffer, D.F., Benevola, Md 

Stouffer, S. M., Greenspring, Pa 

Stouder, David W., .... Madison, Kans 
Stouder, Jas. A., .... Davenport, Okla 
Stout, John, . . Millwood, Kosciusko, Jnd 

Stout, W.J Leon, Decatur, Iowa 

Stover, D. E., Hawthorn, Fla 

Strausburg, John, . . . Jalapa, Grant, Ind 
Strickler, Baptist H., Loraine, Adams, 111 

Strickler, H. W Loraine, Adams, 111 

Strickler, Henry P., Grundy Center, Iowa 

Strickler, D. H., Vicksburg, Pa 

Strickler, Walter, Luray, Va 

Strickler, Ellis Ramona, Kans 

Stroup, Eli, Homeworth, Columbiana, Ohio 

Strycker, Geo., Mayville, N. Dak 

Stuckey, Simon B., .. . Paris, Stark, Ohio 
Stuckey, Levi, .... New Enterprise, Pa 
Stuckman, P., . . Nappanee, Elkhart, Ind 
Studebaker, Joseph, E., McPherson, Kans 
Studebaker, Simon E., Summerfield, Kans 
Studebaker, George E,, McPherson, Kans 
Studebaker, Jesse, .... Mont Ida, Kans 
Studebaker, Samuel, .... Pearl City, 111 
Studebaker, G. W., . . . Fredonia, Kans 
Studebaker, Isaac S., . . . Casstown, Ohio 

Studebaker, J. U., Shideler, Ind 

Studebaker, Geo. L., . . . . Shideler, Ind 

Stump, Solomon Waynesville, Mo 

Stump, George C, . . Baker, Darke, Ohio 

Stump, John Miami, Texas 

Sturgis, John , Perrin, Mo 

Stutsman, Jesse, . Pitsburg, Darke, Ohio 
Stutsman, J. R., . . Harbor Springs, Mich 

Stutsman, B. F., Goshen, Ind 

Stutsman, D.C 

1018 North Miami St., Dayton, Ohio 
Summy. Abraham, .... Kecksburg, Pa 
Sunderland, Henry, Carthage, Jasper, Mo 

Suter, CM Ashton, Lee, 111 

Sutter, A. A., Roanoke, La 



— t. 

Sutter, P. J., ....... Laurens, Iowa 

Swab, John, Valley, Clarion, Pa 

Swigart, S. J., . . . Lewistown, Mifflin, Pa 

Swigart, W. J.. Huntingdon, Pa 

Swigart, M. C, McVeytown,Va 

Swigart, G. H., McVeytown, Pa 

Swigart, J. C, . Strodes Mills, Mifflin, Pa 
Swihart, David, . . Roann, Wabash, Ind 
Swihart, Aaron. . . . Argos, Marshall, Ind 

Swihart, Geo., Mayville, N. Dak 

Swihart, Jacob Churubusco, Ind 

Swihart, Neri Bigfoot, Fulton, Ind 

Swihart, Geo Roann, Ind 

Swihart, George T Goshen, Ind 

Swihart, Walter, Glendale, Ariz 

Swinger, Jacob, Hutsonville, Crawford, 111 
Swonger, Michael, . . . Logansville, Ohio 
Talhehii, Humphrey, . Washington, Kans 

Taylor, S. C. Whitesville, Mo 

Taylor, Allen, Brownstown, 111 

Taylor, H. R Deep River, Iowa 

Taylor, L W Vogansville, Pa 

Teats, L. W., . Lost River, Hardy, W^ Va 
Teeter, Lewis W., . Hagerstown, Indiana 
Teeter, W. C, 17 Horace St., Dayton, Ohio 
Teeter, D. W., .... Jasper, Jasper, Mo 
Teeter, Lewis L., Rogersville, Henry, Ind 
Tennison, K. G., . . Weatherford, Texas 

Thomas, Isaac Compton, Cal 

Thomas, D. D., . . . WiUiamstown, Ohio 

Thomas, Michael, Somerfield, Pa 

Thomas, David, Bangor, Van Buren, Mich 

Thomas, J. L., Cando, N. Dak 

Thomas, G. W., . . . . Nez Perces, Idaho 

Thomas, Jacob, Springcreek, Va 

Thomas, Wm. J., Inglewood, Cal 

Thomas, Wm., .... Gibbons Glade, Pa 
Thomas, S. B., . . Carey, Wyandot, Ohio 
Thomas, Jeremiah, . Clifton Mills, W\ Va 
Thomas, Abram, .... Springcreek, Va 

Thomas, P. S., Harrisonburg, Va 

Thomas, J. A., . Fred, Kans 

Thompson, Samuel, .... Sycamore, Ind 

Thompson, L O., Kearney, Md 

Thompson, Stephen, . . . Fredonia, Kans 

Throne, G. M,, Norton, Kans 

Tilsman, A. L., Lindside, Monroe, W. Va 

Titler, Geo Dupont, Putnam, Oliio 

Titus, Albert, . . Carlisle, Fillmore, Nebr 

Tingley, H., Jerico, Cedar, Mo 

Tombaugh, Jacob Rodney, Mich 

Toney, Carey, . Connersville, Fayette, Ind 
Toney, W. S., . . . . Walton, Cass, Ind 

Tow, William, Cana, Va 

Towns, Harmon, Woodland Center, Mich 
Trapp, Nicholas, Altamont, Labette, Kans 
Trimmer, Peter, . . . Mulberry, York, Pa 
Trostle, J. D., . . Hope, Dickinson, Kans 

Trostle, J.W Compton. Cal 

Trostle. W. E Stratford, 111 

Trostle, Eph Mt. Morris, 111 

Trostle, John Gettysburg, Pa 

Trostle, Levi Franklin Grove, 111 

Troup, Henry H Maxwell, Iowa 

Trout, I. Bennett Lanark, 111 

Troxel, J.J., Mountaingrove, Mo 

Troxel. Jacob, . . Conway Springs, Kans 
Troxel, Davifl, . . . Cerrogordo, Piatt, 111 

Troxel. Henry, Burnett, Okla 

Tucker, John, . Hagers Grove, Shelby, Mo 
Turner, John H Darksville, W. Va 



Brethren' a luimily Almanac. 



47 



_ J 

Turner, Daniel, Cootes Store, Va 

Tyson, George, . . West Millgrove, Ohio 
Tyson, Abram S., Mansfield, Wright, Mo 
Ulery, J. Edson, .... Middlebury, Ind 
Ulery, Gabriel, . . North Manchester, Ind 
Ulery, S. Stephen, North Manchester, Ind 

UUery, Daniel Divide, 111 

UUery, John, . . . Fyrmont, Carroll, Ind 

UUery, Jacob, Grenola, Kans 

Ullery, Jacob, Laplace, Piatt, 111 

UUom, Homer, . . . Friend, Scott, Kans 
Ulrich, Frederick, .... Fredonia, Kans 

Umbel, Samuel Markleysburg, Fa 

Urey, S. C Glendora, Cal 

Utz, S. H., . New Market, Frederick, Md 
Utz, John H., . Union Bridge, Carroll, Md 
Utz.J. H.. ..... Martinsburg, W. Va 

VanBuren, T. D., Edson, Wis 

VanDyke, A., . 24 Bell St., Beatrice, Nebr 
VanDyke, S. P., . Norway, Coos, Oregon 

VanDyke, G. H 

... 183 W. 13th Place, Chicago, 111 

Vanhorn, Daniel M Foreman, Pa 

Vaniman, Daniel, . . . McPherson, Kans 
Vaniman, A. W., . . . Moundridge, Kans 
Varner, Wm., . . . Doehill, Highland, Va 
Vines, Andrew J., . . . . Jonesboro, Tenn 
Wageman, Jonathan G., . Tyner City, Ind 

Wagner, D. T., Beecher City, 111 

Wagoner, Noah B., . . . Redcloud, Nebr 
Wakefield, R. W., . . . Shirleysburg, Pa 

Wakefield, R. M Rockhill, Pa 

Wakeman. J. W., Harrisville, Va 

Walker, Daniel H., . . Lull, Somerset, Pa 
Walker, S. A., . Bloomville, Seneca, Ohio 

Wallace, Carl, Morrill, Kans 

Wallace, Lewis, . •. . Maryland, Ogle, 111 
Wallick, A. B., . . Mammoth Spring, Ark 

Wampler, D.S Lonaconing, Md 

Wampler, Joseph W., Edom, Va 

Wampler, Amos, ... Knobnoster, Mo 
Warren, Edward, .... Sevastopol, Ind 
Warstler, J. H., . New Paris, Elkhart, Ind 
Watkins, Lafayette, . . Mont Ida, Kans 
Watkins, Thomas, .... Mt. Morris, 111 

Watts, Wm. S., Brentwood, Ark 

Wayland, J. W., Jr., . . Bridgewater, Va 

Weaver, William Buchanan, Mich 

Weaver, Joseph, . . Ligonier, Noble, Ind 

Weaver, J. A., Bowbells, N. Dak 

Weaver, D. H., . . . . North Liberty, Ind 
Weaver, Christian, . Brimfield, Noble, Ind 

Weaver, John E,, Goshen, Ind 

Weaver, A. A., Mound City, Mo 

Webb, Isaac E., Newmarket, Taylor, Iowa 
Weber, John, Dallas Center, Dallas, Iowa 
Weddle, Harvey, . . . Topeco, Floyd, Va 
Weddle, Joel, . . Burks Fork, Floyd, Va 
\Veddle, George, . . Dunlap, Lyon, Kans 
Weddle, Andrew J., . . Santos, Floyd, Va 

Weddle, R. M., Dunlap, Kans 

Wegley, J. W., Somerset, Pa 

Wehrley, J. P., . . . . Flint, Steuben, Ind 
Weidman, Silas, . Burbank, Wayne, Ohio 

Weily, Wm Franklintown, York, Pa 

Weimer, Dennis, . Bealton, Fauquier, Va 

Weimer, Samuel Wyman, Ark 

Weimer. F. B., . . Sterling, Wayne, Ohio 
Weirich, Jacob, . . Osnaburg, Stark, Ohio 
Wellington, J. R., . . T^ged, Delaware, Ind 
Weller. Jacob. MiUstone, Washington, Md 



Weller,.M. J., Markleysburg, Pa 

Weils, J. M., Kalamazoo, Barbour, W. Va 

Wenger, Levi A., Mt. Sidney, Va 

Wenger, Israel, . Lincoln, Lancaster, Pa 

Wenger, Ed., Fredericksburg, Pa 

Wertz, John, Quinter, Gove, Kans 

West, Landon, . . . Lanier, Preble, Ohio 

Westrick, O., Dubois, Nebr 

Wetzel, Paul, Los Angeles, Cal 

Weyand, Michael, . . Lull, Somerset, Pa 
Weybright, Wm., . Alfred, Douglas, Kans 
Weybright, Jno. S., Double Pipecreek, Md 

Wheeler, Elliot . Gridley, Kans 

Wheeler, Frank M., . . . Rockton, Iowa 
Whetstone, David, Minnesota City, Minn 

Whistler, Levi, Longmont, Colo 

Whisler, H. A., Unionville, Iowa 

Whisler, Samuel, . . North Liberty, Ohio 
Whitestine, Wm., . Modena, Mercer, Mo 
Whitmer, Daniel, .... South Bend, Ind 

Whitmer, B. B., McLouth, Kans 

Whitmer, Peter HamHn, Kans 

Whitmer, Merrill I., . . . South Bend, Ind 

Whitmer, David, Buckhall, Va 

Whitmer, John, .... Union Deposit, Pa 
Wickham, Samuel S. M., . Copperhill, Va 
Wickham, L. D., . Pilot, Montgomery, Va 
Widdowson, James, .... Dixonville, Pa 
Wieand. T. C, . . . Madisonburg, Ohio 
Wieand, Albert C, . . . McPherson, Kans 
Wiedman, Fred., . McCool Junction, Nebr 
Wike, Henry, . . River, Huntington, Ind 
Wike, Isaac, . . . Mooreland, Henry, Ind 
Wiley, Wm., .... Dillsburg, York, Pa 
Wilfong, Benjamin, .... Edray, W. Va 
Wilkins, C. L., . . . Harrod, Allen, Ohio 

Williams, C. A., Salem, Va 

Williams, Oliver, Hedges, Ohio 

Wilmoth, Wm., Top of Alleghany, W. Va 

Wilt, J. W., Altoona, Blair, Pa 

Wilt, Lloyd T., . Watson, Marion, W. Va 
Wilson, Josiah, Belington, Barbour, W. Va 

Wilson, James, Wilmoth, W. Va 

Winand, Geo., . York Springs, Adams, Pa 

Wine, Geo. S., Herington, Kans 

Wine, D. D., Covington, Ohio 

Wine, Geo. W., Ottobine, Va 

Wine, C, Covina, Cal 

Wine, Joseph, Blountville, Sullivan, Tenn 
Wine, Jacob, . Oakgrove, Jefferson, Tenn 

Wine, John M., Octavia, Nebr 

Wine, Jacob, . Ottobine, Rockingham, Va 

Wine, Geo. S., Bolivar, Polk, Mo 

Wine, Samuel, .... Jasper, Jasper, Mo 
Wine, Daniel D., . . Nevada, Vernon, Mo 

Wine, D. P., Moores Store, Va 

Wine, W. M,, Winchester, Va 

Wineman, D. B., . . Upper Strasburg Pa 

Winey, C. G., East Salem, Pa 

Winey, Thomas, .... Lawrence, Kans 
Wingard, Jos. D., . . Oxford, Talbot, Md 
Winger, H. H., Overland, Arapahoe, Colo 

Winger, David, Claylick, Pa 

Winger, Otho, ...... Sweetsers, Ind 

Wingert, Harry H., . . . Ida Grove, Iowa 
Winklebleck, Levi, . . Hartford City, Ind 
Wirt, John H., Lewistown, Winona, Minn 

Wirt, Jacob, Lewistown, Minn 

Wirt, James, Virden, 111 

Wise, David, . . . Watson, Seneca, Ohio 
Wise, W. M., Appanoose, Douglas, Kans 



Wise, Geo. E., . . Olathe, Johnson, Kans 

Wise, A. A., Middlebury, Ind 

Wise, John, . . . Conway Springs, Kans 
Witmer, Samuel Z., . Elizabethtown, Pa 

Witmore, Ira, Adrian, Mo 

Witmore, Jacob, .... McPherson, Kans 
Witmore, J. C, . . Longley, Wood, Ohio 

Witter, E. C Mexico, Ind 

Wolf, David Peru, Miami, Ind 

Wolf, F. B., . . . . Fredericksburg, Iowa 
Wolf, Daniel, . Fairplay, Washington, Md 
Wolf, Abraham, .... Libertyville, Iowa 
Wolf, Leonard, McCune, Crawford, Kans 

Wolf, D. S., Collington, Md 

Wolfe, Hiram J Mt. Morris. Ill 

Wolfe, E. M., Monmouth, Kans 

Wood, T. C, . . . . Whittles Station, Va 
Wood, Chas. H., . Snowden, Amherst, Va 

Wood, C. A Haynie.Pa 

Woods, Charles M., .... Spencer, Ohio 
Woodward, A. B., Gowrie, Webster, Iowa 

Woodie, John C, Scottville. N: C 

Woody, John C, . . Transom, Ashe, N. C 
Workman, Wm., . . . Loudonville, Ohio 

Workman, Lewis Pierceton, Ind 

Workman, David, . . Columbia City, Ind 

Workman, J. T., Jelloway, Ohio 

Workman, James, . . Rolla, Knox, Ohio 
Workman, Philip, . Mabel, Linn, Oregon 
Workman, C. J., • . , Buckeye City, Ohio 
Workman, S. J., . . . Ankenytown, Ohio 
Workman, A. S., . . . Loudonville, Ohio 

Worst, Geo., Ashland, Ohio 

Worst, David, . Lattasburg, Wayne, Ohio 
Wright, J. T., . . Deerfield, Augusta, Va 
Wright, A. L.. . . North Manchester, Ind 
Wright, J. H., . . North Manchester, Ind 

Wrightsman, P. R., 

. . 261 East Hunter St., Atlanta, Ga 

Wyatt, R., Santa Fe, Kans 

Wyne, Jacob, ..... Laplace, Piatt, 111 
Wysong, Daniel, Nappanee, Elkhart, Ind 
Yaney, Frank, . . New Corydon, Jay, Ind 
Yankey, F. A., Criders, Rockingham, Va 
Yearout, Chas. M 

817 Division St., Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Yoder, Samuel E Hemet, Cal 

Yoder, R. A., . . Sabetha, Nemaha, Kans 
Yoder, Stephen, Holmesville, Gage, Nebr 
Yoder, Y. D., .... Lima, Lagrange, Ind 
Yoder, J. J., . Monitor, McPherson, Kans 
Yoder, John, Jr., . Benton, Holmes, Ohio 
Younce, Samuel, . . Eaton, Delaware, Ind 
Young, David, . Mogadore, Summit, Ohio 

Young, I. R., Lanark, 111 

Young, J. E., Beatrice, Nebr 

Young, H. S., . . New Berlin, Stark, Ohio 
Young, Theodore B., . . . Wichita, Kans 
Young, E. S., . . North MancTiester, Ind 
Young, A. C, . . . Eaton, Delaware, Ind 

Yount, W. B., Bridgewater, Va 

Yourtee, Eli, Brownsville, Md 

Yundt, Simon E. Mt. Morris, 111 

Zern, Jacob, . . . Amherst, Phillips, Colo 

Ziegler, D. P., Mt. ^tna. Pa 

Ziegler, Jesse C., Royersford. Pa 

Zigler, Samuel, Mayland, Va 

Zigler, Samuel D., Mayland, Va 

Zigler, John P., Mayland, Va 

Zigler, D. C. . . . Stover, Augusta, Va 

Zigler, D. H Mayland, Va 

Zimmerman, J. S., . . . Hooversville, Pa 
Zimmerman, S., Davidsville, Somerset, Pa 

Zimmeiman, Jacob Mt. Solon, Va 

Zollers, Geo. D., 

. 545 Gushing St., South Bend, Ind 

Zook, Daniel, Birmingham, Iowa 

Zuck, D. M., Mercersburg, Pa 

Zuck, John, .... Clarence, Cedar, Iowa 

Zug, S. R., Elizabethtown, Pa 

Zug, H. S., MastersonvillCj Lancaster, Pa 
Zumbrun, C. K., . . Merriam, Noble. Ind 



4^ Brethren's Family Almanac, 



Dr. Peter's Blood 
Vital izer 

is not a so-called patent medicine — not a cure-all — but a reliable hous( 
remedy, carefully compounded from medicinal herbs, leaves, roots, barks, 
according to the prescription of a learned Swiss-German physician, whicl 
been handed down from father to son for three successive generations. 

Many a discovery in medicine has been hailed with delight, only 1 
thrown aside because it could not stand the test of time. Not so, how 
with Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer, the old blood-cleansing remedy. I 
been in constant use for over one hundred years, and thousands have ^ 
testified to its curative properties. 

Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer is an article of acknowledged merit, 
-distinctly different from all other medicines. It may have its imitations, 1: 
has no substitute. It not only expels the disease from the body, but it cr 
new, rich, red blood, and sound, solid, healthy flesh. It has won its wa} 
popular favor without gaudy newspaper advertising, solely on its own meri 

It Purifies the Blood. It Promotes Digestion. 

It Acts upon the Liver. It Regulates the Bowels. 

It Acts upon the Kidneys. It Quiets the Nervous Sysl 

It Nourishes, Strengthens and Invigorates. 

It Opens the Pores of the Skin and Induces Healthy Perspirati 

In short, it is a family medicine in every sense of the word, and ougl 
be found in every household. It is pleasant to take and absolutely harrr 
It is not sold by druggists, but only by local Vitalizer agents or the propr 
direct. 

^^^Persons living in localities where there are no agents for the Vi 
izer, and who have not previously ordered any, can obtain a trial box, con 
ing twelve 35 cent bottles, at the special price of $2.00. Address at all tin 

DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 
112-114 South Hoyne Ave. CHtCAQO, 1 




MANCHESTER COLLEGE LIBRARY